As losses mount, Sony's Hirai seeks cure for TV business in spinoff

Comments (18)
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:36am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:36am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
JWhatshisface wrote:

It saddens me to see this happening. Sony has always been an innovative creator in electronics, usually with superb quality. What they fail to realize, however, is that their electronics are subject to the same problems as any of the other “smaller” manufacturers in the world, making the cheaper products more appealing to consumers. If there is a red bouncy ball branded with LG, and one with Sony, what’s going to make the difference in choosing one? Generally, the price. Sure, the Sony ball may bounce a little better due to the higher quality rubber used, but does anyone really care about an inch or two more of height? Nobody is going to slam it down at its maximum potential.

Their TV’s are incredible, without a doubt. But a quick glance at the price tag could make anyones eyes stray towards cheaper brands such as LG and Samsung. When I’m watching a movie, I really don’t care whether or not I can see individual drips of sweat seeping through the actors pores. And the colors… Sony’s TV’s tend to be a little more realistic with the color aspect, where Samsung uses many deep and very rich blacks creating almost a fake look. Wake up call: The vast majority of the world prefers fake. Reality is so last year. Look at all the women with fake nails, fake lips, fake breasts and fake bottoms. Sometimes, being too real can hurt you. The turd needs to be polished a bit.

Sony’s phones – I don’t quite know where to go with this one. Up until recently, I was completely unaware of the fact that they even made a phone. A majority of American cell phone providers don’t even offer Sony’s phones. I see them all over in Europe, but prior to my excursion outside the blinding bubble of the United States? I had never even seen a Sony phone. But let’s look at some of the things they may be hurting them… The cost is substantially higher than that of Motorola and Samsung. And while Motorola’s focus in the mobile phone industry is higher and more concentrated than Sony’s, I still see no reason Sony couldn’t drop the prices down to be a little more competitive and appealing to the market. Another small tactic they could use on their Android devices: Put something Sony proprietary in it! For instance, Android is plagued with “problems” for the novice user. Being an open source linux based OS, developers can freely write applications for the devices, not subject to scrutiny of their code. Often, apps are plagued and riddled with memory leaks from failure to properly clean up after themselves. And then to add on top of that, users generally open stacks of apps on their phones and don’t realize that hitting the home button simply puts them in the background without freeing the memory up that the apps are consuming. Sony – try putting an automatic task killer in your phones, and polish the turd marketing wise with some garbage jargon – S.M.A.R.T. – Sony Memory and Resource Tools, for instance. It’s all about turd polishing, folks. Especially when targeting American market. You can convince an American to eat a dog turd and absolutely love it if it’s polished up the right way.

PlayStation Network – that’s going to take a hit. People loved Sony on the fact that there were no monthly fees associated with playing video games online. Truth be told, I was always a PlayStation fanatic prior to getting my first Xbox 360. However, during the course of my time with Xbox, I had made a decision to migrate back to PlayStation. That is, up until they started charging for access to the PlayStation Network. If I’m going to pay, I might as well go ahead and stick with the Xbox for that matter.While I understand that something had to be done to address the rising cost of maintaining the infrastructure and loss of income in sales, not to mention the loss on the cost of producing the gaming console, I don’t think taking the follow the leader approach is going to go in Sony’s favor. America is getting cheap and stingy, more so than we’ve ever been. They probably expected to pick up that loss of price difference on the manufacturing of the device by charging the monthly cost, predicting that they would make more off of that recurring cost in the long run, anyway. Personally, I’m not much of a gamer, so I can’t comment too much here. PC’s, on the other hand…

Sony has always had very intriguing computers. They’ve been unique, stylish and oh, let’s not forget proprietary as hell. My statement earlier remains true about their prices being way higher than the competitors, with no advantage over it. It’s almost like going to Starbucks to buy regular coffee. Sure, their signature drinks are rather tastier than others, but for those of us who part with $5 for a urine sized sample cup of coffee? The vast majority of us feel stupid because of the fact that we could have gotten a “tall” cup of coffee for fifty cents, or even free, at the grocery store. But notice the change from “small” to “tall” – allow me to once again reference my phrase: the polish the turd. My last experience with VAIO was not pleasant. I paid over $1,000.00 for the laptop, and within 3 years, the DVD-RW went out on it. This was at a time that a vast majority of software was still coming on disc’s and even required the disc to be in the drive to run. I *HAD* to get the drive replaced. Sony wanted ~$950 for the drive. I brought the laptop outside and put it right where it belonged in my mind at the time: the garbage can. If they’re going to claim the drive cost that much to manufacture, then they failed somewhere in their business model. Collectively, the cost of manufacturing a device includes each component being put in to the device, and even final assembly. A failure to properly manage the production or obtainment of individual parts sourced for the build would be the only reason that price would be that high, other than them gouging to make a profit. Considering this is the tech industry, I’m leaning more towards greed as the reasoning behind it. I’ve worked for every type of technology business you can imagine, from ISP’s to hardware developers. The mentality is consistent across the board: we make something you need, and it’s a commodity. You’re going to pay the price we set. A majority of people are catching on to this mentality and realizing it makes no real difference to go with the cheaper brands, because the same problems exist no matter the name embossed on the device. At this point, the only reason to buy a VAIO is to carry it around much like a Starbucks cup, touting it proudly as some form of status symbol. Most people don’t care of their laptop is branded Sony or if it’s branded Gateway, Dell, or anything else for that matter. When dealing with the PC market, especially when running any Microsoft OS, your problems will be no different between any other piece of hardware. The name brand can’t fix “stupid,” and that’s something I see many manufacturers incapable of understanding.

It’s truly sad to see so much change inside of an organization who’s name has stamped an image of the future in to my head since my childhood days. I remember the days of the Sony Walkman and Discman like they were yesterday. Sony has helped me through a majority of my misguided youth. My adolescent anger was often cooled by the blissful serenity bestowed upon me via a walkman and/or disc man delivering my sanctity in music. In a sense, they were my salvation for everything from anger to boredom, and it’s a name that I grew up recognizing. But cutting 5,000 jobs is a heart breaking event, especially for those falling victim to the cuts. How much do you want to bet the heads at the top of the food chain still enjoy their expensive lifestyles, from fast cars to extravagant yachts? Meanwhile, a bigger portion of their employee base struggles just to survive. Is this cut really necessary, or is it necessary to maintain the luxurious lifestyle being lived by those at the top? What Sony doesn’t seem to realize is that this move embeds an image in to the customers heads of not only greed and scrutiny, but instability. I can assure you that with a 5,000 employee cut, you can bet your arse that a big chunk of them have been with Sony for quite some length of time. So, in my eyes, they’re firing the people that made Sony, well… Sony. The people behind the company make the company, so why would I buy a product from a company that isn’t the company I thought it to be, or once was?

Feb 06, 2014 6:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
tmc wrote:

PCs are going to be left to Dell and Lenovo. Businesses of all sizes will need PCs for quite some time. But without retail, only two will survive. Perhaps only one?

Feb 06, 2014 6:42am EST  --  Report as abuse
tbro wrote:

Really too bad they are selling their PC business. I bought a vaio laptop in 2009 and it’s still running flawlessly today-best computer I’ve ever owned.

Feb 06, 2014 6:59am EST  --  Report as abuse
Eggysan wrote:

My concern is their camera future. I went from Minolta in 1988 to Konica-Minolta in 2004 to Sony 2012.

Feb 06, 2014 7:17am EST  --  Report as abuse
tatman wrote:

sony electronics will not be missed, imho. could it be that losses are mounting in this area because their products are sheer crap? the last sony tv i bought years ago (very high end and expensive at the time) didn’t even last 4 years before it blew out. i bought a top of the line sony 3d blu ray player for a xmas gift a year back, and it couldn’t play 3d blu rays, leaving us frustrated (after 5 epic failed movie nights with friends – quite embarrassing….) and spending 5 hours over the phone with horrible tech support to try to solve the problem to no avail. that player cost me over $350. we gave it away and bought a $99 lg 3d blu ray player which works flawlessly. i’ll never purchase another sony product as long as i live. so long, sony!

Feb 06, 2014 7:33am EST  --  Report as abuse
Rich_F wrote:

tmc you’re wrong on the PC front i believe HP will remain as well but agreed you are looking at major consolidation in that space to only a few players.

Feb 06, 2014 9:32am EST  --  Report as abuse
Rich_F wrote:

tatman, agree with you on quality especially the bravia tv’s. a little over 2 years into my almost $2000 purchase of an HDTV one of the LCD bulbs burned out and no way to fix the unit. i’ll never buy sony again.

Feb 06, 2014 9:33am EST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.