Ridesharing service Sidecar raises $10 million, tweaks model

Comments (3)
SeanOSullivan wrote:

Sidecar, Uber, Lyft and Hailo are all really cool forms of taxi-like transport services, so it’s very newsworthy and I’m glad to see Sidecar has gotten some additional finance from some decent venture names.

But Reuters, shame on you for calling these on-demand car services “ridesharing”. As Sidecar is highlighting here, these are premium services that are often more expensive than taxicabs. Where’s the “sharing” in that? Paid drivers earning a targeted $25-$35/hour is a great economic opportunity for drivers… but it’s not sharing.

Despite the efforts of the Ubers and the like to redefine ridesharing, it already has a legal and accepted definition: basically, it’s carpooling, when you are actually sharing the cost of the journey, like http://car.ma does with its Carma carpooling app. (Disclosure: I’m Managing Director of Carma).

That said, the idea of having peer-to-peer taxicabs is a fine idea and it is a great development in the marketplace for transport options in major cities of the world that have the density to support taxicab style services. So I’m not against the ideas of the service, just for the deceitful marketing claims that accompanying it, as well as the perversion of the term “ridesharing”.
Sean

Feb 19, 2014 2:09pm EST  --  Report as abuse
johnkh wrote:

Meanwhile, drivers for Uber X, Lyft, and Sidecar still conceal from their personal auto-insurance that their using their cars commercially. If their insurance companies knew, they would likely cancel their policies.

They have to do their driver-for-hire on the down low. It’s a funky business model, since it’s dependent upon drivers committing insurance fraud in order for their business to be financially viable and sustainable.

Feb 19, 2014 8:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
johnkh wrote:

Meanwhile, drivers for Uber X, Lyft, and Sidecar still conceal from their personal auto-insurance that their using their cars commercially. If their insurance companies knew, they would likely cancel their policies.

They have to do their driver-for-hire on the down low. It’s a funky business model, since it’s dependent upon drivers committing insurance fraud in order for their business to be financially viable and sustainable.

Feb 19, 2014 8:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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