Gunman kills six in drive-by shooting in California college town

Comments (50)
pduff wrote:

Good thing CA has such strict gun laws. Someone might have been able to defend themselves or stopped the killer with a legally owned weapon. Would Love to know if the weapon used was registered and legally carried. My guess would be probably not!

May 24, 2014 8:25am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sophie11rose wrote:

What do you bet this is another young man that was diagnosed with “mental problems” back in middle school just like Lanza and all the other recent mass killers. And just like the rest of them their parents failed to do anything to protect society from their crazy kid, instead they made excuses or like Lanza’s mother supplied the guns.

May 24, 2014 8:30am EDT  --  Report as abuse
3887813 wrote:

Not surprising at all. Liberals have turned California into one giant gun-free zone, so when someone like this starts shooting, no one can defend themselves.

May 24, 2014 8:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JL4 wrote:

@Gideon_71, which is better, 10 incidences of one or more people being killed with a firearm, or 5 incidences of one or more people being killed with a firearm?

I’m PRO-GUNS (one I bought, the other my father gave me) but I’m also PRO background checks to LESSEN the number of deaths with guns, so that crazy people and criminals own FEWER guns. Is that so hard to reconcile? Is that so hard to understand? Does everything have to be all or nothing or can there be middle ground to lessen some of the negative consequences of gun ownership in the wrong hands?

May 24, 2014 8:43am EDT  --  Report as abuse

Gideon_71 fired off 12 rounds of dumb-dumbs.

May 24, 2014 8:46am EDT  --  Report as abuse
MonitorLizard wrote:

Gideon_71 obviously isn’t playing with a “full deck.”

May 24, 2014 9:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
lag46 wrote:

@Gideon_71. Your idiotic comments don’t help the cause but they do fuel the the other side.

May 24, 2014 9:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
DougAnderson wrote:

@pduff

Yeah, too bad some guy didn’t take out his Glock and started blasting away at the shooter in the car. Do you think he would have aimed for the shooter or would he have tried to shoot the car’s tires? Because if it was the second, we could have a cool moment where the car flips over and bursts into flames.

Real life isn’t a movie. Moron.

May 24, 2014 10:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
CF137 wrote:

JL4 wrote: I’m also PRO background checks to LESSEN the number of deaths with guns, so that crazy people and criminals own FEWER guns.

————-

JL4….Wow, you really think that mass-murdering, harden criminal street thugs go to “Dick’s Sporting Goods” to buy their guns. hahaha

“Um sorry sir, we can’t sell you this gun because it looks like you have…um…14 felonies on your record.”

Wow, grab a clue dude.
They buy them from their friends on the street.

May 24, 2014 10:30am EDT  --  Report as abuse
gregbrew56 wrote:

The focus shouldn’t necessarily be on gun control…it should be on crazy control.

May 24, 2014 10:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
diluded0000 wrote:

First off, I’m not saying people don’t have a right to own guns. They do. But when you armchair badasses (pduf, gideon, 388) start thinking how, “if I was there, and had my gun, I could have been a hero and saved those people”, you are pretty much delusional. And if you think a bunch of college kids carrying around guns would make the world safer, you are just off your frigging rockers.

Any of you toughguys ever been on the wrong end of a gun? I’ve been in multiple situations where I could have legally killed someone in self defense, and it isn’t like on TV, and it isn’t like when you practice at your NRA gun range. The chance of you using your guns to protect yourself are about ten times less than you using your gun to accidentally shoot someone, intentionally shoot a family member, or commit suicide. And the chances of you committing assault by pointing a firearm are even higher, usually by pointing it at a family member when you are drunk.

You people need to quit spouting this nonsense about how much safer the world would be if everybody carried a gun around. Psychos would still go on tragic rampages, they are crazy and don’t care if they live or die: an armed populace isn’t a deterrent. But with more guns accidental and intentional gun crime would increase.

May 24, 2014 10:59am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JL4 wrote:

@CF137, no I don’t think they go to Dick’s Sporting Goods. I think they go to their friends, too. You’re right about that. But they also go to dealers who are not required to perform background checks.

I don’t think we’ll ever have a society where people don’t get killed. We’ll never have a system that protects us that well. But we can (again) LESSEN the number of gun-related deaths.

You seem to be of the opinion that if we can’t stop them all, then we shouldn’t stop any of them. More people die that way. It’s only logic.

May 24, 2014 11:31am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Mangog7227 wrote:

There are no prostitutes in his area??

May 24, 2014 11:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
G_E wrote:

Another state with the strictest gun control laws in the nation!!! To bad Kalifornia is trying to circumvent the second amendment.

May 24, 2014 12:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bobinmo wrote:

A CA native, I’ve never been happier I now moved to a state where I can keep my concealed weapon on me AT ALL TIMES. There’s actually states out there that understands mentally ill and very bad people will always have guns. It’s just us law abiding citizens that are denied the right to bare arms. Be it insane financial or mental instabilities that starts from the governor on down, CA is no longer a place I’d ever live in again.

May 24, 2014 12:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dcayman wrote:

Legal prostitution would have alleviated this young man’s problems…perhaps a trip to South Korea or Thailand…both countries well known for prostitution

May 24, 2014 12:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
carnivalchaos wrote:

Regardless of all the gun loving manure that the right spreads about how guns make us more safe, nothing can dispel the FACT that the United States has more guns per capita than any other developed country and we also have the highest rate of gun violence. (And for those who think they’re driving a clever point by stating that Mexico has a higher rate of gun violence, please consider the following: 1) Mexico is our immediate neighbor to the south; 2) Mexico gets most of its guns from the US; 3) most of the Mexican countryside has little in common with the US and more in common with 3rd world nations; 4) Mexican Presidents have been begging the US for years to do something about the gun trafficking from the US into Mexico, but we won’t because the gun industry has powerful lobbyists who defend the practice of keeping the border free from restraint in order to maximize industry profits.)

Furthermore, states with weaker gun control laws rank higher in gun violence than states with stronger gun control laws: http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/AmericaUnderTheGun.pdf

And if that’s not enough, countries throughout the world that have strict gun laws have considerably lower rates of gun violence than the US. Like it or not, fewer guns means less gun violence. Anyone claiming otherwise is simply lying.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2012/12/14/chart-the-u-s-has-far-more-gun-related-killings-than-any-other-developed-country/

http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2014/jan/17/lisa-bloom/americans-are-20-times-likely-die-gun-violence-cit/

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/09/13/2617131/largest-gun-study-guns-murder/

May 24, 2014 12:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ANZUS wrote:

Ref: 14th Amendment (No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws)
In reference to comments related to background checks. If one understands that one cannot, through society remove completely the flow of an object (guns, drugs, enter your disliked object here) and that mental conditions like sociopathic etcetera, never truly diagnosed or expressed to a noticeable level given the ridiculous behaviour, that is now accepted as just “different”, then those checks will never be truly effective. The point that I wish to highlight is that even people who have committed felonies, have a right to defend themselves against aggression, if released back into society, having “paid for” their crimes. I do not argue that the release process is without questionable behaviour itself, that some criminals should never again be among us, however it returns to the fundamental point of the 14th amendment, equal protection under the law, whilst in society. What people who invariably challenge this generally fail to agree with, is that their protection in life, is their responsibility, not the States.

May 24, 2014 12:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
pyradius wrote:

Most of these lone wolf psychos do ultimately get their guns from a legal source, so I am not sure why anyone would even try and pretend otherwise. You think Mr. Rejected-By-Society just goes down to his local banger and picks up a piece? Lol. Bangers definitely kill innocents but more frequently they kill other bangers with their illegal weapons. Psychos like this typically get their gun from a legit source before they go on their murder spree.

May 24, 2014 1:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Dr_Steve wrote:

One sheriff calls it a “premeditated atrocity.” Another calls it “the work of a madman.” Since insanity negates malice aforethought, which is it? Methinks it was the work of the drug cartels. All the gun control laws in the world are unable to stop them from their appointed rounds.

May 24, 2014 1:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
euro-yank wrote:

Big problem – no religious right wing citizen is ever going to agree with adding “how sexually frustrated are you?” to the background check.

May 24, 2014 1:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bugzy wrote:

How come the NSA didn’t stop this mass murder since they had all information. This is same as terrorism and shouldn’t be seen as different. I fee very sad for his parents, he needed to talk to someone, go to strip club, lay with a prostitute or just look for normal people like himself to relate with.

May 24, 2014 2:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
carnivalchaos wrote:

More guns make us less safe. No matter how you dice that up, it still remains true. Since we’re not going to outlaw guns, all we can do is pass laws that will aid in reducing gun violence. That means that the argument that says this law wouldn’t have stopped that incident of gun violence or that law wouldn’t bring an end to gun violence doesn’t have any place in this national discussion. In other words, there are no laws that can completely end gun violence, so we have to look to laws that make it harder for criminals and loons to acquire guns. Again, the goal isn’t to make it impossible. That would be nice, but it’s not doable. But we CAN make it more difficult, and background checks are one such way. No one needs an assault weapon to hunt, to protect his or her home, or for range shooting. We can eliminate assault weapons. We can also limit the size of magazines made available to the public. And please, we don’t need to allow guns in bars. We should also make gun owners carry a greater responsibility for their guns. If a gun is used in a crime, the gun owner bears some responsibility and should be penalized.

And for those who seem to think the Constitution is supposed to restrict our right to self-determination, don’t think for a minute that our Founders would support the idea of Americans running around shooting each other with assault weapons. They were wise and practical men. The guns available at the time were muskets. We live in current America. They lived 238 years ago. We must apply common sense to shape a better society TODAY. A majority of TODAY’S Americans support background checks and a ban on assault weapons. And for God’s sake, let’s do a better job of ending the gun trafficking into Mexico. We have a moral responsibility which shouldn’t be trumped by the gun industry’s desire to maximize their profits.

May 24, 2014 2:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bugzy wrote:

Legalise professional prostitution in order to help people like this. This wouldn’t have happened in Amsterdam. Social media is killing real interactions and real friendships. The shooter would have been saved if he had true friends and not just fake Facebook, Twitter and YouTube freaks.
Social media is so fake that kids don’t understand and they get messed up. Go out, meet real people, know their friends, know their families, play sports together and do real things and say F U to FB, Twitter and the rest

May 24, 2014 2:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
carnivalchaos wrote:

Bugzy: “Dutch gun laws are actually quite strict. Gun ownership is seen not as a right, but a privilege, with hunting and target shooting the only two legitimate reasons for owning a gun.”

http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/gun-laws-netherlands

Point being, the availability of legal prostitution isn’t the only reason this is unlikely to have happened in Amsterdam.

May 24, 2014 2:43pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bugzy wrote:

@carnivalchaos…….. You can waste all your time on gun issues but the problem is the “people”. The world and America need more happy people, more sane people and more calm people. The government don’t care about reducing burden on citizens, making normal life (shelter, food, fuel) affordable. Too much laws also creates side effects, ban prostitution and you get frustrated people. Why not restrict prostitution to professionals who can offer therapy in form of sex to clients. Too much people here yapping about guns……..that ain’t the point anymore. Every citizen in any country deserves help but the society is ignoring the real problems.

May 24, 2014 3:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bugzy wrote:

Same for the drug cartels, they wouldn’t kill each other if drugs were cheap and legalised for medical use. America can take over drugs production and legalise it for therapy use only. Make these drugs cheap, bankrupt drug dealers, make drug cartels in Mexico jobless.

May 24, 2014 3:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
carnivalchaos wrote:

Sorry Bugzy, but saying “the world and America need more happy people” does not constitute a solution. I agree with much of what you’re saying, but unless someone finds a really super magic wand, we’re going to have to tackle our problems one at a time, step at a time. Relaxing gun laws goes in the opposite direction. We have to at least be intelligent enough to start with the premise that the more guns you have and the more liberal you make your gun laws, the more gun violence you’re going to have. That is why countries with a lot of guns per capita and liberal gun laws have more gun violence. That is why countries that don’t have a lot of guns and have strict gun laws have little gun violence. That is why the South (USA), where there is a high gun per capita count and very liberal gun laws, has the highest incidence of gun violence. This is not some inscrutable revelation I’m laying out. The United States seems to be the only place where people aren’t smart enough to understand this simple hypothesis: more guns + liberal gun laws = more gun violence. Everyone else gets us. Everyone but us.

May 24, 2014 5:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

A lot has been learned about this tragedy since I posted a comment earlier. Looks like another case of “Affluenza”.

It looks like this rich kid was soooo horny, he lost his mind… didn’t somebody tell him about masturbation? Or prostitutes?

This “perfect gentleman” suffered from extreme narcissism, in my humble opinion.

The kid’s parents were too busy making money and living the sweet life?

The victims or their families should sue the killer’s parents for creating and fostering a lethal public nuisance.

May 24, 2014 5:42pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

This is also an article today in the great Democrat meca of California.

“A California mother was charged on Friday with first-degree murder in the stabbing deaths of her three daughters – all younger than 3 years of age – at their home in a working-class suburb of Los Angeles, prosecutors said.”

Where is the outrage over this? Not one comment because she used a knife instead of a gun. Democrats only care about a tragedy if they can use it to advance their adgenda.

May 24, 2014 6:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@carnivalchaos

Sorry Carnivalchaos DC has the strictest gun laws and the highest rate of gun violence in the US. So your whole premise is proven wrong. The US doesn’t have the top gun violence rate, and tossing out all of the countries that don’t fit your premise does not make it valid.

The dubious distinction of having the most gun violence goes to Honduras, at 68.43 homicides by firearm per 100,000 people, even though it only has 6.2 firearms per 100 people. Other parts of South America and South Africa also rank highly, while the United States is somewhere near the mid-range. Still, America sees far more gun violence than countries in Europe, and Canada, India and Australia, which is perhaps how it gets its bloody reputation among comparatively peaceful nations.

May 24, 2014 6:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bikeamtn wrote:

Knowing that not all situations lead to such senseless, violent acts as today, we are still mindful of tragedies like the Pittsburgh-Area School Bloodbath, Centennial CO, Sparks NE, Newtown, CT, Chardon, OH, Aurora theater, Denver and the list goes on, two-three each year, every year, all the way back to 1988 and as Dr. Michael Welner (a leading psychologists and homicides consultant) had put it during the Newtown shooting interview; “…systemically we need to address it as a social phenomenon.”

It is nearly unanimous among experts that teen violence is a learned behavior.

For our young, growing in a 21st century world where titillation by media and electronic devices jockey for attention (although a good side), have ad peddlers often presenting life in a tinselized sort of way. This life style of care-free, showy pretense can be viewed as personal choice but at the social cross-roads, where actions touch the lives of others is a different (and prohibitively limiting) matter.

With a rising behavior for texting while driving, social bullying and the sociopath seeking fame by horrific destruction of life (also on the rise), what words of wisdom can we share with this generation? On the subject of seeking social acceptance, my advice for ‘Generation Y’ (or The Entitlement Generation); start with ground-zero, examine one’s heart and how it can be motivated in being receptive to the hearts and outward expressions of others. It’s a connected world, we must learn to work and live together and the best teacher is by example. Just some thoughts gathered from listening to and speaking with many seniors over the years.

We start out teaching such values in life as equality, a fairness demeanor but lately the parental message has been; ‘get all the gusto you can and get ahead.’ Be the bully and get ahead but we cry, don’t be a bully.

May 24, 2014 6:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
igot wrote:

Welcome to the reaping of what the liberals have sown.

30 plus years of the socialist liberal experiment in our school systems:

political correctness, participation trophies, entitlements, everyone is equal, time outs and coddling instead of real punishment, zero tolerance, the pushing of mind altering drugs at the behest of the schools, etc…

Everything except teaching kids that life isn’t as easy as the liberals want you to believe. These kids have been coming out of school with no “real world” expectations. They believe and expect everything will be given to them by the government. And when a “real world” problem arises they don’t know how to handle it -

Just as at Columbine, Newtown, Aurora, Virginia Tech – all kids who
couldn’t handle the “real world” – all kids living on the promises of a failed socialist and liberal agenda.

Congrats liberals and socialists, all the victims’ blood is on your hands.

May 24, 2014 7:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
igot wrote:

Welcome to the reaping of what the liberals have sown.

30 plus years of the socialist liberal experiment in our school systems:

political correctness, participation trophies, entitlements, everyone is equal, time outs and coddling instead of real punishment, zero tolerance, the pushing of mind altering drugs at the behest of the schools, etc…

Everything except teaching kids that life isn’t as easy as the liberals want you to believe. These kids have been coming out of school with no “real world” expectations. They believe and expect everything will be given to them by the government. And when a “real world” problem arises they don’t know how to handle it -

Just as at Columbine, Newtown, Aurora, Virginia Tech – all kids who
couldn’t handle the “real world” – all kids living on the promises of a failed socialist and liberal agenda.

Congrats liberals and socialists, all the victims’ blood is on your hands.

May 24, 2014 7:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
slimjims wrote:

Please correct:

Janet Napolitano is the president of the UC system, not the UCSB

Elliot Rodgers is a student at Santa Barbara City College, not UCSB

May 24, 2014 7:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Fbear0143 wrote:

One more case of domestic terrorism that will be labeled the work of a disturbed individual. Until Americans are willing to do something about the absolute abuse of the second amendment as a means to inflict terror on fellow citizens, there will be no stop to these heartless and horrible acts.

May 24, 2014 7:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ralphooo wrote:

Rejection by WOMEN caused you to spray bullets everywhere?

Son, stop for half a minute and look around you.
Women are everywhere!
You just have to close your eyes, reach your hand out and . . . . .
Oh, sorry. Too late.

So sad.

For all other frustrated guys, don’t make the same mistake.
Pick up a bunch of flowers before you pick up the firearm.
Could be dandelions. Plastic flowers.
Anything but a weapon. Leave that alone.
Take a deep breath, smile and carefully hand your flowers to the first female you see who is just sitting around doing nothing much.
Her appearance makes no difference. Nor does yours.
Look in her eyes. Smile again. She takes the flowers and smiles back.
Gently offer her your hand. The two of you take a stroll.
Keep that smile on. Listen carefully to every word she says.
Don’t start talking about yourself.
Stay calm. Be really, really nice.
Several hours later: problem solved.

May 24, 2014 7:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
lag46 wrote:

After Newton, improved laws concerning mental illness/access to firearms was promised by some politicians icluding the President. Who else promised the legislation and what is the current status of the legislation? Or, has it fallen by the wayside due to more pressing concerns?

May 24, 2014 8:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bugzy wrote:

Ralphooo is so old school. You are the main problem here………flowers for somebody you don’t know, what if the girl has a boyfriend or married? I hope you are not a loner, get some real help. Rich kids need to step down in class, too much snobbery and fake lives. Rich kids should go to common place to pick up girls or pay a prostitute. I don’t care if you fall in love with a whore as long as you don’t kill anybody. The shooter wasn’t rejected, he was just punching above his weight. If a poor guy, no name like me asks 1000 girls in Beverly Hills out, it would be 1000 rejections. How about I ask girls working at McDonald’s out…….should be achievable. There are beautiful girls working in restaurants and the have “vagina” too and they are more polite as they don’t use coke and stuff.

May 25, 2014 5:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bugzy wrote:

Ralphooo is so old school. You are the main problem here………flowers for somebody you don’t know, what if the girl has a boyfriend or married? I hope you are not a loner, get some real help. Rich kids need to step down in class, too much snobbery and fake lives. Rich kids should go to common place to pick up girls or pay a prostitute. I don’t care if you fall in love with a whore as long as you don’t kill anybody. The shooter wasn’t rejected, he was just punching above his weight. If a poor guy, no name like me asks 1000 girls in Beverly Hills out, it would be 1000 rejections. How about I ask girls working at McDonald’s out…….should be achievable. There are beautiful girls working in restaurants and the have “vagina” too and they are more polite as they don’t use coke and stuff.

May 25, 2014 5:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse
euro-yank wrote:

Having read Bikeamtn’s comments 10 times (REUTERS – can you not fix your posting problems!??!) I have to agree wholeheartedly. For the sake of profit, we’ve created a very broken society.

May 26, 2014 1:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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