CVS becomes first big U.S. drugstore chain to drop tobacco

Comments (60)
kafantaris wrote:

It’s about time retailers took the initiative.
Lung cancer is real. Anybody who works with Hospice or is in the undertaking business would tell you that.
Sad to see so many good people meet an early death. And their loss impacts their loved ones for years. People don’t come back from the grave.
We should make it our business then to help smokers quit — despite their own abandon.
Maybe they can’t help themselves.

Feb 05, 2014 9:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
MJK1 wrote:

Most of the people I see in line at our local CVS are buying, cigarettes. I guess CVS doesn’t mind loosing their business. I wonder how accurate their research was on this?

Feb 05, 2014 9:35am EST  --  Report as abuse
MJK1 wrote:

Most of the people I see in line at our local CVS are buying, cigarettes. I guess CVS doesn’t mind loosing their business. I wonder how accurate their research was on this?

Feb 05, 2014 9:35am EST  --  Report as abuse
MSparkles wrote:

Don’t be fooled, CVS will never have your best interest at heart. All they care about is making money, and they do this by improving the public’s perception of them while they’re secretly selling your medical history to third parties after you electronically sign their HIPAA waiver. Do you want your prescriptions filled at a medicine churning factory like CVS, or do you actually want the pharmacists to spend time verifying your meds? It makes much more sense to go to a grocery store pharmacy or Costco/Walmart. People think that a nationwide drugstore chain like CVS means better quality, when in fact the exact opposite is true.

Feb 05, 2014 9:40am EST  --  Report as abuse
odonnks wrote:

I’m not a smoker and never was. Pulling tobacco on one hand then legalizing marijuana in WA and CO is in conflict.

I don’t agree we who don’t should force those that do to stop smoking, drinking, eating sugar, of high fat diets.

440,000 smoking related deaths yearly in the US.
1,200,000 abortions performed each year.

The drive in this action is to reduce health care costs, not save lives. If saving lives were the true goal stoping abortions would offset lives lost to smoking 3 to 1.

You see, a smoker has a high risk of becoming a burden to the insurance industry whereas abortions do not.
What a mixed up world we live in ….

Feb 05, 2014 10:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
actnow wrote:

Hope others will follow.

Feb 05, 2014 10:08am EST  --  Report as abuse
mikevan9 wrote:

This is an honorable thing to do, and dead on the money (no pun intended) for a pharmacy chain. But it really comes down to dollars. http://tinyurl.com/nwh8jho

Feb 05, 2014 10:22am EST  --  Report as abuse
PrevMed1971 wrote:

Many people and organizations have worked hard to pressure CVS Pharmacy, a licensed health care provider, to stop selling cigarettes, a product that when used as intended causes sickness and death to the user. There’s been an ongoing grass root effort for the past four years specifically aimed at CVS called “CVS Sells Poison”, as well as efforts by many organizations nationwide to get all pharmacies to stop selling tobacco products. It is heartening to see CVS make the decision to do the right thing and stop selling a product that is the root cause of a staggering amount of illness and death nationwide. Bravo.

Feb 05, 2014 10:22am EST  --  Report as abuse
explorer08 wrote:

A brilliant decision both for business model reasons and for moral reasons. You can’t say you are retailer of health-related products and sell death at the same time.

Feb 05, 2014 10:30am EST  --  Report as abuse
z0rr0 wrote:

Dunno..
Why would a company that makes its money from sicknesses and from exorbitant prices for medicines get so righteous?
If it were to stop selling every product with a negative side effect the shelves would be empty.

Feb 05, 2014 10:54am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
geewizz wrote:

What about the health issues associated with smoking pot?

Feb 05, 2014 11:29am EST  --  Report as abuse
Bondoboy wrote:

This move by CVS is not as noble as you might think and I question their loss estimate. On the Central Coast in CA, they started keeping them in the stockroom under lock & key (after a snatch & run theft in King City, CA). The wait for a carton of cigarettes was longer than the wait for a prescription to be filled. You had to wait your turn in line, order the cigarettes, then wait for the line to clear while the cashier sauntered to the rear of the store and returned. This could not have been cost effective from a man hour standpoint. I stopped buying there when they handed me a 3 year old carton. Apparently many had stopped purchasing CVS cigarettes long before I had.

When you factor in the labor and insurance savings I’m betting that the loss by CVS will be much lower. This move is dictated from the bottom line, not the bottom of their hearts.

Feb 05, 2014 11:46am EST  --  Report as abuse
Bondoboy wrote:

This move by CVS is not as noble as you might think and I question their loss estimate. On the Central Coast in CA, they started keeping them in the stockroom under lock & key (after a snatch & run theft in King City, CA). The wait for a carton of cigarettes was longer than the wait for a prescription to be filled. You had to wait your turn in line, order the cigarettes, then wait for the line to clear while the cashier sauntered to the rear of the store and returned. This could not have been cost effective from a man hour standpoint. I stopped buying there when they handed me a 3 year old carton. Apparently many had stopped purchasing CVS cigarettes long before I had.

When you factor in the labor and insurance savings I’m betting that the loss by CVS will be much lower. This move is dictated from the bottom line, not the bottom of their hearts.

Feb 05, 2014 11:46am EST  --  Report as abuse
aidtopia wrote:

They should also stop selling the homeopathic “remedies”. Stocking those next to science-based, clinically tested medicines sends as bad a message as selling cigarettes.

Feb 05, 2014 11:49am EST  --  Report as abuse
strathmore wrote:

Thank you CVS- I watched people I love live a horrid last few years due to smoking.

Feb 05, 2014 11:49am EST  --  Report as abuse

Dualcitizen you sure are one sick puppy.

@odonks, referring to your statement of ‘Pulling tobacco on one hand then legalizing marijuana in WA and CO is in conflict.’ you have a point, but the problem is we have no real idea if smoking pot causes the same things as tobacco. Because this research has not been allowed. Now that steps are being taken to legalize it, maybe some real studies can be done to see if marijuana smoke is as carcinogenic as tobacco smoke.

I kind of doubt it, because a lot of the carcinogens in cigarettes come from how they process it. Also there are compounds in Marijuana that help the lungs, like bronchial dilators. Personally I converted to vaporizer a few years ago.

Feb 05, 2014 11:56am EST  --  Report as abuse

More than 2/3rds of the price of cigarettes is TAX! Is this why they are trying to push POT on the American people???

Feb 05, 2014 1:00pm EST  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

“The drive in this action is to reduce health care costs, not save lives. If saving lives were the true goal stoping abortions would offset lives lost to smoking 3 to 1.”
========
From Wolfram Alpha – total worldwide annual deaths from smoking: 57.8M, total worldwide annual abortions: 4.8M. Seems pretty clear the greater evil is tobacco, AND that’s before recognizing that comparing deaths of sentient beings to collections of growing cells with the *potential* to become a sentient being is comparing apples to oranges in the first place.

Feb 05, 2014 1:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
herman54 wrote:

I commend CVS for there responsible act , I will shop there every time I can , Thank You CVS , GOD Bless the C.E.O.’s of CVS to put costumers ahead of profits and lead the way to a Cancer free society.

Feb 05, 2014 1:50pm EST  --  Report as abuse
willich6 wrote:

CVS, as a private corporation, has the right to sell what it wants.. This gives them a ‘positive spin’ and a lot of free media coverage.. but please understand, no matter how you view this, CVS is acting in their own best interests – not smokers.. They are looking at the ‘bottom line’…

Feb 05, 2014 2:15pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Steele66 wrote:

“I think CVS recognized that it was just paradoxical to be both a seller of deadly products and a healthcare provider,” U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Thomas Frieden told Reuters.”

So I guess they are going to stop selling beer and potato chips as well…

Feb 05, 2014 2:33pm EST  --  Report as abuse
dawgster wrote:

terrific, now lets get rid of the sugary drinks and fat loaded snacks.

Feb 05, 2014 2:40pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Overcast451 wrote:

*I kind of doubt it, because a lot of the carcinogens in cigarettes come from how they process it. Also there are compounds in Marijuana that help the lungs, like bronchial dilators. Personally I converted to vaporizer a few years ago.*

Naaa, not so much. I’m not debating the specifics of what you say – but both are harmful – to a degree. It’s the heat that does most of the damage, sure the vaporizer helps – but it doesn’t eliminate that totally.

I smoke… well not cigarettes now – and cigaretts are *most certainly* worse than pot. HOWEVER; they BOTH are harmful to a degree and they both can cause more need for healthcare. The both would annoy a non-smoker, just by virtue of smoke in the air.

It’s funny how people ‘spin’ Tobacco one way and pot another. They always justify their own bad habits; and then further try to lessen the concept of their own bad habits by demonizing others. This has been the problem with pot legalization for YEARS – the ‘pro-booze’ crowd have always been the biggest zealots with demonizing pot use; now the tables are just turning a bit. The pro-pot crowd over demonizes cigarette smokers, lol.

Look; no matter how you spin it – they are both harmful to a degree.

That being said – since I quit smoking cigarettes; I rarely ‘hack and cough’ now. I can exercise exponentially more without cigarettes; it’s been one of the best choices for me to quit them. However; I was a moderate heavy smoker – not all people are.

Feb 05, 2014 2:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
bloozguy wrote:

Here in Ontario, Canada if you sell drugs you can’t sell tobacco.

Feb 05, 2014 3:00pm EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

Oddly enough there are plenty of medications and other chemicals CVS will sell to you with a prescription that will kill you much quicker than cigarette smoke. Alchohol adversely affects every organ in your body, but they will still sell that.

Feb 05, 2014 3:07pm EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@Overcast451

Carcinogens are released when you combust just about anything. Vaporizing is not burning. So those carcinogens are not released. That is why smokeless tobacco and e-cigs are much less harmful to you than smoking. Sit in a closed garage with your combustion engine car running long enough and you will sucumb to the chemicals released by your combustion engine. You can use tobacco and marijuana in much safer ways than just smoking it.

Feb 05, 2014 3:11pm EST  --  Report as abuse
digitalfear wrote:

What about beer, junk food, RedBull, and candy? What’s next?

Feb 05, 2014 3:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
pajamaman wrote:

This is the first step in CVS going our of business. As a non-smoker, I believe that smoking tobacco (or anything else) is a choice not to be legislated or discriminated against, IMHO

Feb 05, 2014 3:29pm EST  --  Report as abuse

@Overcast and TheNewWorld, I agree with both of you. FYI, I was never trying to say that smoking pot is ‘healthy’ (like a lot of idiots I know that do, the same type that will not call it pot or weed, only ‘Cannabis’, annoys me so much), I was just trying to say that from my own experience it does not seem to be as bad, but I admit never smoked tobacco.

the way I see it, you should have a right to smoke either, just not in public as you are then affecting others. It is then the government’s responsibility to study the bad effects (and good) and present those in a thoughtful manner. So then people can make their own decisions about what to do. Just like CVS is doing here, although a corporation not a person.

Feb 05, 2014 3:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
FC_sonic wrote:

I avoid shopping at CVS, but they made a great positioning move against Walgreens, RiteAid and the other drug chains. It doesn’t matter if they did it for the bottom line, it’s big PR and is getting them in the headlines.

Walgreen’s slogan “At the Corner of Happy & Health” runs counter to them selling cigarettes. With the way RiteAid has been headed the last decade, they should have pulled off this move first.

Feb 05, 2014 4:10pm EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@USAPragmatist2

I think the benefits of marijuana far outweigh any benefits that tobacco provides. As far as the negative side effects, I am not sure there has ever been a side by side study where one group smoked a pack of marijauna vs a group smoking a pack of cigarettes. Obviously most people would never smoke that volume of marijuana on a daily basis, although I am sure there are some out there who do. I don’t have a problem with CVS doing this. They want to present an image of being a healthcare provider.

If I was Walgreens I would do the opposite and add in a tobacco super store to draw the smokers from CVS.

Feb 05, 2014 4:17pm EST  --  Report as abuse
LaurelCollins wrote:

@aidtopia..

aidtopia wrote:

They should also stop selling the homeopathic “remedies”. Stocking those next to science-based, clinically tested medicines sends as bad a message as selling cigarettes.

=========

aidtopia, perhaps people like you should stop posting since your statement is grotesquely lacking in the facts or any kind of research into the science behind homeopathyl.

Did you ever do a bit of research on it.. and I don’t mean looking it up on Wikipedia either. But of course, starting out with such a biased opinion such as yours would likely reap a biased result.

Here is my 5 minutes of a simple google search.. Let’s see.. explain to me why 9 MDs are on the board of American Institute Of Homeopathy.

http://homeopathyusa.org/about-aih-2/board-of-directors.html

Did you know..

“There are more than 150 placebo controlled clinical studies, most of which have shown positive results, either compared with a placebo or compared with a conventional drug”

“The fact that homeopathy became extremely popular during the 19th century primarily because of its impressive successes in treating the infectious disease epidemics that raged during that time is a fact that is totally ignored by skeptics.(3)(4)(5) It is highly unlikely that a placebo response is the explanation for homeopathy`s notable successes in treating epidemics of cholera, yellow fever, scarlet fever, typhoid, pneumonia, or influenza.”

http://www.naturalnews.com/029419_homeopathic_medicine_evidence.html#ixzz2sUHUgi49

“To adequately and accurately evaluate homeopathy, one has to evaluate the whole body of evidence that has enabled homeopathy to persist for 200+ years. While evaluating double-blind clinical trials is important, so is evaluating the wide body of basic sciences, as well as the clinical outcome trials, the epidemiological studies, the cost-effectiveness literature, and the serial case review trials.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dana-ullman/the-case-for-homeopathic_b_451187.html

============

I am interested in the TRUTH, aidtopia. What exactly is your interest?

Feb 05, 2014 5:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Brokenferrule wrote:

I visited CVS Pharmacy in Northern Kentucky. Interesting they want to be more health-conscious, yet they are selling cheap sugary snacks, beer, wine and distilled spirits. You can pick up a bottle of Jack Daniels not 20 feet from the pharmacy counter. What is the REAL reason for shutting out tobacco?

Feb 05, 2014 5:18pm EST  --  Report as abuse
DLRay wrote:

Great 1st step, I’m impressed, even if there’s probably money in it a year from now. Just switched to CVS.

Feb 05, 2014 5:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
SuzieQie wrote:

CVS is a hero in quality and leading the way to health. WE will support CVS with our business !

Feb 05, 2014 6:31pm EST  --  Report as abuse
SuzieQie wrote:

Homeopathy is a proven way to achieve good health.

Feb 05, 2014 6:33pm EST  --  Report as abuse
cheeze wrote:

Congratulations, doing the right thing over profits. Let’s hope this catches on.

Feb 05, 2014 7:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
thistle163 wrote:

Tobacco addicts are public nuisances and walking health hazards all. They are self-made slaves to a burning vegetable; after all those people in human history fought and died for their freedom, and accounting for all the people who lived and died and were never free.

But I don’t care what they do with their lives. I care about what they do to others. I care about all the five year old children who hit the deck with Status Asthmaticus, near-death and sometimes dying, because twenty minutes earlier they had the misfortune of walking past a tobacco addict – who remained oblivious.

I care about newborn infants whose lungs are the size of Ping-Pong balls and whose respiratory systems are about as robust against tobacco fumes and particulates as wet tissue paper. It takes a true drug addict to smoke around a newborn infant. For a parent to smoke around their children IS child abuse; the only question is to what extent they ruin the health of their offspring. How red & irritated will the addicts’ childrens’ eyes be, chronically, compared to healthy children, and how much study time will it cost them each night? How many A+ students become B or C students because, sitting at their desks each night, their eyes grow sandy twenty minutes faster than their peers whose parents are not addicts?

How many otherwise A+ high school students didn’t even go to junior college because they were forced to grow up breathing the vandalized air from their tobacco addicted parents and they contracted their own individualized set of respiratory symptoms which they experienced on a daily, or even hourly, basis, year-round?

How many ENT surgeries will the tobacco addicts’ offspring need? I’ve had three and counting under general. How many allergy shots will the offspring need because their tobacco-addicted parents assaulted them every single day with the products of their addiction, kicking their immune system into overdrive and eventually making them allergic to everything in the air that one could conceivably call an allergen? I’ve had a couple hundred intermittently already, and I’ve just settled in to what I hope to be my first full and un-interrupted course of shots, (My full-course of shots should be over after five to six years.)

Tobacco addicts stink! I mean, they don’t know it because of what they’ve done to their capacity to smell, but some of them actually smell poisonous, (like what you would think cyanide probably smells like)!

Their houses and cars, which all eventually get sold to unsuspecting buyers, are filled with the 3rd-hand smoke, (def: 2nd-hand smoke after it lands), from a thousand cigarettes. The carpets, sofa cushions and bed mattresses in tobacco addicts’ homes are completely spiked with ash; and we all know that infants and toddlers tend to breath more carpet and sofa cushions than they do free-air in the course of their days.

Thank You CVS, for what you have just decided to do; and no-thanks for having been a pusher and an enabler for all those years.

Feb 05, 2014 8:58pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Maruzik wrote:

“I think CVS recognized that it was just paradoxical to be both a seller of deadly products and a healthcare provider,” U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Thomas Frieden told Reuters.

Following th same line of paradoxical principles, they should stop selling alcoholic beverages…

Feb 05, 2014 9:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
RobertFrost wrote:

I find the decision of CVS, which hopefully to be followed by other retailers, most welcome.

What is difficult to understand is the position of the US administrations over tobacco. It is known that it causes many diseases but the pressure of the tobacco companies who own most members of Congress is such that death is distributed with the sanctions of the FDA, the federal agency which regulates food and drug products.

But then, the same applies to so many other ingested products, which are actually banned in Europe because of either certain hazard to the health of the citizens, potentially hazardous or its danger is considered worth evaluation before unleashing it on the unsuspecting citizens.

Not so in the US. The corporations decide all that. All what it costs is additional pennies dropped in the so-called “Re-election Funds” of the Congressman or Congresswoman who seems to be a problem!

Then we turn to export our democracy!

Feb 05, 2014 9:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
8701d8701 wrote:

But CVS will go on selling alcohol, won’t it? What is that about? Alcohol is addicting and causes lethal disease.

Feb 06, 2014 12:00am EST  --  Report as abuse
Extraomnes wrote:

As an older smoker, I commend the decision by CVS, & almost any & all anti-smoking moves. I believe that the biggest corporate scam of the 20th century was tobacco. It is to be hoped that someday in the future, smoking will be referred to as “something people used to do.”
That being said, I suspect that CVS had plenty of economic advice regarding future profit margins from tobacco sales shrinking consistently enough to make the move worthwhile. And, it is superb PR.
I do not mean to denigrate any part of this decision, but the truth is: it is 2014 CE, & ‘we’ have been aware of the risks/dangers/ of tobacco for many decades

Feb 06, 2014 1:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
IfYouSeeK wrote:

I have had enough of the attacks on smokers. CVS can suck me. It will be a cold in Hades when I shop there.

Feb 06, 2014 2:58am EST  --  Report as abuse
wildman80 wrote:

Its funny how CVS will stop selling tobacco because it is not healthy for you, and because they want to be a better health care partner. Well why are they going to continue the sale of alcohol? Alcohol is in the same boat as tobacco! They are both not healthy for you. Sounds like a hot steaming pile to me!!!!

Feb 06, 2014 7:58am EST  --  Report as abuse
wildman80 wrote:

America you need to wake up!!! All of our so called rights are being taken away one at a time. Everyone needs to stop buying everything smokes gas alcohol, milk everything. Make the farmers and big corporate monster feel the same sting all of us consumers feel every time you are forced to pay $4.50 for a gallon of gas or 12.00 for a pack of smokes or 6.00 dollars for a pound of ground beef!!!! Wake up! We need to make a stand and not fall prey to corporate jerk offs!!!

Feb 06, 2014 8:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
Carol2000 wrote:

There’s no inherent contradiction between selling cigarettes and selling pharmaceuticals. So, reading their actions, the anti-smokers are up to their usual trick of buying companies in order to force them to engage in acts that are contrary to their own financial interests, for the sake of promoting social engineering goals. (Which they have been doing ever since the days of the American Tobacco Trust a hundred years ago. In a flagrant example, the stepson of the head of the American Cancer Society, who declared war on smoking, was a director of Philip Morris for nearly 20 years.) Tellingly, William C. Weldon, former Chairman and CEO of Johnson & Johnson, is a director of CVS. The fast food industry is also full of their ilk, as well as other sectors which are under attack by the activist oligarchy. And although their activities are supposed to be forbidden by SEC regulations, they are of course never called out for them.

Feb 06, 2014 9:36am EST  --  Report as abuse
Carol2000 wrote:

The anti-smokers deliberately commit scientific fraud to falsely blame smoking for diseases that are really caused by infection. Every Surgeon General report is proof.

http://www.smokershistory.com/SGlies.html
http://www.smokershistory.com/SGHDlies.html

Feb 06, 2014 9:46am EST  --  Report as abuse
newbieturtle wrote:

Now if we could just get them to stop selling hard liquor . . .

Feb 06, 2014 11:07am EST  --  Report as abuse
Ms.Tamez wrote:

what about the alcohol?

Feb 06, 2014 12:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
GregoryOlson wrote:

I like that CVS is designing the future they want in part by dropping tobacco products. Punching customers in the face and then offering to dress their wounds isn’t consistent thinking and it isn’t good business. This change actually frees up CVS from conflicting and confusing messages as they begin to offer smoking cessation therapy and engage on a national smoking cessation program.

In my book, The Experience Design BLUEPRINT: Recipes for Creating Happier Customers and Healthier Organizations, one of the recipes I share is especially relevant to this story. It is Recipe #3: Write the Future You Want. You simply create the stories that you wish for customers to tell. As CVS continues to forge ahead on their mission I imagine countless stories told by millions of customers (patients) that are helped by the 26,000 pharmacists and nurse practitioners serving across 7,600 CVS stores. Of course fully embracing Recipe #3 will have CVS moving toward a future where other products are scrutinized and similarly dropped, while yet other products and services will be introduced. Read my expanded comments at http://bit.ly/1g6W4nE

Feb 06, 2014 3:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
z0rr0 wrote:

Costco’s generic version of Allegra, the allergy medication, retails for $30 for 120 tablets, while the CVS brand is $12 for only 15 tablets. A month’s supply of the generic version of anti-anxiety drug Lexapro costs $7 at Costco but $126 at CVS.

As most merchants know, it is all about traffic. If smokers stop stopping by stores, CVS will lose the Allegra and Lexpro sales too. Wait a few quarters, when the bottom line looks bleaker?

Feb 06, 2014 4:47pm EST  --  Report as abuse
GregoryOlson wrote:

I like that CVS is designing the future they want in part by dropping tobacco products. Punching customers in the face and then offering to dress their wounds isn’t consistent thinking and it isn’t good business. This change actually frees up CVS from conflicting and confusing messages as they begin to offer smoking cessation therapy and engage on a national smoking cessation program.

In my book, The Experience Design BLUEPRINT: Recipes for Creating Happier Customers and Healthier Organizations, one of the recipes I share is especially relevant to this story. It is Recipe #3: Write the Future You Want. You simply create the stories that you wish for customers to tell. As CVS continues to forge ahead on their mission I imagine countless stories told by millions of customers (patients) that are helped by the 26,000 pharmacists and nurse practitioners serving across 7,600 CVS stores. Of course fully embracing Recipe #3 will have CVS moving toward a future where other products are scrutinized and similarly dropped, while yet other products and services will be introduced.

Feb 06, 2014 8:57pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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