U.S. frees tech companies to give more spying data

Comments (12)
herbxerx wrote:

Sounds like a bunch of bullsh*t

Jan 27, 2014 5:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
RyeSkeptic wrote:

The idea that knowing the number of requests is somehow more enriching / telling than details about the nature of the requests and the source is questionable. One should probably just start with the assumption that data from all services is being requested by the US government. Each Tech company at risk of receiving these requests could make things a good deal less “easy” for the US government if they included a very visible disclaimer at the start of each use of their services / software making this kind of assertion. Of course, the downside to that is foreign firms might not face similar requests, creating a competitive disadvantage for US Tech firms – quite consistent with what the Obama and Bush administrations seem to want to do.

Jan 27, 2014 5:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
pickettjm wrote:

Governments collect user info, businesses collect user info. The future will be built using analyses of such data. I am more concerned about private info and not about whom I contact. Many seem to want to hide what they are doing. Why? Guilt?

Jan 27, 2014 6:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
seafloor wrote:

@ p-i-c-k-e-t-t-j-m
That’s because I like to share my secrets with whom I want.
Btw. Sorry for covering your nick, but maybe you’re a friend or a friend of a friend of a terrorist and I don’t want to be revealed too closed to your network.

Jan 27, 2014 8:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
FTCAIN wrote:

Barack Big Brother Obama is obsessed with spying on American citizens

Jan 27, 2014 8:07pm EST  --  Report as abuse
4sight2020 wrote:

here’s more of that tranparency that obama promised.

Jan 27, 2014 9:42pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Val.K wrote:

Are we supposed to be impressed by them imitating transparency?
Isn’t the data that they get without any court order, or any legal basis to begin with, our real concern? I do not live in the US, but policies prevalent there will eventually creep their way through the rest of the world and that doesn’t seem all that great to me.

Jan 28, 2014 2:24am EST  --  Report as abuse
leonew wrote:

“President Barack Obama’s administration, however, was wary of disclosing data it believed might help suspected militants in other countries avoid surveillance.”

barack obama’s administration DIDN’T get caught spying on “suspected militants” they got caught spying on american citizens… and allied leaders… SPIN, SPIN, SPIN.

Jan 28, 2014 11:28am EST  --  Report as abuse
leonew wrote:

“President Barack Obama’s administration, however, was wary of disclosing data it believed might help suspected militants in other countries avoid surveillance.”

barack obama’s administration DIDN’T get caught spying on “suspected militants” they got caught spying on american citizens… and allied leaders… SPIN, SPIN, SPIN.

Jan 28, 2014 11:28am EST  --  Report as abuse
leonew wrote:

why is reuters censoring posts???

Jan 28, 2014 11:31am EST  --  Report as abuse
Slrman wrote:

It isn’t as if any rational person still believes the USA is a free country. Think about it. No-warrant wire taps, indefinite detention of citizens without charges, approval of rendition of prisoners and torture, stop and frisk without probable cause, search and seizure without a warrant, no-knock entry, confiscation and destruction of cameras that might have been used to film police acting illegally, police brutality, police shootings that go without investigation, managed news, and the civil-rights destroying “Patriot” Act.

Acts of police behaving illegally, with shootings, Tasers, and unwarranted violence now appear almost daily. Rarely are these offenses punished. Most often “an investigation” is claimed, but soon forgotten.



In addition, the USA, with perhaps 5% of the world population, has 25% of all of the prisoners in the world. That means the USA has the most people in prison of any nation in history. Even by percentage of residents incarcerated, not just sheer numbers. USA is # 1



Does any of that sound like a free country?

As Dwight D. Eisenhower said about communism, “It’s like slicing sausage. First they out off a small slice. That isn’t worth fighting over. Then they take another small slice that isn’t worth fighting over. Then another and another. Finally, all you have left is the string and that isn’t worth fighting over, either.

Jan 28, 2014 12:25pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Slrman wrote:

It isn’t as if any rational person still believes the USA is a free country. Think about it. No-warrant wire taps, indefinite detention of citizens without charges, approval of rendition of prisoners and torture, stop and frisk without probable cause, search and seizure without a warrant, no-knock entry, confiscation and destruction of cameras that might have been used to film police acting illegally, police brutality, police shootings that go without investigation, managed news, and the civil-rights destroying “Patriot” Act.

Acts of police behaving illegally, with shootings, Tasers, and unwarranted violence now appear almost daily. Rarely are these offenses punished. Most often “an investigation” is claimed, but soon forgotten.



In addition, the USA, with perhaps 5% of the world population, has 25% of all of the prisoners in the world. That means the USA has the most people in prison of any nation in history. Even by percentage of residents incarcerated, not just sheer numbers. USA is # 1



Does any of that sound like a free country?

As Dwight D. Eisenhower said about communism, “It’s like slicing sausage. First they out off a small slice. That isn’t worth fighting over. Then they take another small slice that isn’t worth fighting over. Then another and another. Finally, all you have left is the string and that isn’t worth fighting over, either.

Jan 28, 2014 12:25pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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