Exclusive: U.S. states probing security breach at Experian unit

Comments (7)
Simplerman wrote:

I’m sure all the Experian data is routed through a few data sweat shops in India for processing. What could go wrong?

Apr 03, 2014 3:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
diluded0000 wrote:

So what is the crime here? The fact that Ngo accessed the information, or the fact that he did it outside the US? Isn’t this data is already for sale from US Info search, et al?

Apr 03, 2014 3:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wilhelm wrote:

big brother didn’t get paid, so somebody must go to jail.

Apr 03, 2014 4:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AZWarrior wrote:

In the broader contex, identity theft currently leaves the victim to pick up the tab for their stolen identity. Some never clear their names and are sentenced to a bad credit life sentence. That has to change. First, the victim should have a one-step notification procedure that turns off all the associated credit and other financial transactions and causes an immediate no-fault replacement of all financial instruments (cards, accounts, etc) and an automatic replacement SSAN with all earnings data scrubbed of falsified information. Stop making the victim an victim again. Secondly, the crime of identity theft should be elevated to a higher felony and investigated with a goal of arresting the culprits. Lastly, serious jail time without parole should be handed down and plea deals discouraged. Time to get serious about this growing criminal enterprise.

Apr 03, 2014 8:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AZWarrior wrote:

In the broader contex, identity theft currently leaves the victim to pick up the tab for their stolen identity. Some never clear their names and are sentenced to a bad credit life sentence. That has to change. First, the victim should have a one-step notification procedure that turns off all the associated credit and other financial transactions and causes an immediate no-fault replacement of all financial instruments (cards, accounts, etc) and an automatic replacement SSAN with all earnings data scrubbed of falsified information. Stop making the victim an victim again. Secondly, the crime of identity theft should be elevated to a higher felony and investigated with a goal of arresting the culprits. Lastly, serious jail time without parole should be handed down and plea deals discouraged. Time to get serious about this growing criminal enterprise.

Apr 03, 2014 8:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

How many US citizens in the USA? Isn’t it around 300 million? And this subsidiary of Experian lost 200 million social security numbers with related info? Two thirds of the entire countries personal info that can now be used for identity theft…lost by a corporation that is a government sanctioned credit agency? Class action law suit against Experian; shut them down, change the law to make it illegal for a credit check corporation to sell your information. This is what has become of American capitalism; the crooks bribe the political class to be allowed to game the system.

Apr 04, 2014 3:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
OhThatDave wrote:

We need to change a lot of innocent “white collar” crimes to have more meaningful impact in punishment. Identity Theft should be put in the same felony class as Kidnapping or Extortion, and companies that are unwitting accomplices due to neglect should face similar “Accessory to.. ” type charges.

With the anticipated data breaches inherent in the data corrupt Affordable Healthcare websites, responsible government officials should face similar punishment, up to, and including a lifetime ban from government service and suspension of any post employment benefits.

Apr 06, 2014 9:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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