Man arrested with $153,000 at Nashville airport

Comments (37)
ivanw2 wrote:

What is his crime? Since when is it illegal to carry a large sum of money?

Jan 14, 2014 5:38pm EST  --  Report as abuse

All our money has drug residue on it. Just don’t carry a bunch of it or it will go back to the Feds.

Jan 14, 2014 5:40pm EST  --  Report as abuse

All our money has drug residue on it. Just don’t carry a bunch of it or it will go back to the Feds.

Jan 14, 2014 5:40pm EST  --  Report as abuse
5150B wrote:

go to your local bank with draw a large sum of money so you have a few hundred bills with you. have a drug dog smell the money and see if you get a hit. 90% of money circulating will have drug trace on it.

Jan 14, 2014 5:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Dantes wrote:

This is bad. I bet every dog would hit on currency for drugs. This is legalized extortion, because the money will be forfeit and the guy will have to prove the money is not guilty of a crime. Of course, the police dept gets to keep it.

Jan 14, 2014 6:08pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Chris525 wrote:

It was probably over $200,000 and the officers just took there bonus.

Jan 14, 2014 6:42pm EST  --  Report as abuse
skullsmashr wrote:

legal theft. cops are crooks now.

Jan 14, 2014 6:42pm EST  --  Report as abuse
djohnc wrote:

>”The manner in which the U.S. currency was wrapped is consistent with that of drug proceeds,” the affidavit says.

Yeah, right. No one else bundles money in a way that is inconsistent with druggies.

Jan 14, 2014 6:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse

Drug dogs are taught to hit on currency traffickers are either carrying large quantities of drugs or cash.

Jan 14, 2014 6:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Harry079 wrote:

I read one time that about 80% of $100 paper money has coke traces on it.

Maybe they should run those drug dogs through the vaults of JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo.

Jan 14, 2014 7:04pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Poalima wrote:

Travel with lots of cash – you’ll be robbed by someone.

Jan 14, 2014 9:29pm EST  --  Report as abuse
drauckerr wrote:

His mistake was failing to launder the money before trying to launder the money.

Jan 14, 2014 9:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
apacect wrote:

What an idiot. Could have bought a pc motherboard & wrapped up $30k-$50k in aluminum foil at a time & fed ex’d the board & cash overnight, insure it for $700 of course so they don’t lose it. Then he could have flown 1st class for $700 vs. $20k.

Jan 14, 2014 11:28pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Snowmonkey wrote:

He will never see that money again. It will buy junkets for pretend training, lunches, military type equipment and supplies and Fido the sniffer, a big drug coated bone. There are cops whose only job is to search for such piles of money and other goods that can be confiscated. Drug and the confiscation of related wealth has created and supports a new luxury class. I bet they dust that money with cocaine when they print it, just to attract Fido.

Jan 14, 2014 11:54pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AndrewRegan wrote:

Only $10,000 for bail, if he can get the money, he is gone

Jan 15, 2014 12:27am EST  --  Report as abuse
RealityChecks wrote:

Lol. Good one, drauckerr.

Gotta say I have a problem with this treatment.

Of course, he did kinda confess after the fact.

Jan 15, 2014 1:09am EST  --  Report as abuse
hw5050 wrote:

I’ve never understood why/how something like this can happen. If you checked the cash in pockets of any law enforcement officer about 50%(a low estimate) would probably test positive for cocaine. And under the current federal law, even if this man is cleared of any charges, the govt does NOT have to return the assets seized… Why is it illegal to carry cash? The govt can talk and say all they want (they do make the laws) but its absurd for something that has “This is legal tender” printed on it, BY THE US GOVT, to be illegal to carry, in any sum you want…

Jan 15, 2014 1:59am EST  --  Report as abuse
dmc091 wrote:

I’m surprised they didn’t throw in a courtesy anal probe, like they do in New Mexico, after making off with his money.

It worries me that this individuals crime could simply have been carrying cash at the airport and everything else speculation / character assassination.

I once knew an incredibly friendly retired fireman who lived on a small plot of land and raised livestock because he enjoyed it. When I met him he had brought a baby goat with him to the local bank branch, thing was adorable. This guy had a long career and made more than he ever spent. He also had stacks and stacks of gold bars and god knows how much actual cash sitting around his home. For some reason over the years he had invested in physical gold and didn’t trust the banks to hold it.

What would have happened if he moved and tried to fly with a bag full of his wealth? The thought that some security office could potentially queue their dog to signal, pull up something from his background to justify it, and make off with the money scares me. Such a friendly old guy, wouldn’t deserve it.

If there is no direct evidence that this is involved an active drug-deal there should be no grounds to hold this guy up. Hell, popular news reports 90% of U.S. bills contain traces of cocaine.

Jan 15, 2014 4:01am EST  --  Report as abuse
808 wrote:

This is called policing for profit – “search policing for profit – Tennessee” on google or youtube police in Tennessee do this all the time and claim it is drug money when it is not. More police abuse, we should i be tired of it!

Jan 15, 2014 4:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
worldhipster wrote:

It is a well known fact that all US currency has trace amounts of cocaine on it. So if brought before a judge unless you caught him with the drugs on his oerson the money should be returned to him unless you can prove it comes from sales of drugs.

Jan 15, 2014 5:00am EST  --  Report as abuse
worldhipster wrote:

It’s not illegale to carry large amounts of money in country but if travelling outside country you must declare amounts exceeding 10,000.00 USD.

Jan 15, 2014 5:05am EST  --  Report as abuse
worldhipster wrote:

next time drive

Jan 15, 2014 5:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
YKLWEF wrote:

He consented to a search. NEVER consent to a search, people! These criminal thugs in government will screw you every time.

Jan 15, 2014 7:58am EST  --  Report as abuse
carlo151 wrote:

Better call Saul!

Jan 15, 2014 8:14am EST  --  Report as abuse
presti8 wrote:

arrested for drugs or having too much cash on him? kind of makes you wonder

Jan 15, 2014 8:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

So what is his crime? It is not illegal to carry large sums of cash on you in this country. And any large collection of cash WILL have traces of drugs on it. It is also AFIK not illegal to give a confusing explanation on why you are carrying the cash – or even to refuse to explain why you are carrying said cash a perfectly legal if abnormal activity. If it was a women with a $200K diamond necklace, would she have been charged with “money laundering”? Why not? They BOTH would have been carrying equivalent financial assets on their persons.

Jan 15, 2014 1:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse
jdblackwater wrote:

So… It’s suspicious to have money? It’s suspicious to have money well organized in bundles with rubber bands around them? It’s suspicious if money, bills, LOTS of bills, bills handled by thousands of people -hundreds of whom have traces of drugs on their fingers- has some traces of drugs? Does that mean they are traces of YOUR drugs?
-
I think a lawyer is about to make an easy hundred grand getting this guy off the hook.

Jan 15, 2014 7:49pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Ancalimon wrote:

What is this? ALL U.S. paper money has traces of drug molecules on them. He was not leaving the U.S. so he had no legal reason to declare the cash. In short it is none of the business of the cops to even ask him about the cash or for that matter to have a dog sniff for drugs on the bills. He may or may not be laundering money but if they did not find drugs then they need to return the money and if they have reason to believe that he is in the illegal drug business then start an investigation for that. Until then, he is innocent until proven guilty and they should return the cash and issue an appology.

Jan 15, 2014 8:01pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Ancalimon wrote:

What is this? ALL U.S. paper money has traces of drug molecules on them. He was not leaving the U.S. so he had no legal reason to declare the cash. In short it is none of the business of the cops to even ask him about the cash or for that matter to have a dog sniff for drugs on the bills. He may or may not be laundering money but if they did not find drugs then they need to return the money and if they have reason to believe that he is in the illegal drug business then start an investigation for that. Until then, he is innocent until proven guilty and they should return the cash and issue an appology.

Jan 15, 2014 8:01pm EST  --  Report as abuse
kommy wrote:

The banks are not safe, electronic fraud allover the place, but one cannot carry his own cash?

Jan 15, 2014 9:33pm EST  --  Report as abuse
DbPolk wrote:

Woo-hoo!! Big time at hooter’s tonight.

Jan 15, 2014 11:55pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Johnnykinpin wrote:

That’s what they say, They will all split the money between them selfs!

Jan 16, 2014 8:14am EST  --  Report as abuse
L.E.F.T. wrote:

The violation was “structuring” . He structured the proceeds into the financial system with the intent to circumvent the currency reporting requirement, (CTR). This is a violation under federal law. So a federal agency must be involved. This more than likely will be an Administrative Civil forfeiture. If convicted this man face a penally of 5 years in federal prison. Law Enforcement Financial Training.

Jan 16, 2014 2:25pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AlsoConcerned wrote:

You have the right to remain silent. Use it while you avail yourself of the right to an attorney.

Jan 16, 2014 4:08pm EST  --  Report as abuse
ToshiroMifune wrote:

Everything is illegal in the U.S.S.A.

Jan 16, 2014 9:52pm EST  --  Report as abuse
SKYDRIFTER wrote:

If he keeps his mouth shut, what charges are possible – pursuant to “normal” prosecution standards?

In the meantime, any (assumed) criminal associates just got put on notice to go on the defensive.

The bad guys also learned another example in not paying in cash – anywhere. (He would have been “reported” if he’d attempted to buy a car with the same amount of cash.)

Oh, yes, the other lesson being that PHYSICALLY laundering cash might add 20% to its value, in the form of cocaine contamination. (Calling “Mythbusters!”)

So, does this guy demand a refund for his attempted charter flight, pay taxes on the money & walk free?

Imagine the associated legal issues:

1. “… legal tender”
2. Presumption of innocence
3. Probable cause
4. Slander, libel & defamation of character
5. Unlawful restraint
Etc.

Jan 20, 2014 7:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
BlkHrt13 wrote:

“The manner in which the U.S. currency was wrapped is consistent with that of drug proceeds,” the affidavit says.
I did not realize drug dealers wrap their money in a special way that no one else does.. Is it like a secret handshake sort of thing? To join a cartel, you have to pass a currency wrapping test? Do they give out merit badges for it too?

Jan 21, 2014 9:40am EST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.