Oklahoma botches execution, raising questions on death penalty in U.S.

Comments (51)
ChrisHerz wrote:

In the USA the death penalty for murderers is a sacred ritual. The worst killers, however are sent to the White House and the Congress.

Apr 29, 2014 9:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
DavidinWY wrote:

Why don’t we introduce a “Hunger Games” style capital punishment procedure? All we are doing to this point has been way too boring, and ratings are down. If death row inmates were able to finish the race courses without dying, and advertisers could sponsor participants or show product logos, then the inmates might receive prizes, or points to have their sentence commuted to life, without possibility of parole. Still entertaining, and let’s face it, simple executions are just boring.

Apr 29, 2014 9:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
elsewhere wrote:

There is a reason a vein blows out and it isn’t something the state caused.

Apr 29, 2014 10:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AngelaF wrote:

“Lockett, 38, was convicted of first-degree murder, rape, kidnapping and robbery for a 1999 crime spree with two co-defendants. He was found to have shot teen-ager Stephanie Nieman and buried her alive in a shallow grave where she eventually died.”

No matter what he went through when he died it does not compare to what he put this teenage girl through.

Apr 29, 2014 11:10pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
rottie123 wrote:

I don’t suppose he was merciful when he buried that girl alive

Apr 29, 2014 11:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
anotherview wrote:

What part of this equation do the anti-death-penalty fanatics not understand: “Oklahoma uses three drugs in its new lethal injection mixture, which consists of midazolam to cause unconsciousness, vecuronium bromide to stop respiration and potassium chloride to stop the heart.” In other words, the condemned one may have physically moved after losing consciousness due to a natural reaction the body may exhibit from dying. Yet while unconscious the condemned one would have no conscious awareness of his reaction or of any pain. The lawyers merely speculate the dying individual feels pain. They cannot know for a fact he feels pain. Mere physical movement may not translate to the experience of pain for the individual if unconscious.

And the execution was not “botched.” The condemned one died as intended.

Apr 29, 2014 11:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jwillx wrote:

Why are they using stupid chemicals to kill people
deserving death?

The simplest, fastest, and most merciful way to execute
someone would be to tie them down, as with a guillotine;
BUT, instead of dropping a blade, dropping a ~10-ton steel
block which instantly and painlessly squashes their skull.

Apr 29, 2014 11:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jwillx wrote:

Why are they using stupid chemicals to kill people
deserving death?

The simplest, fastest, and most merciful way to execute
someone would be to tie them down, as with a guillotine;
BUT, instead of dropping a blade, dropping a ~10-ton steel
block which instantly and painlessly squashes their skull.

Apr 29, 2014 11:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
HemiHead66 wrote:

“Warner, 46, was convicted for the 1997 first-degree rape and murder of 11-month-old Adrianna Waller, who was the daughter of his then-girlfriend, Shonda Waller.”

And they’re worried about cruel and unusual punishment???? They should put this freak to death with battery acid.

Apr 29, 2014 11:54pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ralphooo wrote:

The “bucking” of the prisoner was likely a sign of partial paralysis in conjunction with tremendous pain. “Bucking” is the term used in the operating room for people’s body movements if they experience unintended consciousness during surgery. There is a substantial literature on the problem of patients going through an entire surgery while paralyzed yet not unconscious. It is a horrific experience which affects these unfortunate people for the rest of their lives.

But botched executions are only one reason to reconsider our laws on this subject. Regardless of the method, killing people as revenge for the crimes they have committed is barbaric and will eventually be halted here, as it has been throughout most of the world. Then we will look back in sorrow at these killings, known euphemistically as “executions.” They are no different from “an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth” — hardly an appropriate system of justice for a civilized country.

Of course there is no need to repeat this once again. We all know what the death penalty does and what it means. And, regardless of what we may say in connection with supporting a political party, virtually all of us know that the death penalty is obsolete. We know it has no place in a 21st-century system of justice.

Apr 29, 2014 12:06am EDT  --  Report as abuse
AtypicalMale wrote:

Ralphooo, you voice the opinion… “killing people as revenge for the crimes they have committed is barbaric”. You’re entitled to your opinion.

However, I, and many others like me, instead possess a differing point of view in regards to two aspects of your statement. First, it’s deserved punishment, not ‘revenge’. Secondly, regarding the definition of the word ‘barbaric’ in conjunction with this filth who was successfully punished for his crimes, the following paragraph from the story notes our point of view for that word’s definition:

“Lockett, 38, was convicted of first-degree murder, rape, kidnapping and robbery for a 1999 crime spree with two co-defendants. He was found to have shot teen-ager Stephanie Nieman and buried her alive in a shallow grave where she eventually died.”

In learning that about this individual and this case, my only regret is that it took 15 years for him to finally receive a fitting punishment for those crimes.

“We all know what the death penalty does and what it means”, you say. Contrary to the statement you’re attempting to make, not everyone feels sadness as you apparently do over the removal of excrement such as this from our world. Repeating the thought from the paragraph above: he kidnapped, robbed, raped, and murdered during his stint of crime, burying alive a young woman whom he had shot and leaving her to suffer a slow death. THAT is suffering. THAT is ‘cruel and unusual punishment’.

Yes, I know what the death penalty does… it provides for a fitting outcome, albeit a decade and a half too late, for this trash who got what he long-ago deserved.

Apr 30, 2014 3:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
redboy wrote:

cruel and unusual? rape murder not cruel and unusual? they should televise these as a deterrent.

Apr 30, 2014 5:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse

I bet that 19 year old girl that he shot and buried alive choked and thrashed also.

Apr 30, 2014 8:03am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Robert76 wrote:

For those who wish to end the Death Penalty, what would you suggest as a replacement? While it is rare, we have had people convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison subsequently escape and commit more murders.

If we are to lock them up for life, it needs to be somewhere so isolated that escape is impossible, and survival outside the prison is impossible. Then we also need to not reward them with air conditioning, color TV, 3 full meals a day, etc.

The few that have been on death row, and later proven to be not guilty does however give pause to make absolutely sure the person is guilty. Then the sentence needs to be quickly carried out without all the frivolous appeals that drag the punishment out. That way the criminal can more quickly great his ultimate judge.

Apr 30, 2014 8:44am EDT  --  Report as abuse
1996MEdition wrote:

I’m glad that Reuters chose to include the following:
“Lockett, 38, was convicted of first-degree murder, rape, kidnapping and robbery for a 1999 crime spree with two co-defendants. He was found to have shot teen-ager Stephanie Nieman and buried her alive in a shallow grave where she eventually died.

Warner, 46, was convicted for the 1997 first-degree rape and murder of 11-month-old Adrianna Waller, who was the daughter of his then-girlfriend, Shonda Waller.”

Permanent removal from this earth is the only fitting punishment for these two. Their victims did not die in a humane way. I have no sympathy for these guys and have no problem with their fate.

Apr 30, 2014 8:48am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ditto1333 wrote:

In this article attorney Dieter comments “This might lead to a halt in executions until states can prove they can do it without problems. Someone was killed tonight by incompetence,”
I can’t even process that information when you think about the actions of these criminals that put them in this situation. Once it is determined that the death penalty is appropriate, let’s focus on the victims not the suffering of the murderer who should have the same rights they offered their victims.

Apr 30, 2014 8:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Fergy57 wrote:

He was found to have shot teen-ager Stephanie Nieman and buried her alive in a shallow grave where she eventually died.

Tell me again WHY WE ARE CONCERNED that this guy suffered when being executed? Maybe it was KARMA and didn’t have anything to do with the drugs uses?

Apr 30, 2014 8:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Zeken wrote:

He died. Mission accomplished. NEXT!

Apr 30, 2014 9:01am EDT  --  Report as abuse
anotherview wrote:

Beg to differ. The drug propofol renders the individual fully unconscious. A large dose of propofol induces profound unconsciousness. A lethal dose of propofol brings death. In addition, the drug propofol erases memory of any events the individual may have consciously experienced during a procedure.

The anti-death-penalty fanatics, defense attorneys, and ignorant or biased news media workers ignore the efficacy of propofol in carrying out a due execution of the condemned one.

A complete justice system requires the death penalty for the worst crimes. On the other side, the opposition to the death penalty always rests on a moral argument. This argument fails to persuade a rational mind, however, in the face of the awful crimes that invoke the death penalty. The death penalty fulfills justice.

Apr 30, 2014 9:05am EDT  --  Report as abuse
zigo wrote:

Now the pro-lifers come out in droves asking that the DEATH penalty gets eliminated.

Apr 30, 2014 9:32am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sego wrote:

The simple solution is to stop killing people.

Apr 30, 2014 9:50am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Doc62 wrote:

How can one feel sorry about the elimination of this POS? I’m sure his victims had more pain than he. Being that we have plenty of bullets in the USA, let’s go with shooting executions. Cheaper and easier. Worried about the psychological effects on the shooters? Let’s use the jailed murderous gangbangers to do the shooting. Concerned about prison safety? Give each one bullet and if they balk, the guards can shoot them dead, makes more room in stir.
A win-win-win situation.

Apr 30, 2014 10:20am EDT  --  Report as abuse
GSColorado wrote:

Why do we kill people who kill people to show that killing people is wrong?

Apr 30, 2014 10:20am EDT  --  Report as abuse
NCMAN64 wrote:

I only hope that criminal felt some of the terror and pain that his victim(s)felt, before he died. Leave it to the liberals to complain about a “botched” execution, when it’s all about the victims and their families that count. Liberals would rather murder innocent fetus’s than give criminal killers justice that matches the crime.

Apr 30, 2014 10:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
diluded0000 wrote:

Big2Tex, if you are going to spout racist vitriol, you should change your screen name. My daughter is Texan, and your comments disgrace the state and my family.

Do I care about child killers suffering? Nope, not a bit. But I don’t want to pay to support a government that lowers itself the level of a brutal murderer, which is exactly what happened.

To those of you who scoff at the appeals process: you better hope you don’t get what you want, then get falsely accused of murder. Do you really trust the government so much?

Apr 30, 2014 11:25am EDT  --  Report as abuse
hawkeye19 wrote:

Go back to firing squads. Cheaper and guaranteed results.

Apr 30, 2014 11:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
hawkeye19 wrote:

He raped a baby? The baby’s parents should have been allowed to use a shotgun to blow his head off.

Apr 30, 2014 11:50am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Randy549 wrote:

Bring back the electric chair. Yes, there were isolated botched executions with that also, but the problems that caused those are *much* easier to fix than the problem of not being able to obtain suitable drugs for lethal injection.

Properly conducted, electrocution in the chair is quick and painless. Forget what you may have seen in fiction like “The Green Mile;” that was Stephen King’s nightmare mind at work for a piece of fiction.

Apr 30, 2014 11:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jr. wrote:

How much sympathy are we supposed to feel for this man?

Apr 30, 2014 12:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

We’re over-thinking it. New humane execution cocktails? Because a lawyer said so?

You got a guy who rapes and kills kids for fun…. just shoot him or hang him. An execution is about disposal of an extremely dangerous person (and maybe a little revenge, which is fair after all). It’s not intended to be a medical procedure.

Apr 30, 2014 12:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
QuidProQuo wrote:

Gosh, why does this issue have to be more complicated than it is? Heroin is a cheap street drug and can easily be administered in a lethal overdose level. Easy enough.

Apr 30, 2014 12:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
YoungTurkArmy wrote:

A study was just released showing that homophobes die an average of 2.5 years earlier than those who don’t hate the gays. Assuming this is from internalizing their negative attitudes, you might just want to consider how your opinions towards others–as loathsome as those people might be–may well impact your future.

Apr 30, 2014 1:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
oldexperience wrote:

Clayton was a horrible killer and he deserved to die. If his means of dying caused him pain it was his own fault. If he had not murdered he would not be in prison and he would not be on death row and he would not be given an injection. It was all his fault and he deserves no kindness as if he were an outstanding citizen, or someone that has saved lives or other commendable behavior. People have got to understand that this was a horrible man and he does not deserve anyone’s kindness. Other than the lawyers looking at him and this issue as a meal ticket, I can find no other person that wants to hear about this evil in our society.

Apr 30, 2014 1:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Stager wrote:

The French got it right.
Guillotine.
Quick, painless, fail-safe.

And definitely sends a message.

Apr 30, 2014 1:31pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jr88 wrote:

‘TORTURED TO DEATH’ – seriously – isn’t this the same person who shot a young girl with a shotgun, then buried her alive….tortured to death – eye for an eye…looks like he got what was coming to him..

Apr 30, 2014 2:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Dumbstruck wrote:

I am glad he suffered! However, he did not suffer long enough!

Apr 30, 2014 2:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
JRTerrance wrote:

The execution wasn’t “botched”. He’s dead, isn’t he?

Apr 30, 2014 2:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
IamBAD1 wrote:

The state has to abide by the 8th Amendment of the US Bill of Rights; criminals don’t have to abide by the 8th Amendment–that what make criminals criminals. State sanctioned murder at least has to abide by the 8th Amendment.

Apr 30, 2014 2:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
PapaDisco wrote:

Maybe he should have been shot and buried alive instead.

Apr 30, 2014 3:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jbeech wrote:

No crocodile tears from me because of the botched’ procedure. In fact, if it were up to me I would suggested they use a rope instead. Why? Simply because it’s quick, more certain, and less costly.

Apr 30, 2014 3:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
kholi wrote:

“Lockett, 38, was convicted of first-degree murder, rape, kidnapping and robbery for a 1999 crime spree with two co-defendants. He was found to have shot teen-ager Stephanie Nieman and buried her alive in a shallow grave where she eventually died.” My only question to all who are calling this a travesty….how long do you suppose it took Stephanie to die?

Apr 30, 2014 3:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
DavidinWY wrote:

How many rich people have been put to death? Is that because they don’t commit murders?

Apr 30, 2014 4:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Capital punishment violates the New Testament. Nothing Jesus teaches, mentions execution and he specifically warned against retribution and revenge.

That said, I am glad I am not a Christian. I am too much in favor of the death penalty.

Apr 30, 2014 4:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
chuck2 wrote:

The biggest “botch” with legalized murder by the state is when you see all the people latter proven innocent, more so the ones the state had not got to executing and those on death row or life sentences. Since USA has some of more corrupted state/local courts in world, justice often based on how much money one has, or worse yet does not have, way past time to do away with this somewhat bias toward poor “retributions”, but it often is tool to gain votes for “law and Order”, when the pols do bottom troll for votes. So comes down to how many innocent must we kill, to make it OK to kill “the guilty”, A subject none discuss as the victims there are now silent, and states like TX destroy all the evidence etc once they execute/ Yep even retarded get “their rewards”. Kind of like another Icon of USA “going Rome” as we fail, just toss them to the lions for the spectators, so to speak. Ah yes, as very old Lime lighters song goes on criminals, “even if we make a mistake some time”?

Apr 30, 2014 4:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
BBPDTX wrote:

Add the full story Reuters.

“Lockett, 38, was convicted of the killing of 19-year-old, Stephanie Neiman, in 1999. She was shot and buried alive. Lockett was also convicted of raping her friend in the violent home invasion that lead to Neiman’s death.”

Apr 30, 2014 4:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Yashmak wrote:

“Lockett, 38, was convicted of first-degree murder, rape, kidnapping and robbery for a 1999 crime spree with two co-defendants. He was found to have shot teen-ager Stephanie Nieman and buried her alive in a shallow grave where she eventually died.”

“Undue suffering” is what Lockett’s victim went through.

Apr 30, 2014 4:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Larrym14169 wrote:

I could care less how much this evil POS suffered and it was not even my daughter that he shot and watched get buried alive. I am all for the death penalty. Most of the whiney people against it (mostly Liberals) would be singing a different tune had it been their loved one that died this way

Apr 30, 2014 5:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sammwise wrote:

The State gave this murder more consideration than he gave the family he raped and killed.
Good riddance, guess he won’t re-offend.

Apr 30, 2014 7:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SmartThinking wrote:

A rope and a tree used to suffice.

Apr 30, 2014 7:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Dumbstruck wrote:

He deserved every second of it!

May 01, 2014 10:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
jimstull wrote:

When one considers what the executed has done it is misplaced sympathy if a person would find the death penalty unjust. The fastest way to execute someone seems to be the firing squad and we probably should go to it.
I do not find any sympathy for the guy in Oklahoma, but the firing squad would be very fast, certain and it is simple – you only need four bullets, not be concerned about the quantity of drugs, if they are administered correctly, etc. By executing people in such a medicinal way it takes away from what is really being done. It often is done with almost no pain – the condemned shouldn’t get off so easily. I think a really humane execution would be an oxygen deprivation chamber – put the guy in there, remove the oxygen quickly and it should be very easy.
Lets also remember that the people who are executed die with less suffering than almost all of us. That is not the way it should be.

May 04, 2014 2:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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