Texas homeowner solves mansion cliff-hanger by burning down the house

Comments (16)
Barbd wrote:

oh well/ one less mcmansion`

Jun 13, 2014 1:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Barbd wrote:

oh well/ one less mcmansion`

Jun 13, 2014 1:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Barbd wrote:

one less ugly butt mcmansion`

Jun 13, 2014 2:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlexisKlatt wrote:

Welcome to the future. With extreme weather systems becoming our new normals, we’re going to be seeing a lot of this stuff going on, globally.

Jun 13, 2014 2:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wilhelm wrote:

incredibly stupid.

Jun 13, 2014 4:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
2Borknot2B wrote:

Couldn’t figure out a way to do it without the pollution, not in TX, I forgot the environment isn’t real there. L.

Jun 13, 2014 7:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
paintcan wrote:

I can think of a lot my dad once bought years ago and got out from under within a year of purchase. It was ocean front property with a steep cliff that eroded every year and fell into Cape Cod Bay. Every year the house that sits on it now gets closer to the edge.

@AlexisKlatt, and not just on oceans either. They’ll be some swamped river frontage along the coasts too. Bye Bye Big Easy. People could try to remove the French Quarter and Garden District to higher ground – if they can overcome historic preservation law: in New Orleans case that will hurt them eventually and trap the structures till they drown. Or just build a good modern clone? Instead of building these McMansions, why aren’t the affluent building substitutes – even using old pieces or good copies adapted to modern needs before they loose them all? Both old New Orleans neighborhoods were pedestrian friendly, served by street cars and were compact. People almost lust for real estate in old neighborhoods or small New England towns with character, but developers seldom build more like them anywhere. And those old neighborhoods were usually built before the industrial revolution and the cause of their demise. Modern copies or adaptations may not be such money pits the old ones can be, either. When the old ones are swamped they could be recycled and their decorative details used in part for the compatible new location. An entire community could make plan for the eventual demolition and reconstruction of the Presbytere and Cabildo – even the Cathedral on the square. And they wouldn’t have to take all of the older structure, just it’s most important parts. What’s the value of historic buildings that may be drowned in a few decades? A new community could leave blanks for the eventual evacuation and reconstruction of the most important older buildings. I don’t want to think about what that might cost by then. New Orleans may not be able to raise the levees much more and frequent Katrina scale storms could cause them all to just give up or it will be too expensive to live there anymore.

The house above looked tacky. If the homeowner had built a New Orleans style house along the lines of the French Quarter homes and not that pseudo French mini hotel particulier on its own acre, he could have had a courtyard house with back wing for rent or guests etc in a neighborhood of the same. Modern houses tend to be far fussier inside than the old buildings and contain numerous small and specialized spaces and much more complex services. The old sturctures were what a British architectural critic, Rehner Banham called, “long life, loose fit, low energy buildings”. And the people who live in them, love them that way.

Why not build more of them and make them ample but simple instead of labor intensive and complex and don’t automatically scale it all for the convenience of the automobile and parking requirements? Or encourage smaller vehicles? Real estate developers are not that imaginative and neither are most of their customers.

And most of them don’t know a good building from that hole in the ground. But almost everyone likes the Quarter. Or is that just for the breasts, the booze and the bands? I think you have to wait till someone dies, and have a few million, to get a house in the Garden District.

Jun 13, 2014 7:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
smartermind wrote:

A fool and his money are easily parted.

Jun 13, 2014 7:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MonitorLizard wrote:

I guess someone sold him a “bridge.”

Jun 13, 2014 10:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Incitatus1 wrote:

“Couldn’t figure out a way to do it without the pollution, not in TX, I forgot the environment isn’t real there. L.”

Actually this would be a violation of the Texas Clean Air Act” you can only burn brush and unpainted untreated lumber, violation is a criminal act. They can actually take you to jail for burning treated lumber or plywood, etc.
I assume they got some sort a waiver because there was no other way to remove the house safely, then again maybe they didn’t. So sorry 2Borknot2B you’ll have to try and find another reason to hate Texas…

Jun 13, 2014 12:03am EDT  --  Report as abuse
doer wrote:

shore a lotta class envy out there.

Jun 17, 2014 6:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
doer wrote:

shore a lotta class envy out there.

Jun 17, 2014 6:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
doer wrote:

shore a lotta class envy out there.

Jun 17, 2014 6:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
doer wrote:

shore a lotta class envy out there.

Jun 17, 2014 6:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
doer wrote:

shore a lotta class envy out there.

Jun 17, 2014 6:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
paintcan wrote:

These pictures are really another “face eating zombies” variant. The views of the cliff are very inconsistent on other sites and in some appear to be reinforced concrete retaining walls and in others, natural stone – chalk or limestone. The house apparently straddled the cliff or retaining wall and was not undermined. The amount of rubble at the bottom of the cliff doesn’t look like a landslide occurred at all.

A very strange story.

Never the less, its one of the few times the subject of architecture is ever mentioned on this site even if its one of the silliest ways to talk about it.

Jun 20, 2014 6:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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