Two-week search for Malaysian jet finds only frustration and suspicion

Comments (46)

Was it a mini-bast from the Sun that nobody noticed and wrecked much of the aircraft’s delicate technology, meaning the direction it flew was uncontrollable and finally crashed into the water in a place we’ll never know about?
Meanwhile, 20 months ago, our planet came within a week of never again watching a jet airliner scouring the atmosphere:
According to a major scientific magazine, a massive ejection of material from the sun initially traveling at over 7 million miles per hour that narrowly missed Earth last year is an event solar scientists hope will open the eyes of policymakers regarding the impacts and mitigation of severe space weather, says a University of Colorado Boulder professor.

The coronal mass ejection, or CME, event was likely more powerful than the famous Carrington storm of 1859, when the sun blasted Earth’s atmosphere hard enough twice to light up the sky from the North Pole to Central America and allowed New Englanders to read their newspapers at night by aurora light, said CU-Boulder Professor Daniel Baker. Had it hit Earth, the July 2012 event likely would have created a technological disaster by short-circuiting satellites, power grids, ground communication equipment and even threatening the health of astronauts and aircraft crews, he said.

CMEs are part of solar storms and can send billions of tons of solar particles in the form of gas bubbles and magnetic fields off the sun’s surface and into space. The storm events essentially peel Earth’s magnetic field like an onion, allowing energetic solar wind particles to stream down the field lines to hit the atmosphere over the poles.

Fortunately, the 2012 solar explosion occurred on the far side of the rotating sun just a week after that area was pointed toward Earth, said Baker, a solar scientist and the director of CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. But NASA’s STEREO-A, satellite that was flying ahead of the Earth as the planet orbited the sun, captured the event, including the intensity of the solar wind, the interplanetary magnetic field and a rain of solar energetic particles into space.

- See more at: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2013/12/09/cu-boulder-scientist-2012-solar-storm-points-need-society-prepare#sthash.

Mar 20, 2014 11:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

Was it a mini-bast from the Sun that nobody noticed and wrecked much of the aircraft’s delicate technology, meaning the direction it flew was uncontrollable and finally crashed into the water in a place we’ll never know about?
Meanwhile, 20 months ago, our planet came within a week of never again watching a jet airliner scouring the atmosphere:
According to a major scientific magazine, a massive ejection of material from the sun initially traveling at over 7 million miles per hour that narrowly missed Earth last year is an event solar scientists hope will open the eyes of policymakers regarding the impacts and mitigation of severe space weather, says a University of Colorado Boulder professor.

The coronal mass ejection, or CME, event was likely more powerful than the famous Carrington storm of 1859, when the sun blasted Earth’s atmosphere hard enough twice to light up the sky from the North Pole to Central America and allowed New Englanders to read their newspapers at night by aurora light, said CU-Boulder Professor Daniel Baker. Had it hit Earth, the July 2012 event likely would have created a technological disaster by short-circuiting satellites, power grids, ground communication equipment and even threatening the health of astronauts and aircraft crews, he said.

CMEs are part of solar storms and can send billions of tons of solar particles in the form of gas bubbles and magnetic fields off the sun’s surface and into space. The storm events essentially peel Earth’s magnetic field like an onion, allowing energetic solar wind particles to stream down the field lines to hit the atmosphere over the poles.

Fortunately, the 2012 solar explosion occurred on the far side of the rotating sun just a week after that area was pointed toward Earth, said Baker, a solar scientist and the director of CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. But NASA’s STEREO-A, satellite that was flying ahead of the Earth as the planet orbited the sun, captured the event, including the intensity of the solar wind, the interplanetary magnetic field and a rain of solar energetic particles into space.

- See more at: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2013/12/09/cu-boulder-scientist-2012-solar-storm-points-need-society-prepare#sthash.

Mar 20, 2014 11:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
afoose wrote:

…………of course, that CME occurred in 2012.

Mar 21, 2014 1:05am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bakhtin wrote:

There are way too many crackpot theories over this, including from Malaysian authorities.

This is not the first time an airliner has gone completely dark. It happened in 1998, on Swiss Air flight near Nova Scotia. They too lost transponder and ACARS because of… an electrical fire. No need to invent imaginary terrorists or imaginary suicidal pilots.

What does a competent pilot do if his plane sets on fire? Gets the damn thing on the ground ASAP, at the nearest airport. The nearest airport for MH370 was Langkawi. Long runway and an approach over the sea. That is why the plane turned: he was heading for Langkawi.

Oxygen masks cannot be used when the plane is on fire, but pilots have (or should have) smoke hoods that give them maybe 15 minutes. After that, everyone was overcome by smoke and fumes and the plane, on autopilot, continued right past Langkawi and out over the Indian Ocean.

Even the reports of changes in altitude fit in. If the climb to 45,000 feet happened, it would make sense in terms of starving the fire of oxygen. Flying at that height takes a lot of skill, so the subsequent rapid descent was either a stall or the cabin depressurised.

Mar 21, 2014 4:24am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Verpoly wrote:

Naive Aussies in high profile held press conference to proudly announce their miraculous discovery and then what ? Not even a piece of junk vest is picked up.

A week ago the Chinese satellite also captured image of 2 sea objects, and instructed Malaysia and Vietnam to retrieve but end up with nothing found. Whichever country detects something first has the primary duty to grab from ocean before anything said. China and Australia should know these objects only float for limited time, and move swiftly with monsoon currents.

Early this week, Malaysia just said MH370 plunged to sea pretty intact in good shape, and now Australia claims they found a long piece of side wing, things just don’t add up. The mystery is complicated by too many unfounded speculations from all sources.

I must admit the public is somewhat fed up with this kind of “satellite bluffing”. Shouldn’t these countries announce discovery of anything when they really got possession of it ? Just keep mouth shut when the thing is not on hand.

Mar 21, 2014 6:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
margiel wrote:

My theory: if you want to make a statement by crashing an airplane, you tell people your reason? Why bother to turn off the transponders unless you plan to actually BE somewhere and don’t want to be found – it’s not as though anyone could actually force him to safely land the plane. The only other possibility would be expecting Thailand or Indonesia, or maybe even the hapless Malaysians, to shoot the plane down believing it was an attack. The transponder had to be purposefully shut down because its wiring is the same as the wiring for the final ping beacon so a fire would have taken them all out. I lean toward the pilot taking the plane north somewhere.

Mar 21, 2014 8:04am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Maybe there’s a blue hole in the Indian Ocean. Ask CNN …

Mar 21, 2014 8:06am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

margiel – If the pilot wanted to kill himself he might want his family to get the life insurance. If the plane is never found then no one can prove suicide. I still think it’s landed on one of those small islands.

Mar 21, 2014 8:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

margiel – If the pilot wanted to kill himself he might want his family to get the life insurance. If the plane is never found then no one can prove suicide. I still think it’s landed on one of those small islands.

Mar 21, 2014 8:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

margiel – If the pilot wanted to kill himself he might want his family to get the life insurance. If the plane is never found then no one can prove suicide. I still think it’s landed on one of those small islands.

Mar 21, 2014 8:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RUKidding9 wrote:

margiel – If the pilot wanted to kill himself he might want his family to get the life insurance. If the plane is never found then no one can prove suicide. I still think it’s landed on one of those small islands.

Mar 21, 2014 8:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
paintcan wrote:

No one is looking north toward the Himalayas? One earlier article mentioned that the Chinese are looking at land masses and they aren’t mentioned again. The reliability of any part of the information released so far doesn’t argue that the Malaysians, or any of the international team, have the slightest idea what thy are doing.

If the plane could backtrack and not “veer west” according to the flightpath shown in this paper yesterday, no one knows a thing. The plane didn’t show up on radar again with or without a transponder signal? It is possible, or was possible, for radar to see objects that don’t want to be seen. That’s what radar was invented to do in WWII. Are the Malaysians so sloppy they didn’t notice a large object flying back over Malaysian airspace? The Malaysian military doesn’t use radar that can spot objects without transponder signals? Doesn’t that sound more than a little stupid?

And the story is idiotic that a suicidal pilot, co-pilot, or someone else continued a flight for hours when they could easily have downed the plane after the first hour in the sea north of Malaysia? What, they wanted to linger as long as possible?

What’s the motivation, Mr. DeMille?

Mar 21, 2014 8:59am EDT  --  Report as abuse
waggg wrote:

They are grasping at straws. Have they checked Diego Garcia?

Mar 21, 2014 8:59am EDT  --  Report as abuse
paintcan wrote:

No one is looking north toward the Himalayas? One earlier article mentioned that the Chinese are looking at land masses and they aren’t mentioned again. The reliability of any part of the information released so far doesn’t argue that the Malaysians, or any of the international team, have the slightest idea what thy are doing.

If the plane could backtrack and not “veer west” according to the flightpath shown in this paper yesterday, no one knows a thing. The plane didn’t show up on radar again with or without a transponder signal? It is possible, or was possible, for radar to see objects that don’t want to be seen. That’s what radar was invented to do in WWII. Are the Malaysians so sloppy they didn’t notice a large object flying back over Malaysian airspace? The Malaysian military doesn’t use radar that can spot objects without transponder signals? Doesn’t that sound more than a little stupid?

And the story is idiotic that a suicidal pilot, co-pilot, or someone else continued a flight for hours when they could easily have downed the plane after the first hour in the sea north of Malaysia? What, they wanted to linger as long as possible?

Maybe they ought the check a hanger at the Kuala Lampur airport because the whole stunt was designed to show how inept air traffic control at the airport really was?

Mar 21, 2014 9:07am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Well DUH?! You think?

Is it common for heavy metal objects to sink?

Mar 21, 2014 9:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Well DUH?! You think?

Is it common for heavy metal objects to sink?

Mar 21, 2014 9:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Well DUH?! You think?

Is it common for heavy metal objects to sink?

Mar 21, 2014 9:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
chiliboots wrote:

The entire plane, its contents and all debris, “vaporized” when it hit, just as in the “plane” that struck the Pentagon. Now, move along; nothing to see, here.

Mar 21, 2014 9:35am EDT  --  Report as abuse
chiliboots wrote:

The entire plane, its contents and all debris, “vaporized” when it hit, just as in the “plane” that struck the Pentagon. Now, move along; nothing to see, here.

Mar 21, 2014 9:35am EDT  --  Report as abuse
LBlanks wrote:

Didn’t anyone consider this was debris from the Japan flooding that has been floating around the world since the tidal wave ?

Mar 21, 2014 9:46am EDT  --  Report as abuse
gregbrew56 wrote:

LBlanks – “Didn’t anyone consider this was debris from the Japan flooding that has been floating around the world since the tidal wave ?”

First thing I considered. This is like the Keystone Cops vs the Three Stooges: Lots of running around and yelling the latest hypotheses, while the audience tries not to laugh.

Mar 21, 2014 10:30am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JJErler wrote:

I can’t believe some of you people are still thinking this was an accident when all evidence points to a takeover by one of the pilots or someone else. Solar ejections don’t cause a plane to fly below radar on a path to avoid it. It’s nice how the media immediately jumps on this as evidence of a crash when there is none. IF the plane was hijacked then it’s more likely it did not crash. Transponders don’t get switched off by accident.

Mar 21, 2014 10:44am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sothca wrote:

“Australia’s deputy prime minister said the suspected debris may have sunk.”

I see that Australia, has geniuses in charge, like the USA. Your very own bumbling gaffing “Joe.?”

Mar 21, 2014 10:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
gerrydwelder wrote:

How to Steal an Airplane: From 9/11 to MH370

http://youtu.be/4Nt4Z1tUHgE

So when will we demand the NSA answer so many questions about current and past events? Isn’t it logical NSA has extensive communications on all events from 911 to Sandy Hook massacre?

Or is the NSA a toy only for the globalist elites that is paid for by US taxpayers?

What is NSA hiding about this:

Google:
Video: National School Safety Expert: Sandy Hook shooting was a fraud

Posted on February 19, 2014 by Carl Herman

“The FBI classified the report on Sandy Hook. This has never been done before, and indicates a cover-up of all the evidence that this was a staged event.”

“Mr. Halbig has the professional expertise to conclude the official story is impossible, and to demand arrests in order for the public to have the truth.”

Contact MSM and your local news channel, ask them why they’re avoiding this:

School Safety Expert Threatened for Questioning Official Narrative

http://youtu.be/rEfW9FvLyAg

-911

-Oklahoma City Bombing

-etc.

Mar 21, 2014 11:17am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Yes, it may have sunk.

But it may also have been disassembled and sold for parts.

Or it may be that whomever has it realizes that, unlike the USA, China is a force to be reckoned with and is fearful or desirous to keep its secret.

After all, most people didn’t know that — albeit temporarily — Gru actually shrunk and stole the moon.

Mar 21, 2014 11:18am EDT  --  Report as abuse
gerrydwelder wrote:

So we are to believe a country that gave up their guns and is under the queen’s thumb?

youtube: The Rothschilds Exposed 3/3

(Just see the last 3 minutes, you will understand the bigger picture)
http://youtu.be/47WM2BhklmM

youtube: Slave Queen
http://youtu.be/vrsfll_QLUw
by TruthNeverTold

Mar 21, 2014 11:19am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sivmevan wrote:

Have they looked for it at Diego Garcia?

Mar 21, 2014 11:24am EDT  --  Report as abuse

The evidence is overwhelming that the plane was hijacked. If the pilots or hijackers wanted to crash the plane into the ocean they wouldn’t have turned the plane around, and engaged in all the maneuvering they engaged in. They would not have flow the plane another seven hours. This theory makes no sense. You might as well propose the plane entered a rift in the space-time continuum and is now flying above an Earth inhabited by dinosaurs.

Mar 21, 2014 11:35am EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Doesn’t matter what debris they find now, all the people are dead and the plane is at the bottom of the ocean. All that work that went into finding the Brazilian plane a couple years back…. we learned nothing. Planes still wreck, and no one came back to life. Call this off. After day 13, it’s just a sick obsession.

Mar 21, 2014 11:38am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Empress_Trudy wrote:

The Guardian of course blamed that on Israel and the Jews in general.

Mar 21, 2014 11:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
milkel wrote:

If the plane was highjacked, by now the highjackers would surely have made their demands, otherwise why would they simply continue feeding 240 people for 15 days for nothing? Secondly, for a plane to be highjacked and taken to some spot, is more difficult coz in that case the flight recorder signals would have been picked up. Therefore the theory that the plane met a very sad and unfortunate end in the ocean seems increasingly believable, much as all of us wud hate to think so.

Mar 21, 2014 12:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
uisignorant wrote:

Unless the plane went down intact, it is impossible for everything to sink.

Mar 21, 2014 1:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sabrefencer wrote:

Another day, another dollar…the world turns…the plot doesn’t thicken, the plot doesn’t thin..it just???????

Mar 21, 2014 2:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
disenwit wrote:

This disappearance was caused by Obama, who needed to get the country’s mind off of Obamacare.

Mar 21, 2014 2:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
robb1 wrote:

Those big debris off Australia were not from the plane.

You should have at least some seats bottoms, suitcases and some live/dead bodies floating around for months, together in the same area, easy to spot by a plane.

They should look as far as the north Africa east coast were pirates take ships.

Mar 21, 2014 4:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
GreaterGood wrote:

Let’s assume, for a second, that the flight trajectory to the south is valid. Now we have to take a leap of faith that someone who had intimate details of the flight control systems of a 777 re-programmed the autopilot. Jump even further that this person(s) wanted to commit suicide but didn’t care that they were taking 240 other people with them. At this time, their motivations are the stuff of wild speculation. But let’s say that you wanted the plane to disappear. You would fly the plane to the farthest reaches of its fuel supply to the deepest part of the Indian Ocean: Diamantina Trench. Oddly enough, west southwest of Perth. Right about where they thought they saw debris. I agree with other comments that you would find quite a bit more debris floating about than just a large bit of plane, but it almost makes sense. So, how do you do it? Set the autopilot with the desired route, ‘somehow’ flush the oxygen from the cabin. This would initially incapacitate everyone (quite quickly), but eventually killing them. The plane continues on its route until it runs out of fuel. It still doesn’t pass the sniff test of ‘why’ you would do it, but it is plausible.

Mar 21, 2014 5:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
freeokinawa wrote:

This looks more and more like deliberate Malaysian government cover up to avoid liabilities.

The Malaysian government firstly delay radar tracking information of up to 70 minutes which shows plane change course to west till out of range off Pulau Perak. They knew plane climbing to 45000 feet means death to passengers by decompression so they hide this fact initially.

Now it looks like another Malaysian plane coming back from Saudi Arabia with a Muslim woman who saw a plane like wing and tail floating in the ocean was discredited by pilot and air stewardess, told to go to sleep. This appears to be instruction given by Malaysian government/airline to tell flight crew not to report any sightings.

Given this woman is Muslim and just come back from Mecca, she appears to be telling the truth and the plane location should be investigated somewhere in the Andaman Islands area, not a diversionary tactic to search far away off Australia.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2586013/Malaysian-woman-claims-seen-missing-MH370-water-near-Andaman-Islands-day-disappeared.html

Mar 21, 2014 6:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Kahnie wrote:

Hollywood awaits the script. Especially those who specialize in Fantasy and Sci-Fi.

Mar 21, 2014 7:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SKYDRIFTER wrote:

One “item” hasn’t been addressed in the disappearance of Flight 370.

Supposedly, an automatic satellite position reporting system, “ADS-B” (Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast) was (additionally) required equipment. That system would be totally independent of the ‘traditional’ radar transponder; and its data – or absence thereof – crucial.

So, what is the “official” account for that system & associated data? Why hasn’t it even been discussed? Such is not a “minor” matter.

Mar 21, 2014 8:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Glummulf wrote:

One thing I find troubling.

The media has treated this matter quite differently from other disappearances.

Most of the time, such disappearances were updated about once a week or month, unless there were actually developments in the case.

This time, every day, and often more than once a day, it’s been updated with, well, nothing. Theories, possibilities, but nothing concrete. In the past it would have been mostly ignored by the media unless actual facts came to light.

The obvious question is: what celebrity or politician was on the aircraft? Given the media’s lack of morals and lack of compassion, I can’t believe that they are doing the story like this out of goodness.

Mar 21, 2014 8:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Glummulf wrote:

re: RudyHaugeneder

our technology is not that delicate. CMEs are actually quite commonplace. Most don’t hit the sun. Despite the media’s fun with it, every ten years or so we have a major event on part with the Carrington event. It’s a minor inconvenience because it interferes with radio and satellite and sometimes has shut down satellites temporarily.

Far more problematic is our software. The deaths of everyone on that crashed flight off of south america a couple of years ago was the result of a faulty airspeed sensor giving the software a severe problem. The software would not allow the pilot to correct the matter and the plane crashed.

Back in 1985, one could destroy a CMOS chip by holding it in the hand and running the foot across a carpet.

By the early 1990s, they were much more robust and able to take a much greater static charge without being damaged.

Any chip or device that can survive being a block or two from a full power radio station can survive anything we’ve seen from the sun or EMP. Which is partly why I won’t live that close to a radio station. 1/4 mile is bad enough, and is close enough to hear the station on pretty much any device with speakers.

One problem in the U.S. and it’s a major problem is how rickety some of our power systems are becoming. It’s been mostly ignored by the media how the 103rd Congress and Clinton cut almost all infrastructure spending (at least 80%) and because of that, all sorts of public works are now falling apart. Electrical interties, gas lines, water lines, sewer, highways, bridges, ports, you name it. It’s generally ignored that our major electrical systems were hardened to EMP by 1990, but that doesn’t help you much when the things are so many years past their design lifetime and/or not being maintained properly.

Here in the pacific northwest, the Pacific Intertie is in good shape, but only because it provides most of Southern California’s electricity. Built more than 40 years ago, most of the 45% of its electricity that California imports comes from the Intertie, which is fed by 11 states and Canada.

But other interties and grids across the nation are falling into disrepair. Sandy, for example, would not have done as much damage to the NE as it did, had the electrical system components not been so old and so badly maintained. When we get our usual winter windstorms in the Northwest (usually at least one storm with 100+ mph winds, and usually several with 70+ mph winds) our systems are much newer and usually only small blackouts take place.

Mar 21, 2014 8:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Glummulf wrote:

Boy, I messed that one up. “Most don’t hit the sun.” ARG. Should be “most don’t hit the earth.”

CMEs happen several times a week or month, depending upon the amount of solar activity.

spaceweather’s website gives an idea, day to day, of what happens, with links to longer-term trends

Mar 21, 2014 8:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

Isn’t the timing interesting… less than approx. 18 months after CERN’s Large Haldron Particle Collider went to full power – an event some feared could possibly create a small black hole or tear in Time/Space, an entire airliner simply vanishes for the first time in history… hmmm…..

Mar 21, 2014 9:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
hootsie wrote:

If I were a betting man, I bet that the plane is gone for good. If there was any chance of finding it, the Malaysian and other area governments should have released their radar intel right away instead of waiting for more than a week. By this time, even if debris were spotted, after two weeks of drifting, there’d be no way to tell where the plane actually went down. As for the theory that the plane was flown to some remote destination on land, I find it improbable. More than 200 hostages are just too much to manage. They’d need to eat, drink, etc. No, my money is on a crash at sea that will probably not be discovered anytime soon.

Mar 21, 2014 9:31pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
doren wrote:

50000 kids die everyday. Corruption is rampant. Injustice is rampant. What do we get? Three solid weeks of headlines “There is NO NEWS on Malaysia Airlines.” Reporters workin hard and doing swell.

Mar 21, 2014 11:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
doren wrote:

50000 kids die everyday. Corruption is rampant. Injustice is rampant. What do we get? Three solid weeks of headlines “There is NO NEWS on Malaysia Airlines.” Reporters workin hard and doing swell.

Mar 21, 2014 11:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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