Exclusive: NSA infiltrated RSA security more deeply than thought - study

Comments (34)
unionwv wrote:

Our rulers announced yesterday that Snowden’s “damage” would take ten years to overcome.

One can hope that further disclosures regarding our ruler’s activities will extend the damage indefinitely.

Liberty, as opposed to controlled dependency, requires such vigilance.

Mar 31, 2014 9:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
auger wrote:

At least Putin is getting a free chuckle.

Mar 31, 2014 9:45am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Rollo2 wrote:

It is amazing the level of deceit and corruption by our government and corporations that work with them. If our government is not controlled and International Corporations are in cahoots, we and our liberty is beyond our grasp. No one is accountable, lying, cheating and ignoring the law is common place and goes unpunished. Watch what happens to Lois Lerner, she will be held in contempt of Congress, protect Obama, and get pardoned and rewarded for her allegiance.

Mar 31, 2014 10:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Rollo2 wrote:

It is amazing the level of deceit and corruption by our government and corporations that work with them. If our government is not controlled and International Corporations are in cahoots, we and our liberty is beyond our grasp. No one is accountable, lying, cheating and ignoring the law is common place and goes unpunished. Watch what happens to Lois Lerner, she will be held in contempt of Congress, protect Obama, and get pardoned and rewarded for her allegiance.

Mar 31, 2014 10:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Rollo2 wrote:

It is amazing the level of deceit and corruption by our government and corporations that work with them. If our government is not controlled and International Corporations are in cahoots, we and our liberty is beyond our grasp. No one is accountable, lying, cheating and ignoring the law is common place and goes unpunished. Watch what happens to Lois Lerner, she will be held in contempt of Congress, protect Obama, and get pardoned and rewarded for her allegiance.

Mar 31, 2014 10:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Rollo2 wrote:

It is amazing the level of deceit and corruption by our government and corporations that work with them. If our government is not controlled and International Corporations are in cahoots, we and our liberty is beyond our grasp. No one is accountable, lying, cheating and ignoring the law is common place and goes unpunished. Watch what happens to Lois Lerner, she will be held in contempt of Congress, protect Obama, and get pardoned and rewarded for her allegiance.

Mar 31, 2014 10:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
desertares wrote:

Lost in the slavish admiration of Snowden’s cowardly acts, are the fact that he took refuge in a country which is systematically destroying any dissenting political activities, invading it’s neighbors and becoming a massive force for world uneasiness. His release of information the US used to spy on its increasing foreign aggressive opponents (industrial spying, broken diplomatic codes, the use of skpe to follow terrorists, certainly aid and abet two countries and Islamist gangs that are not not and never will be allies or even neutral bystanders to the
USA. Think perhaps the best punishment for hi is exile in Russia, China, Pakistan or Afghanistan.

Mar 31, 2014 11:29am EDT  --  Report as abuse
majkmushrm wrote:

It’s good to know that both political parties are equal opportunity violators of the Constitution and the public’s trust in the government. While all of this started during Shrub’s regime, the Obama regime did nothing to reverse it. At the end of the day, if you ask yourself, “should I trust my government?”, you would be unwise to answer in the affirmative.

Mar 31, 2014 11:31am EDT  --  Report as abuse
SeaWa wrote:

Snowden is a traitor. The way he chose to disclose NSA spying was wrong. However, to Congress I say: Be good patriots by abolishing the patriot act that created this mess to begin with.

Mar 31, 2014 11:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
SeaWa wrote:

@Rollo2 – I fear you are correct. Unfortunately all governments are corrupt or corruptable by the global private sector. However here in the US we have more influence over government than does almost any other country. That is worth preserving.

Mar 31, 2014 11:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
brotherkenny4 wrote:

desertares: We are the land of secret police and spying on ones neighbors now. Soviet internal spy networks and the lack of justice is exactly what demotivated their people and allowed immense corruption which is what led to their downfall. We are now doing exactly that here. It seems you believe that the old soviet style of governance is what we should have too. How very seditious of you. Remember, we have a constitution and a bill of rights.

Mar 31, 2014 12:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ECCexpert wrote:

What is really peculiar is that the industry only concentrates on RSA when discussing ECC. In 2003 Certicom, a RIM company (who owns the most patents when it comes to ECC) did a huge, bigger than 20 million USD deal with NSA selling all the rights to use certain strength ECC.
Could this mean that the whole ECC theory has been “hacked”.

MISSISSAUGA, Ontario – (October 24, 2003) – Certicom Corp. (TSX: CIC), a leading provider of wireless security solutions, today announced that the National Security Agency (NSA) in Maryland has purchased extensive licensing rights to Certicom’s MQV-based Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) intellectual property. ECC is becoming a crucial technology for protecting national security information.

Mar 31, 2014 1:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wrobin13 wrote:

“We could have been more skeptical of NSA’s intentions”…REALLY maybe the $10 million dollars that was received from the NSA by RSA skewed thier skepticism. Just Sayin!!!

Mar 31, 2014 1:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Butch_from_PA wrote:

What is really happening here is the new cold war. The elite and powerful with grips into government vs the working class.

The digital age makes it so much easier to spy on the mood of the population and dissect out powerful dissidents. We, the USA, took many tools and techniques used in China to manage our own citizens – on behalf of those in power.

It’s a family affair. If you are not part of the family – be very careful what you say in the digital medium – encrypted or not – they are watching and will cull you out as simple as their version of picking weeds. This is one of the most important times in history for citizens to take action at the ground roots – to protect the freedom of the next generations.

Mar 31, 2014 1:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
kakilicli wrote:

“We could have been more skeptical of NSA’s intentions,” RSA Chief Technologist Sam Curry told Reuters. “We trusted them because they are charged with security for the U.S. government and U.S. critical infrastructure.”..Well, somehow, I bet the $10 million the NSA gave them helped reduce the skepticism…..

Mar 31, 2014 2:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
kakilicli wrote:

@wrobin13 guess we’re on the same page here

Mar 31, 2014 2:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
paintcan wrote:

The machines and geeks can waste all the time they like and program trading can make stock traders obsolete and we will all have out “liberty” to do nothing much at all.

I just saw an old copy of “Casino Royale” with Daniel Craig. M not only got her monk – she got a castrato to boot. Snowden and Putin still have their balls while a lot of the people in the Cyber Security business can’t quite recall what theirs ever looked like.

Mar 31, 2014 2:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

“The company said it had not intentionally weakened security on any product”

To date, not one company has admitted to purposely inserting back doors for the NSA. The fact is there are backdoors, and we have NSA documents backing up their existance. They obviously don’t want to break the non-disclosure agreements. Just goes to show that even when caught in the act, the first reaction is to deny that anything happened, which is part of how they were so good with hiding their actions for so long.

Mar 31, 2014 2:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Oma wrote:

Some facts to remember about Snowden:

He applied for asylum to ten or more countries and was turned away because they were afraid of American sanctions. The only two who were not afraid were Hong Kong and Russia. Hong Kong refused to extradite Snowden because of spelling errors in some documents, which was only temporary, so Snowden moved on to Russia, where he got stuck in an airport because the United States had revoked his passport. In a word, Snowden is in Russia because of circumstances beyond his control, not for political reasons. (I am grateful to President Putin. I also like that he rides a Harley Davidson motorcycle — Putin, not Snowden.)

The whistle blower laws that lay out proper channels for whistle blowers specifically exclude employees of contractors, which is what Snowden was. There were no proper channels for Snowden.

Mar 31, 2014 3:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

Thanks to NSA we have a backdoor in every device on the internet. Now the secret is lost and all blame is put on the “defector.” Who should held accountable installing these backdoors? It runs against every security practice on this planet.

Mar 31, 2014 3:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
CDN_Rebel wrote:

And in other news: spies spy on people! WHAT?!? Unbelievable! Not in Murica dey don’t, only in fur-in countries dey does dis…

Granted all this spying hasn’t done much in the war on terror (something most people would call a crock anyway) it has manage to discombobulate three of the four biggest Mexican drug cartels. Can’t end prohibition when the gangsters still have power – I’d say MJ being legal federally is coming soon once Sinaloa is broken too.

Mar 31, 2014 3:58pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mdrdl wrote:

Yet more proof the NSA betrayed America and weakened the US infrastructure.

Mar 31, 2014 5:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SaveRMiddle wrote:

Reuters…..Thank you for this journalism.

Mar 31, 2014 5:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

“We trusted them because they are charged with security for the U.S. government and U.S. critical infrastructure.”
========
Oh puhleeezzzeee!!! You let a bunch of KNOWN SPIES, *PAY YOU* to incorporate their “product” into yours. What the H could you have possibly been thinking? Such a LAME excuse is something that is hard to swallow…

Mar 31, 2014 6:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

“Lost in the slavish admiration of Snowden’s cowardly acts, are the fact that he took refuge in a country which is systematically destroying any dissenting political activities, invading it’s neighbors…”
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Nope… not lost on me at all. I think it’s OUTRAGEOUS that someone simply seeking to uphold our Constitutional values had to go to Russia for protection… THAT is a SHAMEFUL display by our country…

Mar 31, 2014 6:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Vandedecken wrote:

Best part is other USA Government Agencies might have used this and had their data stolen constantly. A Government that is its own worst enemy, too funny.

Mar 31, 2014 8:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fafsbo wrote:

NSA Scum.

Mar 31, 2014 8:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
redboy wrote:

All this begs the question why did the powers that be give us the internet in the first place? Ostensibly created by a government agency DARPA, it morphed into a virtual playground for mere mortals, with free access to all kinds of tantalizing and forbidden knowledge, then it transformed again into the commercial wasteland it has become today, all the while we have been thoroughly mesmerized and become addicted to this “thing” called “online”. The human race has lost its battle I fear, we are and will continue to be monitored by our commercial and governmental task masters, lured into clicking one more hyperlink, divulging one more bit of personal information, until we no longer have any privacy, or personal freedoms.
Snowden revealed but the tip of the iceberg.

Mar 31, 2014 9:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

“Snowden is a traitor. The way he chose to disclose NSA spying was wrong.”
=========
IMHO… only a fool would think he had any other *viable* option…

Mar 31, 2014 12:13am EDT  --  Report as abuse
snowyphile wrote:

Citizens need to be the government, as in Switzerland.

Apr 01, 2014 8:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Oma wrote:

@ mb56

Snowden is in Russia because of circumstances beyond his control, not for any political reason. He applied for asylum to ten or more countries and was turned away because they were afraid of American sanctions. The only two who were not afraid were Hong Kong and Russia. Hong Kong refused to extradite Snowden because of spelling errors in some documents, which was only temporary, so Snowden moved on to Russia, where he got stuck in an airport because the United States had revoked his passport.

We have whistle blower laws that tell us how to report problems, but they specifically exclude contractor’s employees, which is what Snowden was. Some say he should have reported what he knew to his Congressman, but Congress is the body that made the laws authorizing the NSA: it would have been reporting a theft to the burglar.

Only the American public could stop the NSA abuses, no one else. His choice was to simply publish documents on the internet or turn them over to the media, whose function is, after all, to inform the public. So he chose two well known, responsible newspapers, one in the United States and one in England.

NSA abuses were undermining the freedom we purport to stand for. Without Mr. Snowden or someone like him it would go on and on, unabated. He has sacrificed a good lifestyle — Hawaii, $200,000K/year and a beautiful girlfriend — and put his freedom and even his life at risk to give us information we need to defend our freedom. He is a hero.

Apr 01, 2014 10:27am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Oma wrote:

@ snowyphile

I like to think about Switzerland. It is a beautiful, beautiful country; in World War II it was surrounded by axis powers and still stayed neutral; it has a tradition of maintaining enough military to defend itself and no more (who ever heard of a Swiss conlony?); and its focus is on having a good life for its citizens. Come to think of it, I have never read any report of a Swiss company being environmentally destructive.

Apr 01, 2014 10:44am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Oma wrote:

Reuters . . . we could have better conversations if comments were posted in a more timely manner. I have one in this section that took more than twelve hours.

Apr 01, 2014 10:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Overcast451 wrote:

*“Snowden is a traitor. The way he chose to disclose NSA spying was wrong.”
=========
IMHO… only a fool would think he had any other *viable* option…*

Correct. The NSA and those that walk on our constitutional rights are the traitors.

Snowden only exposed outrageous violations of law. And when the law is being violated as such – it could quickly bring the legitimacy of the ‘top secret’ classification into question as it’s being used to cover criminal activities.

According to Title 18, he has the OBLIGATION to expose the felonious activity. Violating the civil rights of the people – would be a felony.

“Title 18 U.S.C. § 4. Misprision of felony. Whoever, having knowledge of the actual commission of a felony cognizable by a court of the United States, conceals and does not as soon as possible make known the same to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.”

And since there was no ‘trust’ involved – as the felonies were being committed by the ‘authorities’ – he had no other option, really – so he had to provide the information to the real ‘chief’ and ‘ruler’ of the land: “The citizens of the United States”.

After all; “We the people” are in fact the highest ‘power’ in the nation, by design – or well, that’s how it was designed to work.

“Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.”

So I guess it depends on how you look at it. If you see the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution as the ‘law of the land’ – then clearly our politicians are in violation of many of the laws and concepts in those documents.

But if you prefer the morass of new laws that are used to control us, then sure – consider him a traitor.

Apr 02, 2014 10:06am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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