After bombing in west, China angered by U.S. criticism in terror report

Comments (14)
mefree wrote:

U.S. should mind its own house instead of minding others own internal affairs.Should China start wars throughout the world as the U.S. does? The superpowers are quickly failing(U.S. and Russia)leaving a void of leadership in the world that will lead to only 2 possible outcomes.Either leadership from Asia or war throughout most of the continents of the planet.

May 01, 2014 12:13am EDT  --  Report as abuse
isthnu wrote:

The State department is finally starting to get it right: there should be no double standards in fighting terrorism. Some foreign media too, shouldn’t be hoodwinked by the bad guys in exile who salivate for the media to don the same vest with them; it’s the Chinese public, passengers, etc., who are butchered indiscriminately, a fact as clear and severe, if not more so, as that happening in other parts of the world.

May 02, 2014 1:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
aunticcp wrote:

The only relations that the rest of the World should be having with the cruel CCP is trying to bring to trial the thousands of Communist Party members who have been and are still committing millions of human rights atrocities.The brutal Chinese Communist Party has murdered over fifty million of its own people since 1949, since 1999 it has been attempting the blood-thirsty genocide of the tens of millions of innocent Falun Gong who live in Mainland China. To this end, the heinous CCP is using torture,slavery, organ harvesting and murder. Because of corporate greed, these atrocities and millions of others have been kept from the Western people by the Western media. The weak United Nations even appointed the brutal CCP a seat on its Human Rights Council this year. Shameful. Thank you for your concern.

May 02, 2014 10:09am EDT  --  Report as abuse
delta5297 wrote:

Oh no…China is angry because they treat their people like crap and created their own terrorism problem, and now they want to avoid taking the blame for it.

May 02, 2014 11:58am EDT  --  Report as abuse
CountryPride wrote:

You know wherever Mohammadans are involved Obama rushes in to their defense!

May 02, 2014 12:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

It is true, China wants a big chunk of the world’s resources from places like Nigeria and Sudan and Islamic Eurasia, but relies on grown-up countries’ tax dollars to do the policing there.

China needs to pay if they want to play. They are always hungry at the table, but never helping much in the kitchen.

May 02, 2014 12:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
StigTW wrote:

The attack at the train station was sick & vile. If the US govt or a misguided official is in any way whitewashing that event shame shame shame!

May 02, 2014 1:09pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

The US says China provided scarce evidence to prove terrorist involvement? The US doesn’t have a lot of room to talk!

May 02, 2014 1:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
blanddragon wrote:

Ah yes China, land of free thinkers and a beacon of open communication. The only terrorists in China are in their government. China you should seek counseling for you anger management problem.

May 02, 2014 1:43pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
eecrits wrote:

(1) Your view appears to me somewhat superficial
(2) The question to be asked is this: when China under Mao was much more brutal and dictatorial than today, why was militant terrorism not so big a problem?
(3) The biggest enemy of all dictatorial regimes is its own people. In China’s case, it was the Han Chinese. For decades, the Chinese government gave preferential treatments to minorities such as the Uighurs(the Uighurs are allowed to carry machetes in public; not subject to the one-child policy; if a Han and a Uighur are involved in a fight, the Han will be punished severely whereas nothing will happen to the Uighur, to name a few) and tried to win their “support” to trump up its domestic legitimacy. Due to the policy, the Uighurs have developed a deep disdain for the Han Chinese and regard them as racially inferior and culturally slavish
(3) Everything started to change when China came out of Mao’s grip and began to liberalize. Suddenly, the Han became rich and prosperous. Many of them moved to new places all over the world, including XinJiang, and made money there. With the Uighurs left behind, who tried to hold on to their old ways and status, the Han returned the favor by disdaining them back.
(4) in other words, today’s terrorism is more against the Han people than against the so-called “one party rule,” or even the Chinese government directly (the uighurs are not Westerners, after all). They want to kill all Hans and drive them out of XinJiang. If the government does not do it, they will do it on their own. Their drive for independence is also motivated by the same ethnic pathos.
(5) Some scholars inside China, without any irony or cynicism, advocate for the “equal” treatment of the Uighurs, which means (1) to treat them like Han (2) i.e., to treat them worse. The idea is systematic cultural assimilation. The current Chinese policy (still the same as in the past) gave incentives for Uighurs not to marry with the Chinese or become the Chinese (so as not to lose their ethnic status). By revoking all the privileges accrued thereunto, they will find incentives to intermarry with the Han, live like the Han, and think like the Han. Whatever the merit of this proposal, it reflects part of the historical background for the current ethnic conflicts.
(6) In other words, the Chinese government has incentive now to “strike hard” and “fight the separatist movement,” – it is a way to deflect the blame and muddy the waters. It is the Chinese government’s soviet style ethnic favoritism that has created the deep chasm between different race groups. To speak about the Uighurs’ yearning for independence and democratic self-rule can play into the hands of the Chinese government. They want the Han to think in the same way and therefore stand behind the government in the fight against separatism and “international” terrorism, rather than point the fingers at the government itself.

May 02, 2014 5:08pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Maria_L_Yau wrote:

I’m glad to read that U.S. has U.S. criticism towards China’s authorities labelled several incidents of violence involving members of the the Uighur minority as acts of terrorism.
In general and often Chinese authorities don’t provide detailed evidence of terrorist involvement and and restricted the ability of journalists and international observers to independently verify official media accounts. This makes Chinese news unreliable.
And it’s also well known that China’s state use Uighurs as scape goat on every incidents in East Turkestan!

May 03, 2014 8:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Maria_L_Yau wrote:

I’m glad to read that U.S. has U.S. criticism towards China’s authorities labelled several incidents of violence involving members of the the Uighur minority as acts of terrorism.
In general and often Chinese authorities don’t provide detailed evidence of terrorist involvement and and restricted the ability of journalists and international observers to independently verify official media accounts. This makes Chinese news unreliable.
And it’s also well known that China’s state use Uighurs as scape goat on every incidents in East Turkestan!

May 03, 2014 8:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Maria_L_Yau wrote:

I’m glad to read that U.S. has U.S. criticism towards China’s authorities labelled several incidents of violence involving members of the the Uighur minority as acts of terrorism.
In general and often Chinese authorities don’t provide detailed evidence of terrorist involvement and and restricted the ability of journalists and international observers to independently verify official media accounts. This makes Chinese news unreliable.
And it’s also well known that China’s state use Uighurs as scape goat on every incidents in East Turkestan!

May 03, 2014 8:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Timting wrote:

We are laughing United States walked out of Iraq with virtually nothing and a $trillion of fiscal treasure, only to discover a new and potentially greater power than itself, rising in the East, aren’t we?

May 04, 2014 9:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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