GM recommends light key rings after recall

Comments (15)
Jzhou wrote:

new chapter of Government Motor, if this is Honda or Toyota, pretty sure some liberal medias already asking heads of those executives… but come to Government Motor, don’t worry, they shall be fine!

Mar 12, 2014 1:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Hyperbolic wrote:

“We recommend that customers only utilize the key, key ring and key fob (if equipped) that came with the vehicle,”

I recommend GM gets off their wallet and upgrades all keyfob type ignitions to the kind that allows you to leave the fob in your pocket and start the car.

Mar 12, 2014 2:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
OnAnIsland wrote:

We repaired the problem but warn you that the problem might still exist? Add this to the inability to get repair parts (my mechanic has to order them up to three or four times before they get the right one) or even the inability to match touch up colors. GM has some big problems.

Mar 12, 2014 2:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
FreonP wrote:

Nobody will follow the recommendation because only one key on a key ring is too limiting. The government should insist that GM study the problem in more detail and provide a realistic limit on the allowable total weight of a key set in the ignition switch.

Mar 12, 2014 2:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sleeperdvr wrote:

Is it a coincidence that this wasn’t an issue when GM stood for Government Motors? Should the government also be responsible for the failures to identify this problem?

Mar 12, 2014 2:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
redmerlot wrote:

“We recommend that customers only utilize the key, key ring and key fob (if equipped) that came with the vehicle,”

I recommend that we abolish this stupid smart-key technology, and go back to simple cut metal keys that I could get made for 50 cents at any hardware store, instead of allowing the car makers to soak us for $75 (or $100, or even $200 for some of them) to make extra or replacement keys.
I recommend they stop putting complex smart ignition systems into cars that they then happily charge me a fortune for in the price of the car, when I have zero use for them, cannot choose to NOT have them, and, in fact, find them to be nothing more than an expensive nuisance.

The vast majority of people have never had their car stolen, ever, in their entire lives. Poll them. Ask them, “If you could buy this car for $500 less, would you be satisfied with a regular ignition with a simple metal key?” They won’t dare give consumers that option, because they know what the answer will be.

Thank you car makers, and thank you, insurance companies, for making everyone suffer so that people can park a Maserati on the street in Detroit and not have it stolen.

Mar 12, 2014 2:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
RichardJR wrote:

@sleeperdvr The government owned stock in the company, they did not run the company. Should all the other stockholders be held liable too?

Mar 12, 2014 3:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gcf1965 wrote:

If it is a problem with too much weight on a key ring, why is GM the only maker suffering. Are Chevy drivers in need of more key-fob weight than Ford or Hyundai drivers. Are Buick drivers carrying noticably more weight than Audi or Toyota drivers.

Mar 12, 2014 3:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jmcf81 wrote:

…..are you serious. you make automobiles. GM is actually coming out in public…in the media…and telling us their vehicles cannot handle a large key ring?? this is what we bailed out? …maybe it should have just been left to fail. you know, in my experience, if a business makes stupid decisions they tend to go out of business. GM is like a rich, spoiled child. the parents (america) give it anything it wants, pay its fines, tickets and fees, hand it a credit card, and then pay off the bill. it never learns its lesson and grows up to be useless.

Mar 12, 2014 3:42pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cubanal wrote:

I am actually not surprised. Years ago we had an ignition switch issue on a Saturn, and the first thing the service writer asked is if my wife had a really heavy key ring. I told this to my step daughter who has a key ring with every key she ever had, she is afraid to throw any of them away. Sure enough, a while later she had the same issue with a Honda and was told the same thing. Now she has a Ford with no ignition key just a fob, which is better for sure.

Mar 12, 2014 3:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SeamusDog wrote:

Nothing is more credible than 5 post of the same thing, except maybe 6.

Mar 12, 2014 4:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

Lighter key rings, that’s their solution??? Is this a joke?

As if we needed even more reasons to avoid GM…

Mar 12, 2014 4:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
FRE wrote:

Some of us have many keys. How can we avoid losing them unless we keep them together?

GM knows that some of us will have many keys on a ring. Their ignition switches should be designed with that in mind.

Mar 12, 2014 5:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlZHeimer wrote:

GM is going to lose my business. I’ve been primarily a GM buyer since my first new car in 1970 although it was a Ford Maverick. I’ve bought new a Corvette, an Oldsmobile Cutless and Aurora, a Cobalt, an Avalanche. My latest is a Lincoln MKT and boy do I love it and can’t stand the ONSTAR system that I put up with on two GM vehicles. I’ve also bought two Toyotas, a Mazda minivan, and a number of used cars. Both the Cobalt ( a 2008 not on the recall and the Avalanche) have had key problems, either stuck in the ignition or can place the key in the ignition. The Cobalt was fixed under warranty…btw, neither had heavy key chains. GM just wouldn’t stand up and be responsible when it should have…and it looks like people died. I never heard of this until the publicized recall, and I gave my 18 yo daughter the Cobalt…geez… The CEO of GM laughed at Ford’s Lincoln in an interview…maybe he needs a reality check. I liked the Lincoln so much more than the Caddy, which had always been something I wanted. Nine months later, I am more sold on the MKT. BTW, Ford, I think developed the Onstar system or its predecessor but got rid of it. Good decision although some of the features are nice but mostly unneeded when the Lincoln alternatives are considered…and free. GM might be getting better…finally…but integrity throughout the workforce is needed. It used to be the problem on the assembly line, but now it’s probably the decision makers at GM that are the problem.

Mar 12, 2014 9:08pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlZHeimer wrote:

GM is going to lose my business. I’ve been primarily a GM buyer since my first new car in 1970 although it was a Ford Maverick. I’ve bought new a Corvette, an Oldsmobile Cutless and Aurora, a Cobalt, an Avalanche. My latest is a Lincoln MKT and boy do I love it and can’t stand the ONSTAR system that I put up with on two GM vehicles. I’ve also bought two Toyotas, a Mazda minivan, and a number of used cars. Both the Cobalt ( a 2008 not on the recall and the Avalanche) have had key problems, either stuck in the ignition or can place the key in the ignition. The Cobalt was fixed under warranty…btw, neither had heavy key chains. GM just wouldn’t stand up and be responsible when it should have…and it looks like people died. I never heard of this until the publicized recall, and I gave my 18 yo daughter the Cobalt…geez… The CEO of GM laughed at Ford’s Lincoln in an interview…maybe he needs a reality check. I liked the Lincoln so much more than the Caddy, which had always been something I wanted. Nine months later, I am more sold on the MKT. BTW, Ford, I think developed the Onstar system or its predecessor but got rid of it. Good decision although some of the features are nice but mostly unneeded when the Lincoln alternatives are considered…and free. GM might be getting better…finally…but integrity throughout the workforce is needed. It used to be the problem on the assembly line, but now it’s probably the decision makers at GM that are the problem.

Mar 12, 2014 9:08pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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