EU suspends trade talks with Ukraine, crowds rally against government

Comments (17)
Wiggymaster wrote:

It’s obvious to all but the most brainwashed and the most ignorant that Yanukovich and his cronies are nothing more than puppets of Putin and the Russian Lubyanka. The Soviets – and the Cold War – are back, baby. We hardly had time to miss them.

Dec 15, 2013 6:43am EST  --  Report as abuse
FRPSR wrote:

It is an ill wind that blows no good .

Dec 15, 2013 7:11am EST  --  Report as abuse
Ataner wrote:

Russia supported North Korea’s attack on the South in 1950 with tanks, mobile armor and encouragement and we see today a sickly state. Ukraine will become the same embarrassment if it continues to suck the Russian tit.

Dec 15, 2013 8:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
RonHG wrote:

Well Reuters? How about a less dismissive approach towards the people protesting in support of the govt; or a fair perspective on blatant EU/UN/USA interference within a sovereign state?

How would the UK or the US respond to mass, impromptu rallies at home with foreign, prominent politicos coming in to stir the pot?

How are Spain and Italy dealing with mass protests at the moment? No tear gas or batons there eh? Any threats of sanctions? Hypocrisy springs to mind.

This is more about hegemony than the best interests of all the Ukrainian people.

It is nothing short of a Western encouraged attempt to incite a coup of the democratically elected government, for wanting a fairly reciprocal deal to offset the demanded changes; all from an institution which, even now is being re-evaluated by some of its own member states.

I’m no great lover of government, but once it is democratically elected, it should serve its term, otherwise we would end up with a change of government every five minutes, and stability becoming a thing of the past.

Perhaps we should sit this one out.

Dec 15, 2013 11:16am EST  --  Report as abuse
RonHG wrote:

Well Reuters? How about a less dismissive approach towards the people protesting in support of the govt; or a fair perspective on blatant EU/UN/USA interference within a sovereign state?

How would the UK or the US respond to mass, impromptu rallies at home with foreign, prominent politicos coming in to stir the pot?

How are Spain and Italy dealing with mass protests at the moment? No tear gas or batons there eh? Any threats of sanctions? Hypocrisy springs to mind.

This is more about hegemony than the best interests of all the Ukrainian people.

It is nothing short of a Western encouraged attempt to incite a coup of the democratically elected government, for wanting a fairly reciprocal deal to offset the demanded changes; all from an institution which, even now is being re-evaluated by some of its own member states.

I’m no great lover of government, but once it is democratically elected, it should serve its term, otherwise we would end up with a change of government every five minutes, and stability becoming a thing of the past.

Perhaps we should sit this one out.

Dec 15, 2013 11:16am EST  --  Report as abuse
Arnleif wrote:

Fuele’s words suggested the European Union has lost patience with Kiev’s demands for financial aid and was irritated at the way the bloc was being forced to take part in a ‘bidding war’ with Russia over Ukraine.

Well, there should be no surprise that the free market ideology only applies to “others”. Western nations are by unspoken law exempt from the vile and barbarian thing called competition, Russia should acknowledge that.

Dec 15, 2013 12:37pm EST  --  Report as abuse
TonyBlue wrote:

In the old days you had to take possession of the country’s resources and people in order to conquer it. Now all the country’s resources and manpower is distilled into Money. So all you have to do is take over their banking system to conquer a nation. Germany has re-conquered Europe via the European Union – in which Germany dominates the banking system. Now Russia is trying to get themselves in the mix by creating their own economic “union” – where the lesser members are exploited for resources and manpower then left with all the debt.

This is the new way to subjugate entire nations without firing a single bullet. The reason you conquer a nation is to take its labor and raw resources. That’s all this is. Whoever they decide to go with will rape them, pile them up with debt and then force them to “internationalize” their infrastructure by selling it to the master nation’s commercial interest. It’s a shame.

Dec 15, 2013 12:39pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Danram wrote:

So if the west is guilty of “crude meddling” in Ukraine, I wonder what Dimitry Medvedev would call the arm-twisting that Russia has been doing?

Dec 15, 2013 6:11pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Danram wrote:

So if the west is guilty of “crude meddling” in Ukraine, I wonder what Dimitry Medvedev would call the arm-twisting that Russia has been doing?

Dec 15, 2013 6:11pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Petter wrote:

EU with Füle being one of them is the part that has pressed Ukraine and made it clear, and left no room for Ukraine to collaborate closer with Russia as the DCFTA is far beyond a association agreement. Ukraine has more trade with the customs union countries and that forces Russia to deal with EU to trade with it’s closest neighbors and to remove obstacles to trade it has to have an agreement that the whole of EU signs of to. That is essentially stalling Russia-EU integration and trade relations, not helping it as Russia is purposefully left out.

It’s not only meddling in internal affairs, sponsoring, paying and training opposition figures – most of which really aren’t pro-western – it is also trying to divide Ukraine ones again in the regional and political divide that the Orange Revolution caused, that didn’t work then and excluded large parts of the country from participating in political work. Essentially Yanukovich getting elected and the changing majority of the parliament was a normalization. So that things could start to work again, and uniting the country while they said no the the chaos caused by the Tymoshenko supporters. EU countries should have learned from Georgia as well as the Orange revolution not to buy into this, and not to stand by autocrats but because of their political leanings or ignorance they haven’t.

Putin isn’t the one coming to the Ukrainian parliament telling them they can’t have closer ties to the European Union, but Füle was when it came to their ties to Russia. It’s the DCFTA that makes it impossible to have trade barriers removed on both sides. They didn’t do this to advance integration but rather as a political action against Russia. That EU put forwards deals to Georgia and Moldova but not more stable neighbors is also ludicrous as Georgia and Moldova doesn’t even control all their territory and has conflicts or unresolved disputes with other countries. They don’t only exclude some of their neighboring countries which are far more stable and reasonable actors while promoting agreements with instable countries it also excludes Russia from having close ties.

Klitschko should have known better than aligning himself with far-right fascists and his potential democratic credentials is all gone.

What’s next will McCain align himself with Hungary’s Jobbik, France’s Front National and other anti democratic movements? In practice the parties and leaders EU and US tries to align them selves with here will not implement EU regulations and will not share the same basic values when it comes to freedoms and democracy.

Dec 15, 2013 6:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Dron wrote:

What did Russia exactly do you call arms-twisting?

Dec 15, 2013 6:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
f00 wrote:

Far-right “fascists” who support EU integration are fools, dupes, or paid off.

Nationalist movements aren’t “anti-democratic,” they represent the will of a majority of the population. Open support is kept down by anti-”hate” laws and legal/illegal harassment by jew-whipped traitorous regimes.

Observe Greece. Once Golden Dawn showed they would not cower, no matter what abuse the regime dealt them, including assassination, their support rose. Even the establishment and its leftist tools have admitted this.

Dec 15, 2013 7:19pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Bcilley wrote:

John McCain is playing a dangerous game with the lives of the protesters. Just what does he plan on doing when Putin starts playing hard ball(which he has been known to do)? Just what does “unacceptable to the US” mean? The protesters will expect
US support if Russia cuts off gas deliveries or pursue other economic sactions

Dec 15, 2013 9:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
UauS wrote:

Just look at the faces of people in Pro-European camp and their Pro-Yanukovich opponents… these faces will tell you all… if you REALLY want to know.

Dec 15, 2013 9:39pm EST  --  Report as abuse
BraveNewWrld wrote:

McCain:
“We are here to support your just cause, the sovereign right of Ukraine to determine its own destiny freely and independently. And the destiny you seek lies in Europe,”

This is hilarious! Sounds like a quote from the Simpsons episode. Here is your choice: sign the agreement with EU. You can make it freely and independently. And if you don’t – then sanctions!

Dec 15, 2013 9:48pm EST  --  Report as abuse
BraveNewWrld wrote:

UauS wrote:
Just look at the faces of people in Pro-European camp and their Pro-Yanukovich opponents… these faces will tell you all… if you REALLY want to know.

Reuters does not seem to treat us with reporting on alternative to EU rallies – so looking at the faces of pro-Yanukovich crowd as you suggest is more or less practical impossibility for us. Long live glorious “democratic media”.

Dec 15, 2013 10:01pm EST  --  Report as abuse
umkomazi wrote:

To those in Ukraine who are desperate to join the EUSSR – you’re just swapping one dictatorship for another!

We peasants in the British province of the EUSSR or 4th Reich (makes little odds which label you use) will be FORCED to pay for Romanian and Bulgarian scroungers from next year….. yes, I will go to work knowing that some of the money taken in taxes is being handed to lazy scroungers from the eastern provinces of the Reich…..I was under the impression that the Nazis were defeated in ’45 – but perhaps I was mistaken.

Dec 16, 2013 12:59am EST  --  Report as abuse
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