Exclusive: Chinese raw materials also found on U.S. B-1 bomber, F-16 jets

Comments (12)
GCGriswold wrote:

Now isn’t this ironic! Who handled the materials purchases for these planes? Have they checked for Chinese wallboard content? Where is the QC office in Beijing?

Mar 10, 2014 7:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
GCGriswold wrote:

Now isn’t this ironic! Who handled the materials purchases for these planes? Have they checked for Chinese wallboard content? Where is the QC office in Beijing?

Mar 10, 2014 7:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jingan wrote:

clowns in DOD

Mar 10, 2014 8:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Greenspan2 wrote:

“lax controls by U.S. contractors.”
When has private industry ever encountered a regulation that they couldn’t ignore, bribe their way around, or fraudulently conceal? Patriotism is just a quaint little term designed to stir the heats of and rally “the people”. America is all about money, nothing else.

Mar 10, 2014 9:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Kahnie wrote:

Just remember: Multi-national corporations have never and will never abide by the rules of “Buy America,” or don’t “Buy China” or any other caveat. They will cheat and ignore the rules. Have been doing so since WWI. Especially did from 1933-1945 in trading with Nazi Germany when the Germans were killing Americans including the bomber mission at Polesti. Ford, GM, Standard Oil (owned Polesti), IT, and many other companies dealt with the Germans for over 12 years. (“Trading with the Enemy- 1933-1945″) Read it and weep!

Mar 10, 2014 12:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Kahnie wrote:

@Greenspan2: Absolutely spot on!

Mar 10, 2014 12:38am EDT  --  Report as abuse
carlmartel wrote:

The only surprise is that Reuters and other commenters are surprised by these facts. For 13 years the US has destroyed US computers, cell phones, and digital cameras in smart munitions. The US has destroyed US ground and air vehicles. Have any of you seen the microchips and other computer and communications components that go into modern ground and air vehicles? Look inside your own automobiles sometime and consider how much more sophisticated military equipment must be because the lives of troops depend on it.

Then, factor in the US destruction of all of its parts in wars since 9-11. Where else are they going to get all of the parts they need to fight all of the US wars in all parts of the world for 13 years? You have probably only looked at Iraq and Afghanistan, but the US fights or prepares to fight in Yemen, Somalia, Libya, Syria, most of north Africa, the Indian Ocean, the Philippines, Colombia, and the list could go on. The US also burns out chips in the extreme heat of some places where US military vehicles maneuver whether fighting occurs or not. As a result, Lenovo passed Hewlett Packard in 2011 in computer sales, and two US congressmen had a fit officially about Huawei and ZTE but truly about the Hewlett Packard assembly plants in their districts.

The point is that the US cannot blow up or burn out all of its parts for military equipment and compete against China when that country does not fight any wars. Competition and tension are not the same as bombing, invading, occupying, and fighting long term insurgencies or conducting training missions to let others fight wars to which the US does not want to commit large forces. Whether the US fights and blows up its components in its equipment or maneuvers and burns out its components, the result is that the US must buy components from other countries whether it wants to or not. This is a problem that the US made for itself, and its people are simply too stupid to understand the problem. The US must change its foreign policies and the ways in which it addresses issues instead of shooting first and asking questions later.

Mar 11, 2014 1:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
kking wrote:

All the more reason for mapping supply chains down to the raw material providers. I wonder how many manufacturers can actually look at and interact with a map of all their suppliers and the suppliers of their suppliers.

Mar 12, 2014 9:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
kking wrote:

All the more reason to map supply chains down to the raw material providers.

I wonder how many manufacturers can look at and interact with a map that shows the location of their suppliers and the suppliers of their suppliers.

Mar 12, 2014 9:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ananke wrote:

Did anybody even consider how many Chinese work at the military contractors? All of the R&D and daily operations depend on Asian citizens.

Mar 15, 2014 9:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ananke wrote:

Did anybody even consider how many Chinese work at the military contractors? All of the R&D and daily operations depend on Asian citizens.

Mar 15, 2014 9:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
My3cents wrote:

Rare earth magnets. China produces 90% of the worlds supply of rare earth metals and don’t sell much as raw material. I you want to use a compact high power magnet, then you have to buy it from the Chinese.

The US used to dominate the trade, till the mines were shutdown du to environmental protests.

Mar 16, 2014 2:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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