U.S. accuses China of cyber spying on American companies

Comments (100)
Overcast451 wrote:

LOL!!! Pot, meet kettle.

May 19, 2014 8:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
justin2013 wrote:

Even if it is true, the US authorities can no longer complain about cyber-spying. Unfortunately, my own government is coming off as the biggest hypocritical bunch of jackasses since the old Soviet Union.

May 19, 2014 8:57am EDT  --  Report as abuse
westernshame wrote:

what a joke, the US spies on everyone, allies, enemies, their own citizens….. and their upset because someone is looking back, pathetic nonsense.

May 19, 2014 9:46am EDT  --  Report as abuse
UauS wrote:

That’s funny, American corporations have been shipping jobs and technology to communist China for 20+ years, and now they complain that China is stealing their trade secrets… So cheap labor is not that cheap in the end, huh?
Greed is shortsighted by definition!

May 19, 2014 9:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
UauS wrote:

That’s funny, American corporations have been shipping jobs and technology to communist China for 20+ years, and now they complain that China is stealing their trade secrets… So cheap labor is not that cheap in the end, huh?
Greed is shortsighted by definition!

May 19, 2014 9:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
KyleDexter wrote:

And the Chinese politiburo will formally announce that the US government has been spying on every Chinese government ministry and state owned company in China, which Snowden can testify to.

We really and truely are the most hypocritical nation IN HUMAN HISTORY!!!!!

May 19, 2014 9:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse

We can spy on you but you can’t spy on us?

May 19, 2014 10:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse

We can spy on you but you can’t spy on us?

May 19, 2014 10:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Redford wrote:

Good, do it. Clean up your own house at the same time…

May 19, 2014 10:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Mott wrote:

They have completed the capture of manufacturing technical prowess and on to military sector now.

Here is a theory on flight 370 that seems plausible considering mum from both US and China despite the former having the capability to provide accurate trace data -

- that it was carrying advanced military hardware in its cargo
- that the controls were somehow taken over by US military and flown to a nearby US military base
- flight being dismantled
- China misleads with a staged search effort to pacify local anger

May 19, 2014 10:12am EDT  --  Report as abuse

And the Chinese government is going to hand these folks over to stand trial when? Never. So this indictment means what? Nothing.

May 19, 2014 10:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
nose2066 wrote:

What is so weird about this whole situation is that it would take an enormous amount of effort on the part of the U.S. government agencies, to trace cyber spying back to the individual Chinese people involved in that spying. It would take a huge amount of counter-spying.

May 19, 2014 10:24am EDT  --  Report as abuse

It’s obvious from these comments that people don’t understand the difference between espionage and corporate espionage.

May 19, 2014 10:25am EDT  --  Report as abuse
1Amergal wrote:

I expect that our government is now receiving complaints from the private sector who are losing money because of this. What did they think was going to happen? The Chinese play nice? Yeah, like they’re doing with their neighbors in the seas off their coast.

When Nixon decided to “friend” them, they probably thought they’d won the lottery in the business technology community. We invent, and design, and they use it. Now they, like Russia, want to achieve dominance worldwide at everyone else’s expense.

One note about hypocrisy, we know our government has been spying, but as far as we know it’s for our security not stealing other countries commercial know-how. This is a little different.

May 19, 2014 10:32am EDT  --  Report as abuse
mgunn wrote:

This is a PR campaign. While we do it A LOT more we have an intrinsic and infinite ability to forgive ourselves. The point is to smear another for selfish gain and might as well start now little by little and the absurdity of our hypocrisy will eventually wear off.

May 19, 2014 10:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ellis1W wrote:

This is just hilarious! Just imagine if other countries around the word started to charge those in the US government, its intelligence community and its military with the offences they have committed against other countries….. if they did, and those charged were ever brought to task and convicted, then there wouldn’t be anyone left to run the US

May 19, 2014 10:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ellis1W wrote:

This is just hilarious! Just imagine if other countries around the word started to charge those in the US government, its intelligence community and its military with the offences they have committed against other countries….. if they did, and those charged were ever brought to task and convicted, then there wouldn’t be anyone left to run the US

May 19, 2014 10:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ellis1W wrote:

This is just hilarious! Just imagine if other countries around the word started to charge those in the US government, its intelligence community and its military with the offences they have committed against other countries….. if they did, and those charged were ever brought to task and convicted, then there wouldn’t be anyone left to run the US

May 19, 2014 10:41am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Obviously wrote:

Comparing Chinese intellectual property theft to the activities of the NSA is like comparing a home boat building kit to the building of the Titanic. Both nation’s are in the wrong morally but China is stealing hundreds of billions of dollars in information from the entire world with near impunity every single year for the last 20 years with the direct intention to make those commercial products and sell them back to whence they were stolen at a price no one can compete with. This story is absolutely huge and the children posting here need to realize it. Your future is what’s being stolen, not your Facebook friends list.

May 19, 2014 10:45am EDT  --  Report as abuse
adamrussell wrote:

CNN is reporting that the 5 “individuals” are actually chinese officials.

May 19, 2014 10:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ellis1W wrote:

@1Amergal…. spoken like a well informed American. (snigger snigger)

May 19, 2014 10:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
SoloDolo123 wrote:

What a bunch of Animaniacs! Spy VS Spy

May 19, 2014 10:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
adamrussell wrote:

Hah. Spying is one thing, but when you start stealing secrets from Corporate America thats when we have to do something about it!

May 19, 2014 10:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Art16 wrote:

Throw all of them out of the country, and go on the offensive to snarl their internet and steal from them, or does this administration have no guts?

May 19, 2014 11:01am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sabrefencer wrote:

they have been doing it for almost a decade..you first wake up now??????????????

May 19, 2014 11:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JayMcGoo wrote:

The history of China’s spying against the US http://youtu.be/2Ys57C68DkI

May 19, 2014 11:11am EDT  --  Report as abuse
menehune2012 wrote:

Thieves!

May 19, 2014 11:11am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Volcilord wrote:

When the U.S. spies on everybody and his little brother everywhere and all over the world, what right does it have to complain when someone else is spying on it? Complaining is a pour substitute for developing real computer security.

May 19, 2014 11:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
menehune2012 wrote:

You can tell there’s a lot of Chinese 50cent posters in these comments.

May 19, 2014 11:15am EDT  --  Report as abuse
pvr wrote:

Using the NSA argument to support of China information thefts is ludicrous. They are separate issues. Stealing the livelihood of a nation is a stealth war that the Chinese have been waging against industrialized nations for the past several decades.

May 19, 2014 11:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse
PopUp wrote:

There are few here who understand the difference from copying your Meta data and stealing industry secrets. Companies from the US shipped out their business to China. They can either come back to the US and have their Facebook paged copied or stay in China and have all their industrial designs and secrets stolen for profit by the Chinese.

May 19, 2014 11:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Espionage is espionage, regardless if it is corporate or otherwise.

May 19, 2014 11:17am EDT  --  Report as abuse
FRPSR wrote:

Mocking the U.S. of A.’s position alongside the unresolved tapping disaster in the dumbfounding privacy invasion of the personal devices used by allied heads of state , in the uncontrolled and widespread abuses of the worldwide NSA programs for “information” gathering is a little too rich for irony . At some minimal extreme one might pose that the grounds for these current charges are greed based , profit driven .
This use of the minutia driven rationalizing that the profit motives are at work as the core of this present spying , compared to Americas disturbingly paranoid overreaction to the Bin Laden bombing of the World Trade Center in Manhattan . While president Bush , and his administration , slept through the ample , multiple signals that they were verbally , and systematically , cautioned over is fair only by the slimmest of margins . Hardly what one might call the “High Ground” of moral ascendancy .
The real trouble this will cause the relevant heads of state is the formalizing of the undeclared ongoing war , into one only a gesture away from a hot one . This makes as inevitable , as plain as day is to night , that the parties are now prepared for “extra” diplomatic activity .
We are so close to an “accident” that will require the savage reduction of assets including private , military , allied , etc. , that the emerging Sino assertions of multilateral hegemony are in fact being met with the , in your face , challenge to defend themselves , or cut bait .
They want what they want , and that ain’t chicken .

May 19, 2014 11:26am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Wow, I am proud of all the comments on this topic. D’accord! Means I totally agree in French. I have nothing to add.

May 19, 2014 11:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
FreedomFries wrote:

Lol @ the commies posting. China has been stealing our trade secrets since the 1990s. They suck at innovation. But they excel at stealing..these comments about PRISM are irrelevant. China does that kind of spying also. But what technology has the USA stolen from China lately? Yeah that’s what I thought. No pot meets kettle here. Just a country that can’t innovate trying to save face.

May 19, 2014 11:39am EDT  --  Report as abuse
leonew wrote:

cut off their monthly foreign aid checks. they should send us aid, they have more money than we do. but our leaders still send them welfare checks…

May 19, 2014 11:39am EDT  --  Report as abuse
FreedomFries wrote:

So what technology did the US steal from China lately? Oh that’s right. None. China is a post communist dictatorship that got 100 percent of its technology from the West truly pathetic. And the false equivalences between this and regular spying are typical dishonesty that you see from despitic regimes. As if copying the iPhone is the same thing as comventional spying that every country does.

May 19, 2014 11:44am EDT  --  Report as abuse
UauS wrote:

American corporations complaining about China stealing their technology is like someone who threw family and friends data on Facebook complaining about Facebook stealing their privacy…

May 19, 2014 11:49am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JoeSchmoe123 wrote:

Maybe China can get into the same Cisco routers as the NSA does?

Just reading, that’s all.

May 19, 2014 11:49am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

Last time when we accused the Chinese, posting pictures of a mysterious building in China, Mr. Snowden blew the show. Hope we get better luck this time.

May 19, 2014 11:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
FreedomFries wrote:

The Chinese have been stealing technologies from us since before there evr was a PRISM. So they spied first, and they are the only ones who’ve stolen company secrets. Which is like stealing money from a bank amd calling it sptijg. Thieves they are.

May 19, 2014 11:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
FreedomFries wrote:

Next up the Chinese will steal money out of our bank accounts and call it spying. Lol. “Hey the NSA tapped some phones im basically doing the same thing by robbing a bank.”

May 19, 2014 11:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
hawkeye19 wrote:

Frankly, I’m surprised that the Justice Department even knows about this much less cares enough to take action.

May 19, 2014 12:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
newuser1 wrote:

Please don’t tell me US is not spy on Chinese government!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

US steal top secret from other countries. like top military secrets. We already NSA spy worldwide. The accused spy from china is not even 1/billion of the spy on china from US.

May 19, 2014 12:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
CHOPPERGIRL wrote:

Oh the absurd hypocrisy of the United States Government. United States courts are a laughing stock and everyone here knows it. Immediately the name “Gary Powers” and “U2″ comes to mind; the United States has been so busted for non-stop spying over the years. They lie like a dog and deny it too. In fact, the Untied States has been spying on other countries since its very beginning:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Townsend_(spy)

So to accuse someone else of spying… is a joke. They don’t have a moral piece of dirt anywhere to stand on, because their own hand behind their backs are trying to hold a fistful of smoking guns without dropping one.

May 19, 2014 12:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mstan4408 wrote:

I’ve been saying for several years now that there is no privacy on the Internet. Someone can find you and your server and your computer. lol

I guess the hackers thought it was a joke and they wouldn’t get caught. But when you cheat, yep, sooner or later you get caught.

This is going to be an interesting international legal case. One to watch.

May 19, 2014 12:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mstan4408 wrote:

I’ve been saying for several years now that there is no privacy on the Internet. Someone can find you and your server and your computer. lol

I guess the hackers thought it was a joke and they wouldn’t get caught. But when you cheat, yep, sooner or later you get caught.

This is going to be an interesting international legal case. One to watch.

May 19, 2014 12:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mstan4408 wrote:

I’ve been saying for several years now that there is no privacy on the Internet. Someone can find you and your server and your computer. lol

I guess the hackers thought it was a joke and they wouldn’t get caught. But when you cheat, yep, sooner or later you get caught.

This is going to be an interesting international legal case. One to watch.

May 19, 2014 12:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
eddiemetron wrote:

Pittsburgh is spelled with an “h” on the end, not “Pittsburg”

May 19, 2014 12:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Frosted wrote:

Oh my! Once again, the Pot calling the Kettle black!

May 19, 2014 12:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Richard11 wrote:

All these US companies outsource jobs to China. Stolen trade secrets is the result. The Communist Chinese government is laughing at us.

So whats the lesson here???

STOP OUTSOURCING JOBS TO CHINA !!

May 19, 2014 12:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
evergreen16 wrote:

Wait, that’s it? Billions worth of IP is stolen and trillions of future sales lost, and you indite five guys that will never even get any punishment? This is a joke, right?
China should be punished as a whole, no goods or services suspected to be stolen should ever be allowed to be sold or provided by any Chinese company.
These kinds of acts of war should not be tolerated by the world!

May 19, 2014 12:54pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
NUGrad wrote:

You have no I idea what is going on. US is not doing this stuff. We don’t need to rob Chinese firms. The US does keep watch on a lot of people and a lot of money but this stuff is very different and very intense. The wikileaks is very counter productive because it lets the enemy know what you know. Get with the real world. Do you want a job in ten years? If not, leak a bunch of stuff to the Chinese.

May 19, 2014 12:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Reality2Day wrote:

Everyone spies on everyone, their are no innocent by-standers, just casualties, with some worse off than others.

May 19, 2014 12:58pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

@FreedomFries “So what technology did the US steal from China lately?”

No there’s nothing we could steal there. They got a toy AC in the water, more than a hundred years we had our first in operation. They put something one the moon, decades after we did it on Mars…

But, we store their crown jewel: Socialism. Now everyone is jumping on the idea of big government and hoping others will pay their bills…Oh wait, it’s China who’s paying them today:)

May 19, 2014 1:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TomKi wrote:

Nothing like a defense with an offense. Even when the offense is nonsense.

So the U.S. accuses China’s military of spying on the great American “nuclear power, metal and solar product industries.” China is already a nuclear power with weapons and lots of commercial power plants. China already refine lots of metal, and can easily buy the most advanced metal tools from Europe. China is already the biggest solar panel producer in the world.

What utter nonsense. That the U.S. government has to resort to this kind of stupidity to defend its discredited NSA, the biggest indiscriminate hacker in the world, testifies to the hypocrisy nobody believes.

May 19, 2014 1:09pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
WestFlorida wrote:

Good to see the FBI and Western District of Pennsylvania do something about this. These U.S. corporations can compete, but not if they are constantly targeted by the People Liberation Army. The U.S. does not use its intelligence information to benefit U.S. companies. The only question is “what took you so long to file the charges”? Oh well, better late than never. . . .

May 19, 2014 1:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Californian16 wrote:

First it was Putin and his bully boys invading a weaker neighbor, under the pretext of protecting russian-speaking Ukrainians, then the red chinese bullying weaker neighbors in the south china sea over territory not theirs , and finally the red chinese stealing what our technicians have developed! Is morality an unknown expression in russia and china??

May 19, 2014 1:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gangof4 wrote:

Does this mean we will no longer be spying on them? Or, is the U.S. going to blame the Chinese for doing the same thing to us that we are doing to them?

May 19, 2014 1:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
pilgrimson wrote:

Just to play really dirty, we should let them have Solyndra’s business model.

What new scandal is US trying to head off with this defensive offense?

May 19, 2014 1:54pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Overcast451 wrote:

Yep – just more of the benefits of ‘outsourcing’ – get what you pay for!

May 19, 2014 2:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
carlmartel wrote:

“‘When a foreign nation uses military or intelligence resources and tools against an American executive or corporation to obtain trade secrets or sensitive business information for the benefit of its state-owned companies, we must say, “enough is enough,”‘ U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said…”

Is Holder lying? Is he a complete idiot who has forgotten that US military weapons are made by private companies in the USA? Is he too stupid to understand that US steel workers MAKE the weapons made by US or allied private companies in the USA? Does he believe that the materials (steel, etc) shape themselves into the weapons that the US DoD orders from private companies? That would be some really smart technology if it could be made to work! Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. Further, in China, state-owned companies make most of the high-technology weapons made for the Chinese military.

I’m not going into the US versus Chinese intelligence question because all countries use intelligence. Better intelligence into the effect of machine guns and rapid fire artillery on massed troop formations would have saved millions of lives in WWI. The CIA and the KGB helped keep the US and USSR from burning the entire world to death during the Cold War in which I fought.

May 19, 2014 2:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
tbro wrote:

And what ever became of the pentagon’s statement a few years ago that cyber spying was officially considered an act of war?

May 19, 2014 2:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
okaywhatever wrote:

I see the Chinese PR department is out in full force today. I wonder if they use the same people Russia does for their social media campaigns? The comment section looks familiar.

May 19, 2014 2:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Brent1023 wrote:

If this is the issue, why is the US through the NSA wasting all that energy to collect ALL of the metadata on all calls made by all US citizens? Why is it tracking Angela Merkle? Why is it spying, either directly or indirectly, on the Mines Ministry in Brazil? Why is it intercepting deliveries of Cisco equipment and altering that equipment?
If espionage by Chinese military personnel on US companies is the issue, then how are any of these actions the correct response?
If espionage is a serious issue, then the US should drop all the obsessive data collection on its own citizens which appears to be consuming all NSA resources, and get obsessive about industrial espionage.
Why won’t it? Because when you are a paranoid agency, an agency run by paranoid people, the enemy is everywhere. It is a pack rat mentality. No idea how it could possibly be useful, but you never know. It is a hoarder mentality.
And we know those people are nuts!

May 19, 2014 2:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Mott wrote:

Talk is cheap. Bring some law suits with credible data. Then what? You can’t really do much beyond this as the international laws are complex and not so effective in holding the parties accountable to justice and enforcement is left back to the original nations that defeats the purpose. End result may be related awareness to protect data by more secure means.

May 19, 2014 2:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
carlmartel wrote:

Peter W. Singer wrote the book, Wired for War, that has a chapter, “Robots That Don’t Like Apple Pi,” in which he points out that China studied the 1991 Gulf War and found the vulnerability of the modern US military. Our weapons can be hacked to make US weapons accept Chinese orders. We build the most powerful, technological military in the world, and China orders it to fight the USA. China has had cyber warfare units since the 1990′s, but US Cyber Command did not come into existence on paper until 2009 and had no commander until May 25, 2010. Then, the US BEGAN training troops to do the actual work. China is at least 15 years ahead of the US in cyberwar operations. In addition, the world’s current fastest super computer is in China. The US can’t take its position as a technology leader for granted.

May 19, 2014 3:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
nose2066 wrote:

See this news story says: “American businesses have long urged the government to act against cyber espionage from abroad, particularly by China”.

I suspect that business actually wanted the government to take steps to prevent cyber espionage (provide results) rather than just making a public announcement about it (provide spin).

May 19, 2014 3:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
PaulBradley wrote:

@carlmartel – - he is factually right in his post above. You guys should read it, understand it and THEN make your comment!

May 19, 2014 3:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
pilarski wrote:

Seems someone is confused here. Only a week ago the smart people from Newsweek magazine explained us, in a briliant article, based on the wise sources from Washington, that Israel is the greatest intelligence threat for the United States and the rest of the world, greater than any other threat from a state in the whole world, and therefore poor U.S just have no choice but to keep Jonathan Pollard in prison even after 30 years. Can it be that those wise people from Washington just do not read the Newsweek magazine? He?

May 19, 2014 3:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
PaulBradley wrote:

P.S. The U.S. technology ‘beneficiaries’, militarily or otherwise, as mentioned in @carlmartel’s comment above in reference to U.S./China above, applies to other nations also – e.g. Russia, Israel, etc., etc., etc . . . . .

May 19, 2014 3:56pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
PaulBradley wrote:

@pilarski – - This is NOT meant to be a critique of your comment. However, perhaps, you could explain WHY has Israel/Mossad FREE access to NSA’s ‘raw’ intelligence data, including unfiltered data on U.S. citizens . . . ???????????????

May 19, 2014 4:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

@FreedomFries “So what technology did the US steal from China lately?”

No there’s nothing we could steal there. They got a toy AC in the water, more than a hundred years we had our first in operation. They put something one the moon, decades after we did it on Mars…

But, we stole their crown jewel: Socialism. Now everyone is jumping on the idea of big government and hoping others will pay their bills…Oh wait, it’s China who’s paying them these days:)

May 19, 2014 5:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

@carlmartel “The US can’t take its position as a technology leader for granted.”

True. But there’s little we could do. We got Einstein for free thanks to WWII. But nowadays silicon valley firms have to beg H1B quotas to get workers. Our education system here in California uses majority of the fund feeding pensioners, and our K-12 classrooms are getting filled with Spanish speakers. Recent report showed that UC system took thousands Chinese students who pay non-resident fee over local applicants. So we are an active spy factory right in the high tech heartland…

We do have some native talents who work for NSA, but they are all busy monitoring US citizens. (Don’t know if HSA has filled Snowden’s position yet) I guess Obama is working hard get us new round of talents. But so far things haven’t kept up with his effort starting WWIII. It was quite promising when the Vietnamese started rioting after his trip, yet the flare died in just a few days. Any idea where he should try next?

May 19, 2014 5:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sego wrote:

What fun. And one of the cyber spies is named Wang Dong. You gotta at least love that.

May 19, 2014 5:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

nose2066 “American businesses have long urged the government to act against cyber espionage from abroad, particularly by China”

I guess you were referring to Cisco who was having hard time competing against Huawei. US government did deliver this message and boosted Cisco’s numbers. However after NSA’s PRISM was leaked out, Mr Chambers has been lamenting lately…

What’s Cisco’s intention yelling “watch out Chinese thieves?” It got payments from NSA, is it soliciting payments from the Chinese, as well?

Yes we do need cyber security. But for the moment any effort is a waste when double-agents are guarding the doors.

May 19, 2014 5:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

Repost – apologies for the typos

@FreedomFries “So what technology did the US steal from China lately?”

No there’s nothing we could steal. They got a toy AC in the water, more than a hundred years after we had our first in operation. They put a (dead)rover on the moon, decades after we did it on Mars…

But, we stole their crown jewel: Socialism. Now everyone is jumping on the idea of big government and hoping others will pay their bills…Oh wait, it’s China who’s paying them these days:)

May 19, 2014 5:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

Just heard that China responded by suspending cyber security cooperation. Makes sense – what does pot and kettle have to “cooperate,” anyway.

May 19, 2014 6:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
DessieDeratta wrote:

Lmfao!

This is the America of the Snowden revelations?!!

Things must be getting desperate in the Pentagon….

May 19, 2014 6:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Pterosaur wrote:

It’s apparent that the US probably doesn’t know what the word “shame” means.

May 19, 2014 6:43pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jklfairwin wrote:

The Chinese just haven’t learned the US Justice Department rules yet.
1) Never steal from the 1%, because Obama/Holder will get you.
2) Steal as much as you can get from the 90% and use the stolen money to make political contributions and you are immune from prosecution (see, e.g. the criminal Wall Street banksters).

May 19, 2014 7:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wilhelm wrote:

the jingoism and ethnocentrism of some of the comments above demonstrates that the official report from the NSA spymasters has partly achieved its intended result. rally round the flag boys! they’re stealing our tech! as if US business/government doesn’t do exactly the same thing (what!?!?) and has for decades…

indeed, what the NSA has been shown to be doing on a massive scale is much, much worse than what this report alleges.

May 19, 2014 8:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SpideySense wrote:

“U.S. officials have maintained that they do not steal secrets to give an advantage to U.S. companies, but in China, Lewis said, the line between military and business prowess is unclear.”

So this sums up the crux of the US complaint: America claims to maintain a firewall between government spying and US business. In China, the walls dividing government intelligence and business are purportedly unclear.

May 19, 2014 8:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jingan wrote:

Syria didn’t work, Ukraine didn’t work,failure in Egypt and Libya…lets go after China…

BTW clowns in Washington didnt see it before transferred massive technology to China since 1976 after embracing it as special status nation?

Chinese i believe don’t need to spy anymore they can buy it or simply western corp pigs will sell it to her. Example recent hushed illegal sale of helicopter engine secrets by UTC.

May 19, 2014 8:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Timting wrote:

In an interview with a Hong Kong paper, Edward Snowden asserts the U。S。 has mounted hacking operations against hundreds of Chinese targets since 2009。 Those five members of China’s military are our heroes and we all love them!

May 19, 2014 9:10pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
boonteetan wrote:

Whatever perspective one might take, China is still far behind the US, technologically and militarily speaking. Do not worry, and never try to create a phobia that may be used as a legitimate basis for encapsulating China.

May 19, 2014 9:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
UauS wrote:

@Timting wrote: In an interview with a Hong Kong paper, Edward Snowden asserts… etc.

Edward Snowden is a thief himself… He stole from the US Government he worked for, which cost the US taxpayer a pretty penny and made this country a lot more vulnerable. He deserves to spend the rest of his life in his snow den in Russia.

May 19, 2014 10:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Kailim wrote:

1) What really does the US government want?

I’m sure E. Holder is aware of the fact that he is extremely unlikely to have the 5 indicted Chinese put through due process in an US court. In the absence of a verdict the majority of American public would forever believe that they are criminals.

My opinion is this is a piece of state-of-the-art propaganda.

2) Everybody knows that the internet is utterly unsafe. We therefore never store our important and sensitive data and documents in any internet accessible places. I don’t know what the smart Americans do.

The fact is some Americans have been yelling for Chinese having stolen their secrets and technologies for over 10 years. Do you have any responsibility if not all to try protecting your own valuables?

May 19, 2014 10:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
UauS wrote:

Perfect timing! Putin meets Xi Jinping today…

May 19, 2014 10:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dc2ndtest wrote:

Good luck getting enforceable service let alone judgment enforcement in PRC if if you pevail in US courts?.
Would the USDOJ consider filing in PRC and asking PRC to file an amicus brief in PRC courts if the PRC courts accepted original jurisdiction?

May 19, 2014 11:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dnreb wrote:

This action shows how stupid the US foreign policy is, in order to leave China alone the State Department creates a coalition between Russia and China which the US cannot defeat. The current administration is too stupid to look in the future for more than two years. Elections are more important than peace in the world. They really play with the fire to ignite World War III. Billions will die but who cares.

May 19, 2014 11:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
85reo7 wrote:

It is hard to take this seriously when are government cyber spies on it’s own citizens.

May 19, 2014 12:06am EDT  --  Report as abuse
seymourfrogs wrote:

Going from the sublime to minor (if not trivial), I emailed an engineering company I’ve dealt with, asking about gearwheels for a certain purpose. The email went out via a Microsoft portal. I got a prompt reply.
Ten weeks later, I had an email from a Shanghai company, inviting me to buy one of their gearboxes with apologies in the delay in replying.
I wonder exactly how that happened, ie is it semi-official eavesdropping on everyone; or a private group picking up keywords as we converse; or what?

May 20, 2014 1:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
seymourfrogs wrote:

Going from the sublime to minor (if not trivial), I emailed an engineering company I’ve dealt with, asking about gearwheels for a certain purpose. The email went out via a Microsoft portal. I got a prompt reply.
Ten weeks later, I had an email from a Shanghai company, inviting me to buy one of their gearboxes with apologies in the delay in replying.
I wonder exactly how that happened, ie is it semi-official eavesdropping on everyone; or a private group picking up keywords as we converse; or what?

May 20, 2014 1:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jingan wrote:

“Corpigs” built China to its might reaping profits and now corpigs scare sheeple with horror stories, leading sheeple to new tax increases to defend from……….. “China” they built

May 20, 2014 2:31am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whatsgoingon wrote:

@Kailim “In the absence of a verdict the majority of American public would forever believe that they are criminals.

My opinion is this is a piece of state-of-the-art propaganda.”

It depends on how you look at it. When LE foundation erodes every citizen is at risk. While everyone cheers Bin Laden’s disappearance without a trial, execution of US citizen has become a button.

The risk can become much bigger. What if Bin Laden never existed? This question was unthinkable just a decade ago. After 911, however, it’s becoming more valid day by day, thanks to the “shortcuts” tolerated by the public.

The irony is, while China gradually picks up our legal system, we ditched from multiple levels. From international laws in the UN, to constitutions. When legality is traded for convenience, credibility is gone and everything has to be settled by force. I hate “Putinism” but sadly, we empowered him by losing our leadership. In 1991 we rallied 20+ countries fighting against Saddam’a aggression. But today who will send troops will us?

May 20, 2014 2:59am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Qspinor wrote:

If I am not mistaken, it was revealed last year that the U.S. was indeed conducting industrial espionage on Brazil’s Petrobras oil fields prior to U.S. multinationals entering bid. This for all those die hards that believe that our spying is purely for defense and security. One of I am sure hundreds of cases yet to be unveiled by the Snowden files. I believe we have also been caught red handed spying on German firms.

Be ironic if these companies start suing the NSA easily naming our top NSA proponents for criminal charges since we have just set the precedent. Moreover, this will open up the NSA to private citizens suing NSA spying? This move demonstrates our comically growing incompetence in setting foreign policy with such blatant hypocrisy.

http://www.bbc.com/news/25907502

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/germany-opens-hearings-on-us-spying/2014/04/03/cf58f2d0-b42b-4e59-a403-75f968d6edb0_story.html

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/gchq-and-nsa-targeted-private-german-companies-a-961444.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/09/us-usa-security-snowden-petrobras-idUSBRE98817N20130909

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/brazil-tv-to-release-nsa-documents-that-show-us-spied-on-petrobras/2013/09/08/8c4cdaf6-18d0-11e3-a628-7e6dde8f889d_story.html

May 20, 2014 4:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
NickyMicky wrote:

US double standard,the whole world should sue NSA for violation of privacy.

May 20, 2014 4:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
opuntia wrote:

My question is this: why did these U.S. companies allow their secrets to be connected to the Internet? Couldn’t they have taken their secrets offline and within a closed system?

May 20, 2014 9:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ryan41 wrote:

Hasn’t US learnt anything from the NSA scandal? It is asking for humiliation by doing this. The US needs to stop containing China and invite China to the decision making table to establish rules managing the internet.

May 20, 2014 12:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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