British news staff may face terrorism charges over Snowden leaks

Comments (24)
goatonastick wrote:

journalist = terrorist

Dec 03, 2013 3:24pm EST  --  Report as abuse
PhreeB4God wrote:

the Pandora Box is opened, the darkness of our secrets will devour our very culture. humanity cannot rely upon secrecy and ‘held confidence’s’ when the real game is ultimate power over others. No nation or nation ever remains a static entity, as populations mix, interact and leaders fail to realize that CHANGE must occur.

Dec 03, 2013 3:40pm EST  --  Report as abuse

That is ridiculous…

Dec 03, 2013 3:41pm EST  --  Report as abuse

Disgusting act of cowardice by the Government and Police. We know who the real criminals are and it’s not the Guardian or Edward Snowden Edward.

Dec 03, 2013 4:28pm EST  --  Report as abuse
RobertFrost wrote:

If the activities exposed by the Guardian were acceptable by the norms which the violators have been instilling in us for centuries, then the action of the British government is quite justifiable.

One recalls that these same activities were supposed to be conducted by the Soviets against their citizens, and their denunciation was supposed to make us proud of our governments, while reveling in “freedom” and “democracy.”

Now that the sinister cat is out of the bag we are threatened with exactly the same persecution and punishment which we were told the “Gulag Archipelago” practices against its native opponents.

A revision of our entire modern history, as related by our “historians” and instilled in us by the media needs to be rewritten not only in the light of the disclosures, but in view of the reaction of governments to the disclosures, which suggests that they never were that benign administrators of our lives, and the protectors of our freedom.

In truth, no one is surprised at any of that, although it appeared then anecdotal or limited, and the outcry of civil right workers were somewhat dismissed as professional zeal unrelated to our main problem of earning our living.

Not so, it seems, as one’s life appears to have been channeled and constrained by the practices of our governments, the least of which are the billions spent on the “Gulag” and the consequent trillions spent on the “defense of freedom.”

The social system the government upholds have lost much of its legitimacy in the light of the need for the government to resort to such unspeakable practices, both in spying on us and in arresting us if we exposed their crimes.

Dec 03, 2013 5:14pm EST  --  Report as abuse
matthewslyman wrote:

“Cressida Dick” — The same Cressida Dick who called time on Jean Charles de Menezes, authorizing the use of lethal force after hearing reports over the police radio?
I’m surprised she’s still in this line of business, so publicly calling the shots on cases like these.
Still, I am making NO suggestion that her views on matters she has clearly had extensive study and experience in, are in any way unworthy of serious consideration by our elected representatives, journalists, political scientists and security services. There has to be responsibility and accountability on all sides.

Dec 03, 2013 5:22pm EST  --  Report as abuse
matthewslyman wrote:

@RobertFrost: Thought-provoking. There are so many threats to our freedom, which battles should we prioritize?

Dec 03, 2013 5:26pm EST  --  Report as abuse
ochoa wrote:

george smiley would be appalled at the sorry state of british intelligence, or lack of it. and, horace rumpole would have had the fair cressida for lunch, or perhaps dessert. farce as comedy.

Dec 03, 2013 5:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
dd606 wrote:

matthewslyman wrote:@RobertFrost: Thought-provoking. There are so many threats to our freedom, which battles should we prioritize?”

———–

I would think it would be the battles involving the nuts who are hell bent on blowing up as many of us as possible. But apparently, a big chunk of the public seems to think the priority should be stopping horrific acts of destroying privacy… like storing your phone bill information inside some server farm somewhere, that no human being will probably ever see. The same phone bill info that about a million telecom workers could look at, at their leisure. Oh my god! The horror! The world will never be the same again!

I hope they do get them with jail time. They’re a bunch of self-centered, anarchist, leeches… who are willing to risk the safety of their countrymen, for the sake of selling ad space.

Dec 03, 2013 5:57pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crusoe wrote:

It’s a sad day for the free world. The British news staff are not the ones who should be facing legal action here. The world owes the Guardian a debt of gratitude for having the guts to do what is right.

Dec 03, 2013 5:58pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Bob9999 wrote:

I disagree that collection of data by these national security agencies is a threat to our freedom. I think the collection of data by Google and others is more nefarious. After all, your individual identity is known to Google when you use its products, and those products include various cookie-based tracking services provided to non-Google web sites under brand names other than Google.

The business model of Google, Facebook, and other Internet communications companies is based on collecting information about the Internet use of non-paying “users” and selling that information to paying “customers”. By contrast, national security agencies prize the fact that they collect data secretly — which means it isn’t available to the highest bidder.

If you want to worry about being spied on, worry about ubiquitous companies like Google and Facebook, which are in the business of collecting and selling information identifiable to individual users. I like Google’s products and use them, but I have more concerns about my privacy vis-a-vis Google than I do vis-a-vis any national security agencies that may have records of my emails.

Dec 03, 2013 6:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
ChrisHerz wrote:

What a fine coincidence: Soviet dissenters in Stalin’s times were sent to the Gulag for violations of Article 58 of the Soviet code.

Dec 03, 2013 6:27pm EST  --  Report as abuse
UrDrighten wrote:

If the English people don’t like the way their government’s behavior, they should take to the streets and bring them…….

Oh, wait! I forgot. The English no longer own any guns. I guess they’ll just have to keep that stiff upper lip while their government maintains a stiff lower appendage.

Dec 03, 2013 6:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse
m_thomas wrote:

Presumably, Reuters, Inc., participated in signing-on in defense of press freedom in the Letter (posted at the Guardian) sent in the names of established news publishers and editorial organizations in US and UK. Presumably, NSA and GCHQ have no intention of reducing blanket surveillance and will (do) circumvent all laws and regulations that will be (is) put forth by public officials and legislators. In short, intel will act above the law no matter what “democratic oversight” is established. Also, the role played by the private sector (telcos, ISPs, social-network sites, etc.) has not been properly exposed due, no doubt, to commercial pressures. But these twin oligarchies act together; acting together they form a prodigious power structure that threatens to become impenetrable.

The matter of “press freedom” reaches a critical mass when reporters, editors and publishers are threatened with criminal prosecution. In the Watergate period, as Carl Bernstein well knows, it was called a “chilling effect”. Up until the press-at-large seized the banner and joined the Washington Post in its revelations regarding the Nixon administration, reporters and editors practiced “self-censorship”.

Mr Rusbridger complimented the US system for forthrightness several times in his testimony. However generous this appears, the fact remains that the US intel establishment has a White House and Congress in its employ and needs the adamancy of Mr Cameron’s shock troops now to set an example for Mr Obama to follow.

In short, we are living through a period where democracy itself is threatened by the very forces entrusted to protect it. To impose regulations upon NSA is a half-measure. American multinationals (our techno-”Stasi”) needs these as well.

Dec 03, 2013 6:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
m_thomas wrote:

Presumably, Reuters, Inc., participated in signing-on in defense of press freedom in the Letter (posted at the Guardian) sent in the names of established news publishers and editorial organizations in US and UK. Presumably, NSA and GCHQ have no intention of reducing blanket surveillance and will (do) circumvent all laws and regulations that will be (is) put forth by public officials and legislators. In short, intel will act above the law no matter what “democratic oversight” is established. Also, the role played by the private sector (telcos, ISPs, social-network sites, etc.) has not been properly exposed due, no doubt, to commercial pressures. But these twin oligarchies act together; acting together they form a prodigious power structure that threatens to become impenetrable.

The matter of “press freedom” reaches a critical mass when reporters, editors and publishers are threatened with criminal prosecution. In the Watergate period, as Carl Bernstein well knows, it was called a “chilling effect”. Up until the press-at-large seized the banner and joined the Washington Post in its revelations regarding the Nixon administration, reporters and editors practiced “self-censorship”.

Mr Rusbridger complimented the US system for forthrightness several times in his testimony. However generous this appears, the fact remains that the US intel establishment has a White House and Congress in its employ and needs the adamancy of Mr Cameron’s shock troops now to set an example for Mr Obama to follow.

In short, we are living through a period where democracy itself is threatened by the very forces entrusted to protect it. To impose regulations upon NSA is a half-measure. American multinationals (our techno-”Stasi”) needs these as well.

Dec 03, 2013 6:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Lovetwo wrote:

Truth is justice.

Journalistic Truth is not terrorism. Journalistic Truth is a pivotal principal of democracy as it pertains to freedom of speech.

However wide spread government spying, threatening and intimidation of innocent and well intended civilians is a form of terrorism and a vile threat to OUR democratic principals.
Government and industrial espionage is illegal.

Eye, and many, many well intended civilians world wide, including journalist, scientists…, are being black listed for speaking the truth and for seeking justice.

If the governments, who are breaking the laws, insist on black listing people who seek justice by way of the Truth; then Universal Law will ensue.

Be advised that the largest world wide uprising of individuals against the current criminal activities of their respective governments will be enacted.

People world wide will stand, united; Governments will fall.

The Truth is rising, Glory be to God.

Omega

Dec 03, 2013 6:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
torchwood wrote:

Dissent is terrorism.

Dec 03, 2013 7:03pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Lovetwo wrote:

@torchwood

Terrorism: Is the systematic use of violence (terror) as a means of coercion for political purposes.

Peaceful protests, amass, is not terrorism.

Unless you are getting your definition from the revised “Cameron dictator-ary”.

Dec 03, 2013 7:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
WJL wrote:

Intimidation!. You can have press freedom as long as you toe the line.

Dec 03, 2013 9:41pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Caardvaark wrote:

You say you’ll change the constitution
Well you know
We all want to change your head
You tell me it’s the institution
Well you know
You better free your mind instead

Dec 03, 2013 10:13pm EST  --  Report as abuse
xyz2055 wrote:

Why isn’t publishing classified government documents that these journalists clearly know was obtained illegally a criminal offense? This is akin to driving the get away car at a robbery. They are in fact an accomplice to the illegals actions of Edward Snowden.

Dec 04, 2013 1:58am EST  --  Report as abuse
BestGuess1 wrote:

With President Obama the USA has two years before intelligence arrives. The games are so quick that this will be old hat soon. Let us assume, communication is good with good people and not good with bad people. Its a bakers dozen at the moment. The sins of the father are not the son so turn up the role to the wisdom and let life live. We all know the dead cost no more. I have applied for a brain in Washington but reciprocity in license is slow and action threw inaction. Motion applied Y/N 1/1 1/0 0/1 We love Cressida.

Dec 04, 2013 3:23am EST  --  Report as abuse
Lovetwo wrote:

These surveillance programs steal information from innocent people, Eye for one.

This is news worthy, the fact that governments are stealing information from private citizens for their own profit.

The real crime against humanity here is the government(s) interference of information related to saving the planet from rapid accelerated climate change. Hence “controlled” capitalism and stagnation of the global economy to suit their oil, arms sales, illegal drug… interests.

They, al lied governments, should be tried for attempted murder of 7 billion people.

Truth be known.

Omega

Dec 04, 2013 8:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
Lovetwo wrote:

Correction: They, al lied governments, “WILL” be tried for attempted murder of 7 billion people.

Dec 04, 2013 9:43am EST  --  Report as abuse
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