Post-Snowden, the NSA's future rests on Admiral Rogers' shoulders

Comments (17)
StigTW wrote:

So he says he’s horrified but as the man in charge he’s running it and won’t stop it.
He’s a company man – and wouldn’t be there if he wasn’t. Business as usual at the NSA.

May 19, 2014 3:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bastiattheman wrote:

“noting that the NSA programs exposed by former contractor Edward Snowden last year had all been deemed lawful”

Yes, they were deemed lawful by the same people who thought they were a good idea. No conflict of interest there, right? If they were truly lawful then this wouldn’t be such a big deal.

“Rogers said many people in the agency found it both uncomfortable and perplexing to be under public scrutiny.”

Wow, what a horrible thing to be held accountable for your actions. I don’t feel sorry for the NSA workers any more than I do for people who volunteer to be TSA workers. If you want to make money violating civil rights then you deserve to be sad. In fact, that should be your first clue that what you are doing is wrong.

May 19, 2014 6:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bastiattheman wrote:

“noting that the NSA programs exposed by former contractor Edward Snowden last year had all been deemed lawful”

Yes, they were deemed lawful by the same people who thought they were a good idea. No conflict of interest there, right? If they were truly lawful then this wouldn’t be such a big deal.

“Rogers said many people in the agency found it both uncomfortable and perplexing to be under public scrutiny.”

Wow, what a horrible thing to be held accountable for your actions. I don’t feel sorry for the NSA workers any more than I do for people who volunteer to be TSA workers. If you want to make money violating civil rights then you deserve to be sad. In fact, that should be your first clue that what you are doing is wrong.

May 19, 2014 6:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bastiattheman wrote:

“noting that the NSA programs exposed by former contractor Edward Snowden last year had all been deemed lawful”

Yes, they were deemed lawful by the same people who thought they were a good idea. No conflict of interest there, right? If they were truly lawful then this wouldn’t be such a big deal.

“Rogers said many people in the agency found it both uncomfortable and perplexing to be under public scrutiny.”

Wow, what a horrible thing to be held accountable for your actions. I don’t feel sorry for the NSA workers any more than I do for people who volunteer to be TSA workers. If you want to make money violating civil rights then you deserve to be sad. In fact, that should be your first clue that what you are doing is wrong.

May 19, 2014 6:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bastiattheman wrote:

“noting that the NSA programs exposed by former contractor Edward Snowden last year had all been deemed lawful”

Yes, they were deemed lawful by the same people who thought they were a good idea. No conflict of interest there, right? If they were truly lawful then this wouldn’t be such a big deal.

“Rogers said many people in the agency found it both uncomfortable and perplexing to be under public scrutiny.”

Wow, what a horrible thing to be held accountable for your actions. I don’t feel sorry for the NSA workers any more than I do for people who volunteer to be TSA workers. If you want to make money violating civil rights then you deserve to be sad. In fact, that should be your first clue that what you are doing is wrong.

May 19, 2014 6:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bastiattheman wrote:

“noting that the NSA programs exposed by former contractor Edward Snowden last year had all been deemed lawful”

Yes, they were deemed lawful by the same people who thought they were a good idea. No conflict of interest there, right? If they were truly lawful then this wouldn’t be such a big deal.

“Rogers said many people in the agency found it both uncomfortable and perplexing to be under public scrutiny.”

Wow, what a horrible thing to be held accountable for your actions. I don’t feel sorry for the NSA workers any more than I do for people who volunteer to be TSA workers. If you want to make money violating civil rights then you deserve to be sad. In fact, that should be your first clue that what you are doing is wrong.

May 19, 2014 6:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
tpvero wrote:

Does this government press release ease my concerns? I don’t think so. Generals are known liars and so is our government. What we should really read here is that the general and the government will try harder to cover up all future illegal activity. The entire program is an abomination and a direct assault on our rights and the US constitution. There should be people in the NSA and in congress going to prison.

May 19, 2014 6:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
subsonic1982 wrote:

“Rogers said many people in the agency found it both uncomfortable and perplexing to be under public scrutiny”

The NSA didnĀ“t ask the global puclic about how they would feel when having their privacy monitored and collected. People had no chance to opt out of the NSA programs, those decisions were made by the US Government without having a debate with EU partners. Trust is everything between allies and friends.

May 19, 2014 7:01am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Overcast451 wrote:

So this is the next #@$&^%& that will be listening to your calls to mom.

May 19, 2014 8:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
njglea wrote:

We should all be much more concerned with the private, for-profit companies who are gathering the data and can sell it to the highest bidder at any time. China, Russia, Iran – whoever offers the highest price wins. I much prefer that OUR government have the data and we prosecute NSA workers if it’s misused.

May 19, 2014 9:48am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Curmudgeon wrote:

Expected to be retired by 54? Sigh, only in government service.

May 19, 2014 11:03am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Simplerman wrote:

The only people worried about these justified spying programs are either drug dealers, money launderers, Soviet agents, Chinese agents, Islamist terrorists or any combination of the above.

Stop whining. If you’re reasonably obeying US laws and trying to further your life then you’ll thank us later.

May 19, 2014 11:17am EDT  --  Report as abuse
kilroy1111 wrote:

Hello. You are welcome to any data readily available to the public. If you want anything private you need a warrant based on a reasonable suspicion of a specific crime has or is about to occur.

May 19, 2014 2:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Laster wrote:

The comments section appears to be functioning. The last two or three stories concerning the NSA had the comments section closed the minute the story hit the page.

May 19, 2014 9:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

You can fool some of the people all of the time, all of the people some of the time, but not all of people all of the time.
NSA will never ever change their policies towards american citizens or the rest of the world. It will come down to extreme cyber wars, to the point when lights will go out in major cities. It has already started and that day may not be to far away.
Snowden just may be the tip of the iceberg, only matter of time till more come out.

May 19, 2014 9:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
DanPRide wrote:

15 years ago a website was launched which discussed NSA crimes and surveillance.
It was dismissed as ridiculous by all.
It is still up, waiting for the world to catch up.

Now that Snowden has published, perhaps it is time for a second look.

Echelon, as the program was first named, required billions of 1980′s and 90′s dollars to build.

To fund it they engaged in a series of incredibly high profile terrorist actions and cloaked them
in a psyops campaign which was so powerful that when they closed the operation with an arrest
and public trial of the brainwashed patsy, everybody got a good laugh and walked away.

To this day, if you mention the case to anyone over 25, they are flooded with feelings of ridicule and absurdity.
To say the word is to define yourself as a nut.
It worked.

Don’t let it work on you. Ignore those feelings and take a good look at the deep dark world
of the NSA as exposed on the site Unabombers[dot]com

Dan Pride

May 20, 2014 1:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
timeecho wrote:

Mr. Snowden need be tried in absentia and condemned to death. The way we’ve handled it thus far is certain to attract more publicity seekers whom need meaning to their lives at any cost

May 20, 2014 3:50am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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