Malaysia military source says missing jet veered to west

Comments (119)
chudds007 wrote:

probably sitting on some remote airfield in Iran .

Mar 10, 2014 10:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
RickyBobbyII wrote:

An Iranian named Mr. Ali booked two one way tickets on stolen passports. No evidence of a terror attack, Malaysian officals say. Nope, doesn’t sound fishy to me. What’s the main religion of Malaysia? Oh gee, it’s 61% Islam, go figure they’d say that.

Mar 10, 2014 10:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Lumberjet wrote:

There s the possibility that China or N Korea was trying some missile that went wrong way. And everybody will keep silent about it to avoid military conflict. Pity for the passengers; they re victims of dirty politics..No way 4 days and no trace of such a big plane unless some dirty facts is being covered..

Mar 11, 2014 3:39am EDT  --  Report as abuse
BanglaFirst wrote:

It is wonderful that humanity comes together following such tragedy that we forget differences in religions,cultures and politics. We pray for the victims families that their pain is lessened and we pray for the search & rescue teams from many brotherly Nations who are scouring the sea, mountains and forests are always safe.

Mar 11, 2014 3:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
DavidinWY wrote:

How easy is hiding a jumbo jet from radar, radio and satellite coverage? You’ll have to forget all that TV show CSI crap, James Bond guys would fail, there’s no giant subs, no runways leading into volcanos and a jumbo landing on a freeway would draw somebodies suspittion. Once you know how much fuel the plane has, eventually the plane will be found inside that circle. Planes with this much tech, and all those GPS cellphones leave traces, the radar does see an image even without transponders. If it didn’t blow up or crash, it landed, if it did crash or blow up, pieces will float and be found.

Mar 11, 2014 4:04am EDT  --  Report as abuse
kjhseoul wrote:

Perhaps. that can be find traces of its
from photos by spaceships,
if there were in there some space astronauts
about the time of accidents,
they might have some kind of photos to accident airplan.

Mar 11, 2014 5:58am EDT  --  Report as abuse
seymourfrogs wrote:

I hope now that the Lockerbie stitch up has finally been unraveled, the originator, former captain of USS Vincennes, living comfortably somewhere will finally be held to account for his contribution.

Mar 11, 2014 6:31am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Tandaemonium wrote:

Maybe I’m missing something. If this strait is one of the biggest shipping routes in the world, wouldn’t someone on one of these busy ships noticed a crapload of debris randomly in their way in the last 4 days?

Mar 11, 2014 7:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
naj999 wrote:

My money is on falling man made Space Debris…there is plenty of it about.

Mar 11, 2014 7:43am EDT  --  Report as abuse
zebra100 wrote:

The police are right. If it is mechanic blow up or bomb, it should have been at the signal lost site and debris all over, nothing found: if it is hijack, the purpose was a political statement, the y would have tried as loud and flashing as possible, couldn’t have gone unnoticed without request and must caused turmoil on the craft, also the automatic signal system should have gone through; only some one really known the plane can turn off all the communications and flew below the radar to doom the plane in an unknown and deliberately no one could found place—purpose? to destroy all the evidence— major purpose? to avoid criminal charges and got him family large sum of insurance— when most of these kind insurance has suicide restriction and murder void terms. And this guy himself might be emotionally or otherwise suicidal, since to bring such large plane quietly without anyone’s notice was almost impossible, the only ones were the pilots, either of them only need to disable other and locked the cockpit, then without notice he could literally do anything without even alarm anyone else on the plane until doom.

Mar 11, 2014 8:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bakhtin wrote:

DavidWY

It wasn’t a jumbo. It was a 777. Not a 747. Not a 787. A 777. This is not rocket science…

Mar 11, 2014 8:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
db51 wrote:

If that plane had crashed on land or in the jungle, there would have been a huge plume of smoke at some point in time that easily could have been detected by satellite imagery I think. I don’t know how you would hide a jumbo jet, but I can tell you from watching Airplane Repo on television that sometimes they can’t locate jumbo jets that have been hidden by dead beat owners hiding them from a bank or financial institution. Maybe the thing is sitting in a hanger somewhere. With the incompetence of many airports, maybe they changed the planes identity and set it down somewhere under some phony call letters. If they can read your license plate from a Google Satellite, then they probably already know where this thing is.

Mar 11, 2014 8:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
najathmanzil wrote:

The report is heard with a sigh of relief as we can at least get the corpses if not alive

Mar 11, 2014 8:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
User2 wrote:

Question for the Malaysian government: Why is the radar detection on the west of Malaysia only announced three days after dozens of aircrafts and ships from so many nations have searched the east of Malaysia for thee days? Does this explain why the Malaysian authorities could so quickly dismiss those debris found by Vietnamese rescuers in the South China Sea?

Mar 11, 2014 9:18am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Walt_P wrote:

The location of Pulau Perak makes me wonder if the plane was heading to a secret location in Sumatra.

Mar 11, 2014 9:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
splinky wrote:

Isn’t it kind of weird that you can put a small device on a car and track where it goes to within 15 meters and yet they don’t seem to know within 200 miles where a freaking plane went? Wth?

Mar 11, 2014 9:46am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Sewcrates wrote:

If this plane was tracked over the Straits of Malacca, would it not mean that someone deliberately turned of the transponder, and whatever other monitoring systems (gps) are on the Boeing 777. I am assuming that all the onboard monitoring systems do not get their power from the same source. Aren’t all cockpit doors fortified and supposedly locked during flight. So the radio was out also and the captain could not communicate with the ground. This story is frustrating , suspicious, and tragic.

Mar 11, 2014 9:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RicardoQueso wrote:

Has there been any report of a signal from the plane’s flight data recorder – the “black box” we’re always hearing about whenever there is a plane crash?

Mar 11, 2014 9:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RicardoQueso wrote:

Has there been any report of a signal from the plane’s flight data recorder – the “black box” we’re always hearing about whenever there is a plane crash?

Mar 11, 2014 9:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RicardoQueso wrote:

Has there been any report of a signal from the plane’s flight data recorder – the “black box” we’re always hearing about whenever there is a plane crash?

Mar 11, 2014 9:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RicardoQueso wrote:

Has there been any report of a signal from the plane’s flight data recorder – the “black box” we’re always hearing about whenever there is a plane crash?

Mar 11, 2014 9:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JJ72 wrote:

Seems likely that if at least one of the individuals on a false ID was seeking asylum and felt the need to use a false ID to get there that someone was interested in stopping him. My immediate suspicion is that it is too coincidental to be unrelated. Maybe these guys weren’t terrorists but could they have been targets?

Mar 11, 2014 10:11am EDT  --  Report as abuse
mark_kaskin wrote:

Back in 1972-73, I flew over Vietnam in RF-4Cs out of Korat RTAB, Thailand and flying over Vietnam is dangerous as hell. During Linebacker II in ’72, we’d lose 3-4 jets a week, just out of Korat. The AAA and SAMs in Vietnam are thick as a London fog, and if you manage to get through that you can get jumped by MiGs out of Ph(u)c Yen airbase. If you manage to get past that, youstll gotta fly back over the heavily defended Red River valley packed witheven more AAA and SAMs. It’s like a thousand flaming golf balls and exploding orange softballs whizzing up past your canopy. Scary as hell place to fly. Why they planned the fight path over Vietnam is just inexplicable. The Vietnamese hate the Chinese. They fought a border war in 1979 and CHina just seized Vietnam’s Spratley Islands last year by force.

Mar 11, 2014 10:18am EDT  --  Report as abuse

WHY is this information coming to light .. THREE DAYS LATER?

Mar 11, 2014 10:35am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Avada wrote:

I am now suspecting Malaysia government is hiding something, as Malaysia’s air force says the Military radar suggests the missing Malaysia Airlines plane turned west away from its planned route, before vanishing. So why they delay releasing such important infomation and let multinational rescue forces wasting their time near thailand bay. what if the malaysian navy is on the “correct” spot and trying to get what they want while misdirecting other countries?

This makes me associate this incident with Korean Air Lines Flight 007, while the USSR air force shot it down and misleading international rescure, while the flight recorder was secretly found and kept.

It is probable that there’s somthing seriously wrong according to the infomation given now.

Mar 11, 2014 10:41am EDT  --  Report as abuse
dahak wrote:

@ gcf1965, you are mistaken sir. Not all wide bodies are Jumbo’s, only the largest wide bodies are considered Jumbo’s, such as the B747, the A380, and the new B777-9. This aircraft was not a dash 9.

Mar 11, 2014 10:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Like Payne Stewart’s plane. Sudden and complete loss of cabin pressure. Everyone dies of asphyxiation on the plane. Then it flies, at low altitude to avoid radar, in a straight line until it runs out of gas and crashes into a field in the Dakotas, er, South China Sea.

Mar 11, 2014 11:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
davistoni975 wrote:

This is such a sad story. My heart goes out to the families of such a tragedy. I would give everything I had to find those victims. May they rest in peace.

Mar 11, 2014 11:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
adamrussell wrote:

Thats quite a big deviation from course. How could they have gotten that far with transponder turned off and no one one noticed? Flight control doesnt keep track?

Mar 11, 2014 11:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

So all this phone spying, computer spying, and no-fly list nonsense from American intel agencies and….

two dudes flying with stolen American passports does not raise any red flags? Either the CIA is as incompetent as they appear, or there’s a lot more to this story.

Mar 11, 2014 11:17am EDT  --  Report as abuse
dcayman wrote:

A map might be nice instead….

Mar 11, 2014 11:17am EDT  --  Report as abuse
scomata wrote:

Not to extend a fact check but the 747 is really the only plane called a Jumbo, the A380 is called a Super Jumbo. While technically you will find definitions saying any two isle plane is a jumbo that is not really true, a 767 and 787 (or A300 and A330) are significantly smaller planes compared to a 777 (or A350), and a 777 is not a s big as a 747 and it almost always referred to as a wide body. In fact, a 767 uses two 747 engines (a 747 has 4 engines), so that tells you how much smaller it really is. The only way you could call the 777 or A350 a Jumbo is if you called it a Mini Jumbo.

The real test for a jumbo is TWO decks for passengers, over 400 passengers, or 4 engines (for now), and only the 747 and 380 fit that definition.

A 767 has two isles but is half as wide as a 747 and carries as few as 181 passengers, not much more than an average single isle. Not “Jumbo” by any means.

Mar 11, 2014 11:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
scomata wrote:

Not to extend a fact check but the 747 is really the only plane called a Jumbo, the A380 is called a Super Jumbo. While technically you will find definitions saying any two isle plane is a jumbo that is not really true, a 767 and 787 (or A300 and A330) are significantly smaller planes compared to a 777 (or A350), and a 777 is not a s big as a 747 and it almost always referred to as a wide body. In fact, a 767 uses two 747 engines (a 747 has 4 engines), so that tells you how much smaller it really is. The only way you could call the 777 or A350 a Jumbo is if you called it a Mini Jumbo.

The real test for a jumbo is TWO decks for passengers, over 400 passengers, or 4 engines (for now), and only the 747 and 380 fit that definition.

A 767 has two isles but is half as wide as a 747 and carries as few as 181 passengers, not much more than an average single isle. Not “Jumbo” by any means.

Mar 11, 2014 11:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Herb999 wrote:

Seems to me that we may have over securified ourselves here. If the cockpit crew becomes incapacitated, there’s no way for anyone to get to the flight deck with the door locked. The plane will stay on autopilot until fuel runs out. I think current security precautions are such that in flight, the cockpit door must be opened from the inside.

Mar 11, 2014 11:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse

In WWII we used camouflage nets to hide 34 air bases along with other factories and plants. Rubber automobiles and rural neighborhood scenes painted on canvas with hundreds of fake trees and shrubs gave very large areas a three dimensional appearance. To show signs of life, workers occasionally emerged to relocate automobiles, and through hidden trap doors in the canopy, appeared to take walks on hidden catwalks and pretended to do maintenance work.

Really quite amazing. . . . google “world war 2 camouflage cities” to see how realistic they were. . . and this was 75 years ago.

Mar 11, 2014 11:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
cactus02 wrote:

Check North Korean airports, their bizarre behavior may have something to do with the missing flight.

Mar 11, 2014 11:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
biskit wrote:

It is incredulous that cooperating governments have no clue where this massive jet may have gone though its every motion could be tracked real-time and anywhere in the world with off-the-shelf technology. Yet, at the same time, we’re seeing tracking details of every person who was on that plane – who they are, where they have been, passport information, relatives, etc.

Something’s wrong with this picture.

do!

Mar 11, 2014 11:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
MarkmBha1 wrote:

A real mystery.

Mar 11, 2014 11:57am EDT  --  Report as abuse
wonderinghow wrote:

Since no one else is saying it, I will. Two young men, Arabic in appearance with stolen IDs on a plane that went missing. Gee. Why is it we have to work our way towards the conclusion it may be terrorists. Why don’t we start there and work outward? It’d save time.

Mar 11, 2014 12:00pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bailandolee wrote:

lots of theories….but the transponder was turned off? Not much has been mentioned about the very young co-pilot. Earlier news reports said he was 27 yrs old and had a fraction of the flying time of the pilot (18,000 hours). What if the pilot had to use the restroom and the co-pilot had ‘other plans’?

Mar 11, 2014 12:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dave148109 wrote:

The only scenario which seems to make sense right now is a pilot flew the plane to a secret location and landed it, whether for terrorism, money, or another reason.

Mar 11, 2014 12:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
koam wrote:

Why publish this article without a map showing where the named places are?

Mar 11, 2014 12:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Vijaybobhate wrote:

In my opinion :
1. The flight was not sunk into the water as there are always floating objects used in the plane. So gradually over a period of time the floating objects will come out of water.
2. Even if flight has high speed, once entered into the water, the speed drops down because of an impact of water. At the same time due to heavy impact there are chances of explosion or bursting on the surface of water. Due to which the remains of flight will keep floating on water scattered all around.
3. The search operation is done far away from the site.
4. Find out about the background of crew members as there are chances of their involvement in hijacking. Please find out their communication records.
5. Find out the communication records of all passengers by tracking there mobile phone records. This can be done by their country of origin and share with investing agencies.
6. There are chances of landing this flight to some airport or landed or crashed on preplanned destination.

Mar 11, 2014 12:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

The stolen passports were reported two years ago, and have ID numbers associated. The easiest program in the world to write is:

“If scanned number = lost number, then action = notify.” The NSA can build a 40 billion dollar data-mining center, pick through our call meta-data, but the above ATM card concept (in use for over 20 years) just blows their mind?

More to this story than meets the eye.

Mar 11, 2014 12:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jcwright wrote:

@AlkalineState — The stolen passports were Italian and Austrian, not US. The US no-fly list only applies to commercial flights leaving or entering US airspace.

Mar 11, 2014 12:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dd606 wrote:

AlkalineState wrote: So all this phone spying, computer spying, and no-fly list nonsense from American intel agencies and…. two dudes flying with stolen American passports does not raise any red flags? Either the CIA is as incompetent as they appear, or there’s a lot more to this story.”

===========

Yes, that’s right AS… The CIA and NSA are tracking every single illegal immigrant, con artist and petty thief, on planet earth. That’s realistic to think that. They also track everyone who has cheated on a DMV test, parked in a red zone, or ripped off the tag on their mattress.

Mar 11, 2014 12:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sego wrote:

I’m betting on a insider hijack. They turned off or jammed all communications and flew the plane to a landing strip and then covered it. We’ll find out sooner or later. Hope the passengers are ok.

Mar 11, 2014 12:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
118866 wrote:

Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Mar 11, 2014 12:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ananke wrote:

Yep, this looks more and more as insider hijack. The reported gas spots in the ocean is where the pilots released the extra fuel, and then probably landed on some ex military base in the jungle. No asphalt and navigation landing = they had to drop the fuel preparing for belly lending. Or, they experienced total electronic malfunction, and tried to land somewhere flying on manual, no navigation. It is possible, some natural phenomena as static electricity to electroshock them.

Mar 11, 2014 1:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gcf1965 wrote:

The passports were reported stolen and in the database, however, the local authorities and airport dropped the ball by not ensuring these resources were available and used as means of verification. The failure had NOTHTING to do with any US agency. Nice try though Alkaline.

Mar 11, 2014 1:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Owkrender wrote:

Straits of Malacca? Sounds like PIRACY to me… .What a haul!

Mar 11, 2014 1:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SaveRMiddle wrote:

@ spreadthewealth…

Thanks for sharing. Incredible. YouTube offers 55 seconds showing a Boeing plant covered with a pretend neighborhood. Actual film from 1940′s.

Is it completely unrealistic to hope this missing jet landed someplace undetected? How wonderful that would be.

Mar 11, 2014 1:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

Federal Register: Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized Internal Access

“This proposed data network and design integration may result in security vulnerabilities from intentional or unintentional corruption of data and systems critical to the safety and maintenance of the airplane. The existing regulations and guidance material did not anticipate this type of system architecture or electronic access to aircraft systems. Furthermore, regulations and current system safety assessment policy and techniques do not address potential security vulnerabilities, which could be caused by unauthorized access to aircraft data buses and servers.”

Mar 11, 2014 1:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
verdegeo wrote:

The Strait of Mulacca is only 25 meters deep at most and the height of a Boeing 777 tail is 18 meters with the wheels on the plane. It would be easily spotted in that shallow water.

Mar 11, 2014 1:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
NSJ4 wrote:

The fact that the plane apparently flew hundreds of miles off course with its transponder and ACARS transmitter disabled indicates this was definitely a highjacking, likely by one or both of the pilots, since other highjackers would have been unlikely to know how to switch off both of those devices.

Mar 11, 2014 2:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
JedStarnes wrote:

“…Southeast Asia is known as a hub for false documents that are also used by smugglers, illegal migrants and asylum seekers.”

Yeah, they usually end up in Indonesia. And then later, on to Hawaii.

Mar 11, 2014 2:10pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlanaF wrote:

So much for one of the men looking like that black Italian athlete.

Mar 11, 2014 2:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sothca wrote:

Sounds more and more like a hijacking. Also supposedly there was an Iranian on-board who was seeking political asylum!

Mar 11, 2014 2:24pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
JoeObserver wrote:

Here’s a theory. The flight encountered communication failure for some reason as it entered into the Vietnamese airspace. At this point the plane lost contact with the ATC. The pilot tried to fix the issue but without success. By that time the plane was already entering to South China sea no fly zone. The chinese demanded identity of the flight. But obviously the pilot couldn’t communicate. At this point the pilot decided to return to the base. The chinese thought this was a US spy plane or drone, so they shoot a massive missile with the capability to obliterate the object. Then the Chinese realised they have mistakely shot down their own people. So a few days of silence, followed by cover ups, contradicting report etc.. Why not yet searched in the South China sea?

Mar 11, 2014 2:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
braennvin2 wrote:

AlanaF, you took the words right out of my mouth/keyboard! Neither one looks remotely like the black soccer player.

Ananke – they tested the oil slicks in the water and it wasn’t jet fuel, so they didn’t dump any extra fuel there.

Mar 11, 2014 2:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
BHinLV wrote:

Why did it take 4 days (wasting all that critical time and resources) for the Malaysian govt to let everyone know the plane was at least 200 miles away in an entirely different area???

Mar 11, 2014 2:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
NSJ4 wrote:

The governments of Vietnam and China, as well as passengers’ relatives, should be seriously upset with the Malaysian government for for causing them to spend several days and millions of dollars searching the wrong areas when the Malaysia military apparently knew the plane had turned around and flown hundreds of miles from its last reported position.

Mar 11, 2014 2:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
notz wrote:

Transponder turned off, cell phones still ring, they landed somewhere. Duh.

Mar 11, 2014 3:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

gcf1965 writes: “The failure had NOTHTING to do with any US agency…”

Good to know. I’ll keep a bookmark to this page, so that in 3 hours when you guys start crying it was Obama’s fault…. I can help you with your past selves :)

Mar 11, 2014 3:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
morbas wrote:

We love a mystery. Just suppose MH370 was given a new flight vector and the crew used the new altitude as heading and new direction as altitude? Vectoring east would be a very small number, and altitude a very large number thus off they go at tree top at 250 degrees. Bye Bye.

Mar 11, 2014 3:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sjfella wrote:

Makes you wonder why all these billions are spent on so-called security.

Mar 11, 2014 3:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gcf1965 wrote:

Sometimes that is the reality Alkaline, in this case, the US passport holders did their part, the US agencies did their part. As much as I dislike obama/democrat idealogy/liberalism, this is a case where poor security in a Malaysian airport failed. Barring their turning over security to US officials (will not and should not happen) there is nothing more we could do, even obama.

Mar 11, 2014 3:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Explorer2014 wrote:

This is quite interesting that the flight was flying at a lower altitude. How about this idea: Someone on the plane (either hijacker or terrorist group) took control over the plane, cut all the communications from the transponder and back up, diverted the plane and landed it somewhere either on the ocean (later to sink) or on a small island and hide it to use it for future planning of a terrorist attack? Or a dry run to do something like this in mid-air loose all communication and create something like 9-11 again. This was civilian air traffic will not know anything only military could detect it but if they fly low potentially detection could be avoided.

Mar 11, 2014 3:42pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Nicarol wrote:

I’m still putting my money on the “religion of peace” being responsible.

Mar 11, 2014 3:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheAnalyst wrote:

Just to correct one minor error: Civilian radar does have a primary capability, and the route surveillance air traffic radar is fully capable of tracking an object for hundreds of miles at sufficient altitude. Military radar has historically just been ahead of the curve, and for good reason. Military installation placements also dictate better intrusion coverage at lower altitudes, up to and including surface tracking. Interestingly enough, the Vietnamese Navy reported the aircraft low in altitude up around Cambodia. Who knows what course this flight was on, but it seems to be awfully astonishing that it was able to continue forward for such a distance all the while avoiding civilian air traffic control radar. Either the air traffic radar coverage in the area is horrendously weak, and/or somebody was purposely keeping that plane extremely low for a reason.

Mar 11, 2014 4:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
liveoaktx wrote:

sounds like a hiJack with the transponder turned off. That plane could be on the ground. Very small chance…but pray for folks alive

Mar 11, 2014 4:24pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Observering wrote:

Wonder if anyone with BitCoin Connection to the missing $500 Million was onboard ?

Mar 11, 2014 4:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dd606 wrote:

If it really turns out that it ended up in this totally different spot… their military needs to explain why it took them three days to say that. A complete power failure could have shut down all the avionics, but I have a hard time believing they flew over that much land, without somebody on the plane connecting with a cell site, like they did in the 9/11 planes. Even in a remote area, that altitude would probably allow a quick connection periodically.

Mar 11, 2014 5:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

This plane did not appear on radar for two hours, then disappear from radar. That only happens when it’s 1974 outside.

The entire globe is under radar and satellite surveillance. The plane’s course is on a U.S. military database somewhere, that you can be sure of. Why they are not talking is because they are probably involved.

Mar 11, 2014 5:09pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ronryegadfly wrote:

Starting to look like this couldn’t be anything but a hijacking. Why would Malaysia conceal the fact that they traced the plane all the way back to an island in the middle of the Strait of Malacca? And how could the plane disappear from their military radar at that spot, which is so very close to Malaysia’s western shore? Is there an airstrip on all of Sumatra long enough to accommodate a 777?

Mar 11, 2014 5:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Explorer2014 wrote:

what if the plane actually landed & someone/group is trying to hide it in one of the remote islands. May be it is a dry run to see how to make a flight disappear in flight.

Mar 11, 2014 5:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
yeshi wrote:

What if someone stole it and killed all the passengers, now someone has a 777 flying bomb like on 9-11. What if it shows up on radar and heads for a big city, of course they will let it land and as it approaches it veers off and hits a soft target, people.

Mar 11, 2014 5:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SonsiMehenna wrote:

Starting to wonder if Malaysia accidentally shot that one down. Hope not.

Mar 11, 2014 5:31pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dd606 wrote:

AlkalineState wrote: This plane did not appear on radar for two hours, then disappear from radar. That only happens when it’s 1974 outside. The entire globe is under radar and satellite surveillance. The plane’s course is on a U.S. military database somewhere, that you can be sure of. Why they are not talking is because they are probably involved.”

============

No, the world is not under 100% radar/surveillance coverage. You have been watching too many movies. Oceanic routes still use shortwave as a form of voice communications, which is often not the greatest. Any possible imagery they MIGHT have accidentally gotten, would probably take days to go through and find. Any discrepancies coming from that region, is most likely due to politics and incompetence.

I’m thinking there may have been some bizarre scenario, that resembles the private jet incident, where it depressurized and continued flying. Possibly everyone on-board becoming incapacitated from smoke or depressurization, and then the plane somehow managed to keep continuing on for a time.

Mar 11, 2014 5:31pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bgbs wrote:

How can they not know? Is it not 2014? Look, the NSA knows everything about me to about an inch of an accuracy, and they cannot find a massive plane? Something smells fishy.

Mar 11, 2014 5:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MrLe wrote:

I’m Vietnamese. I don’t know what happened, but i know in this time there a lot of battleship in our ocean: Us, China, Malaysia, Australia … and they will stay here for a long time.
Please think about this by other way !

Mar 11, 2014 6:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheAnalyst wrote:

Just to clarify: Civilian radar does have a primary capability, and the route surveillance air traffic radar is fully capable of tracking an object for hundreds of miles at sufficient altitude sans transponder. Military radar has historically just been ahead of the curve with regards to such capabilities, and for good reason. Military installation placements also dictate better intrusion coverage at lower altitudes, down to and including surface tracking. Interestingly enough, early on the Vietnamese Navy reported the aircraft low in altitude up north towards Cambodia, which is also where the slick and debris were found (Although reports have since stated that testing allegedly ruled out the slick belonging to MH370). Who knows what course this flight was on, but it seems to be awfully astonishing that it was able to continue forward for such a distance all the while avoiding civilian air traffic control radar. Either the air traffic radar coverage/capability in the area is lacking, and/or somebody was purposely keeping that plane extremely low for a reason. Military radar should absolutely provide for a more thorough answer, and I hope we find answers soon, as well as possibly a miracle.

Mar 11, 2014 6:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
baltfl wrote:

It seems from the last location where they had communication and the military radar location, they might have been heading for the National Forest of Sumatra. Have they considered the possibility that after the pilots lost communication, they figured the best option of location to attempt to land would have been in a remote national forest where they wouldn’t be likely to land on buildings and kill people on the ground in addition to any deaths onboard? Since they were from Malaysia, they might have known that location.

Mar 11, 2014 6:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ChangB wrote:

Somalia!

Mar 11, 2014 6:10pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
stringed wrote:

If the Malaysian military attache is correct, flying at such a low altitude would allow it to evade radar. Radar is line of sight and beyond the horizon, is blind.

I think this is beginning to sound like something truly out of a James Bond novel. A hijacked jumbo jet’s transponder manually shut off. The plane diverted to an obscure airstrip on a forgotten Indonesian archipelago. Iranian agents secretly load their newly built nuke aboard and fly it to Israel or even the Great Satan with hostage passengers aboard to prevent being taken down by interceptors.

I hope the free nations of the world are extremely vigilant about their airspace over the next few days. This could turn out even more horrible than just the tragic crash of a jetliner.

Mar 11, 2014 6:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SaveRMiddle wrote:

Assuming most of these details are true……there are far too many out of pattern circumstances happening with this jet’s activity for this to be mechanical. Those poor waiting relatives.

Mar 11, 2014 6:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AuntieMarxist wrote:

Just gets thicker by the moment. Remember when the Russians shot down the Korean airliner back in the 80′s? Within days the Regan administration had the complete dialogue of the Russian pilot with Soviet ground control recorded and aired at the UN. If these assertions can be verified, it would suggest a hi-jack attempt to an as yet undisclosed location. The fact that the aircraft was at low altitude suggests attempted radar evasion. In terms of lack of information, something in this whole mixture does not compute.

Mar 11, 2014 6:35pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AuntieMarxist wrote:

Just gets thicker by the moment. Remember when the Russians shot down the Korean airliner back in the 80′s? Within days the Regan administration had the complete dialogue of the Russian pilot with Soviet ground control recorded and aired at the UN. If these assertions can be verified, it would suggest a hi-jack attempt to an as yet undisclosed location. The fact that the aircraft was at low altitude suggests attempted radar evasion. In terms of lack of information, something in this whole mixture does not compute.

Mar 11, 2014 6:35pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
burnast wrote:

It is the 4th day and only now we know that the aircraft has changed course and travelled for more than an hour. The attitude of some of the spokesperson are authoritarian and appear to be enjoying the attention they are receiving and showing off the multi-coloured badges. Wake up Malaysia.

Mar 11, 2014 6:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
KM14JH wrote:

News media continue to mention an electrical issue as a possible answer yet I continue to wonder about a computer hacking issue since the plane was just checked out allowing access to plane systems. If two men with false documents can get aboard the plane how secure was the access to the plane itself? I commented yesterday in an article that the plane was most likely turned around once it went off radar. Was the missing plane the possible terrorist threat or is the plane a potential terrorist threat? My prayers continue to be with the family and friends of all those on the plane.

Mar 11, 2014 6:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Tomwaintow wrote:

This is a very good article in that it looks at this event as pointing to a fact the reason for the movement of the aircraft is a mystery and MUST be investigated. This has happened before over the past 40 years and in one caase it was verified that it involved attempt to mislead a Spy Plane it caused a civilian craft Airliner to move wrong resulting in it being shot down. This movment based on my experience in Radar tells me that could be the case here. Time will tell. The fact China is becoming involve means this is a very very very important event based on security. If you have ever flow on a 777 you can be aware of the fact this plane is unique in its security set up. Lets hope this plane gets found and we discover what is REALLY going on. Keep the families and people in your prayer this is a very tragic incident and may be an attempt to cover up a bad move by someone.

Mar 11, 2014 7:00pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

dd606, are you asserting that where radar contact was ‘lost’ for this plane, there is no radar coverage available? The plane did a near u-turn and went back over land again. Why would there be no radar coverage there? In fact, there is radar coverage there. The malaysian military is not denying that.

Mar 11, 2014 7:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bob9999 wrote:

It might be that the plane seen on Malaysian military radar was not the same plane. If it was, than the plane was seen on radar more than an hour after the transponder stopped sending. That suggests that the transponder was deliberately turned off, because the 777 apparently would not be flyable if the entire electrical system was shut down. In addition, on report said that the plane was apparently headed towards the Indian Ocean and not back in the direction of Kuala Lumpur. None of that makes sense. Also, the pilot or crew (or passengers) could have used their mobile phones to call for help if they had wanted to report an emergency. (Why didn’t they?)

Mar 11, 2014 7:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bobox wrote:

I firmly believe that aliens are responsible!

Mar 11, 2014 7:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Bob9999 writes: “It might be that the plane seen on Malaysian military radar was not the same plane.”

Totally possible. But ver unlikely. This is a plane picked up on primary radar, right where the plane that had been transponding on secondary radar…. left off.

Car turns off its lights and the cop sees a black car-sized object traveling from that point forward on the road…. he’s probably got the right car. Could be some fancy switch-a-roo in there but…. not likely. This is the plane.

Mar 11, 2014 7:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TPL wrote:

AlkalineState, radar coverage can be subject to many things. Typically, military based radar is far more capable of detecting and tracking aircraft/objects. The military and civilian ATC both possess primary and secondary radar (The newer civilian primaries are 3D, which means they can also track altitude without transponder data, which is a capability that the military has possessed for quite a while now), but civilian ATC relies upon secondary to a greater extent due to the nature of their job (Their foremost responsibility is to direct civil air traffic, while the military’s is to both detect threats and vector their response towards it). The military also has a wider variety of radar capabilities, including shipborne and ground-based mobile, both of which are highly capable of following an object at lower altitudes and in fact at surface level. Civilian ATC typically utilizes different radars and even separate ATC facilities for in-close terminal guidance vs. long-distance en-route surveillance, while on-board a Naval vessel for example (At least a USN one), you’ll find everything operating as a solid cohesive package or unit. I’d be very surprised if the militaries of Vietnam and Malaysia did not track this craft or its remnants, and did so to a much better degree than their civilian ATC counterparts back at Subang ATC (Of which FLT MH370 was at its surveillance limits), and elsewhere. Just to clarify, I’m not knocking either entity nor the personnel who work for them, because both jobs (Civilian and military radar/ATC operations) are immensely intense, but due to the nature of the job and their primary objectives they have differing capabilities and coverage.

Mar 11, 2014 7:33pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cccoldnwet wrote:

Looking at Google Earth, there is a 13,000 ft runway north of Konarak, Iran, at the southern end of Iran. Looks like a military jet parked outside a hangar there. This is within the approx 5500 NM range of the 777 last known (published) position, even if you fly around the south end of India. I think somebody knows where this plane is.

Mar 11, 2014 7:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ronryegadfly wrote:

Maybe the object the Vietnamese authorities thought they saw in the water really was a door from an airliner, as they thought. Maybe someone opened a passenger door or it came open somehow on its own in flight. That would cause the depressurization that would incapacitate the passengers and crew. After that the plane veered off course on its own, gradually losing altitude until it crashed who knows where in southeast Indian Ocean miles form nowhere.

Mar 11, 2014 7:43pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Hatchi wrote:

The Plane is siting on an Irainian Military base

Mar 11, 2014 7:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gbd wrote:

catastrophic mechanical failure,what does that mean actually. I work on aircraft for a living. There is nothing mechanical that would make a plane vanish. Also even the sad day when value jet nose dived into a swamp there was plenty of wreckage. COVER UP WAKE UP!

Mar 11, 2014 7:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

I wonder, were that plane to refuel somewhere in the strait, could it reach europe or north america on that one fuel load, assuming it could fly undetected the whole way.

Mar 11, 2014 8:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dynoman wrote:

I heard the plan never ever took off! this is all a hoax

Mar 11, 2014 8:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bakhtin wrote:

Bob9999

The Boeing 777 has mechanical backup. It can be flown with 100% electrical failure.

Mar 11, 2014 8:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
FarkNGenius wrote:

A Novel- “By order of the President” written by W.E.B. Griffin. Terrorists steal a jumbo jet and re-paint it to use in a terrorst attack. Life immitating art? just saying… anyone read it?

Mar 11, 2014 8:33pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Robbie72 wrote:

The aircraft had 7+ hours of fuel to fly to Beijing, so if her transponders suddenly shut down and she turns west…under the cover of darkness….that would give her enough range to make it to Somalia/Yemen/Oman.

Has anyone thought about doing some satellite or drone passes over those areas???

We can’t seem to find her anywhere else, so I think the next reasonable search area would be the global hub of modern terrorism….

Mar 11, 2014 8:41pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dynoman wrote:

I heard the plan never ever took off! this is all a hoax

Mar 11, 2014 8:42pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cccoldnwet wrote:

There is a 13,000 ft airstrip north of Konarak in Southern Iran. This is within range of the 777′s last known position, flying over water all the way.

Mar 11, 2014 8:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dynoman wrote:

I am wondering how reliable this new information is that it was been flying so far off course. Why is it just coming out now? Kind of strange if you ask me. I dont believe much the news says. The news doesnt state how these findings were exactly made. All it tells us is what a military officer says. They sure fail to mention much of anything about how this military came up with this information to give it some credit

Mar 11, 2014 8:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mrdarklight wrote:

Two Iranians flying on the aircraft with stolen passports… why the media insists on pretending there’s any other cause for this is baffling. They do this every time now. The evidence that it was a Muslim terrorist is overwhelming and yet they cannot bring themselves to face this reality.

Mar 11, 2014 8:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

Malaysian military, Why didn’t you send up jets to find out why a commercial jet went that far off course AND loses contact? Did no one think, Gosh maybe we should check this out?

Mar 11, 2014 9:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

Malaysian military, Why didn’t you send up jets to find out why a commercial jet went that far off course AND loses contact? Did no one think, Gosh maybe we should check this out?

Mar 11, 2014 9:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

Malaysian military, Why didn’t you send up jets to find out why a commercial jet went that far off course AND loses contact? Did no one think, Gosh maybe we should check this out?

Mar 11, 2014 9:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

It’s not such a small world, after all.

Mar 11, 2014 9:33pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Markstomars wrote:

If the plane is in fact on earth and on earth in this given century considering had it exploded there would have been evidence within hours and found by one of ten nations looking at least fuel but none has been found so unless they toss something in waters to make it look that way to prevent a panic and pass blame, the plane story will continue and what concerns me is not if it was abducted by aliens or caught in a time warp from time travelers of future but rather if it has been hijacked and was flown at low altitudes by terrorists to avoid radar and then landed safely somewhere intended. I understand it is possible to hijack those computer systems and take control over that kind of aircraft. If in fact it was hijacked as large as it is, it must be found quickly imo because terrorists would likely have more reason for that plane than to get money and just one nuke on that plane over a City which btw is where nukes do most damage in the air not ground, would likely cause a given nation the most series crisis they ever had and a nuke would be child’s play compared to other devices that could send a nation back 200 years without electrics or batteries able to work for a thousand years to come.

They need to be looking on the GROUND somewhere for this thing to be safe for all of us in any Western nation which of course is where terrorists tend to attack. I’m sure homeland security is thinking about these possibilities but if not, we now have given them something to think about to help us all! I want this plane found if in fact it is on earth and of this time no matter if it broke up or is in one solid condition ready to be used against us which is you and me.

This entire situation is becoming more of a concern each day but if governments end up believing alien abduction they will at least put some bait out there to make it look like the plane went down however; governments are not up to date on time travel. That would just be of fantasy, movies or some nut of course JMO

Let’s get this puzzle solved now!

Mar 11, 2014 11:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
antiaerosols wrote:

Or,the plane never existed.

Mar 11, 2014 12:46am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Markku_Canada wrote:

There was an air worthiness directive issued by USA regulators about a possible weakness in older 777′s . Only the first part of the inspection was performed on this airplane. The second part of the inspection was slated for a later date. The airworthiness directive was issued last year, so it could be failure of the aircraft hull that caused a midair breakup . Perhaps the pilots were about to turn back and had already lost some electronics due to cut cables or compromised structures. And sometime after they turned around the airplane broke up in the sky. If the cell phones are still ringing but not answering it could mean the airplane crashed on land not the sea.

Mar 12, 2014 1:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
paintcan wrote:

None of the articles so far has said how old the plane was. Perhaps the plane cracked up and then exploded in a ball of flame and that would account for why no debris has been found? Fabrics burned and plastics could have melted and become dense balls of debris? All the metal parts of course would sink with the bodies. there may be a lot of other garbage and debris in the waters off Malaysia. They don’t have strict environmental laws and so much of the garbage in the Pacific gyres comes from the Asian Pacific coast. All the other major oceans and seas apparently have smaller gyres.

They may not be able to distinguish the wreckage from the other garbage even if it is all very diffuse?

Not all black boxes were intended to emit signals. Maybe it’s an older version? They are only supposed to record the actions of the plane. They may not be able to recover it. The age of the plane should be discovered by now. It may not have been getting regular maintenance. They are a very populous region of the earth and all facilities and equipment intended for public use get a very thorough workout. The airlines may be working them,literally, to death.

Liability on the part of the airlines may cause many people, including the military to make up stories or to try to obscure the actual events. It is very naive to expect them all to tell the truth. This is the Far East. This is the area where ferries loaded with passengers sink fairly often and where human trafficking still occurs. The authorities may not be nearly as concerned for the loss of life and they are for the loss of their our livelihoods and their freedom.

@Alkaline Sate – the CIA doesn’t rule the known universe.

Mar 12, 2014 1:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bakhtin wrote:

paintcan… the plane was 11 years old, according to at least one of the articles.

Maintenance at Malaysia Airlines seems to be pretty good, at least if their safety record is used as a proxy. They get 6/7 for safety at www.airlineratings.com, and 5 stars from www.airlinequality.com – ahead of American Airlines or Lufthansa for example. In short, their safety record is excellent.

You really should check these things before dismissing the entire ‘Far East’ as junk, populated by liars.

Mar 12, 2014 2:30am EDT  --  Report as abuse
NowYouKnow wrote:

Do ya wonder why it took this long to get this big news from the military that routinely looks at every square inch of air space over there? I guess….nobody asked them. And this makes it sound like some sort of hijacking.

Mar 12, 2014 10:05am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.