North Korea's new leaders lash out at South Korea and allies

Comments (25)
ChangeWhat wrote:

All he’s missing is the cognac and sunglasses!

Dec 29, 2011 10:18pm EST  --  Report as abuse
W-DS wrote:

“and – most independent observers believe – sank a South Korean naval vessel.”

Since when? Didnt Russia, China and several other countries who sent experts find a wall when trying to gain access to the “evidence”?

Other independents – Ironically, or intentionally perhaps- with no connections, professionally, to the countries who were involved in the Korean war have also been denied access to the wreckage/other “evidence”

Apart from experts from countries involved in the Korean war, nobody has gained access, so the word independent is amusing at best.

On top of the above, didnt a South Korean military chief have to quit/was forced to resign because he doubted the official story? After seeing the “evidence”/intel reports? Which to this day has lead to at least 2/3rds of South Koreans refusing to believe it was North Korea.

Dec 29, 2011 10:21pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Islander2010 wrote:

North Korea still defiant, bellicose and belligerent….oh, and still broke!

Dec 29, 2011 11:02pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Fill wrote:

Wait… Who’s the puppet? What’s the new NK leader’s REAL words? Let’s hear him, not the establishment that’s probably happily sent him into the playground where he can play video games and watch movies and play with the gen..s of kidnapped movie stars in the basement.

Dec 29, 2011 11:06pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Fill wrote:

Wait… Who’s the puppet? What’s the new NK leader’s REAL words? Let’s hear him, not the establishment that’s probably happily sent him into the playground where he can play video games and watch movies and play with the gen..s of kidnapped movie stars in the basement.

Dec 29, 2011 11:06pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Fill wrote:

Translation: “Angry that Iran is trying to steal our attention! …on the other hand, I have Kippumjo…”

Dec 29, 2011 11:15pm EST  --  Report as abuse
StevenSky wrote:

The North says they won’t change. But the South doesn’t have the gut to say that enough is enough, we want to unite. This maybe an opportunity of unite in 60 years. What a waste! How did the South elect their president who didn’t do anything?

Dec 29, 2011 11:16pm EST  --  Report as abuse
rbren wrote:

Well it’s apparent Kim-Dum’s military studies were comprised of playing video games while eating Cheezy Puffs.

Dec 29, 2011 11:30pm EST  --  Report as abuse
single_malt wrote:

I really wish all leaders on all sides would STFU and just focus on taking care of their people. The world cannot afford anymore foolish wars. Intelligent people find ways to get along while stupid ones find ways to kill those who think and act differently. Just once, maybe we could try something different than death, destruction and mayhem. LOL.. not that it will ever happen. Stupid people rule the earth.

Dec 30, 2011 12:17am EST  --  Report as abuse
WFH wrote:

With half the population starving and the other half freezing, who is the fool now!

Dec 30, 2011 12:41am EST  --  Report as abuse
Informative wrote:

Cheezy Puffs? Try Donuts, Pizza and Captain Crunch.

Dec 30, 2011 1:01am EST  --  Report as abuse
Bear589 wrote:

…………yawn…………

Dec 30, 2011 1:02am EST  --  Report as abuse
broadcast wrote:

Lets put it this way, when Kim Jong il passed away, I was hopeful that a peaceful dialog with Kim Jong-un and his advisors would occur between North and South Korea. However, this sabre-rattling from the North saddens me. One third of North Korea is impoverished which says the government under Kim Jong Il simply was not working. I really don’t believe any other country than China itself would want to govern North Korea – hence I think the North has been brainwashed into paranoia. They can build bombs, but they cannot seem to give aide to their own people – what is wrong with this picture? My advise to the young Kim Jong Un is to wake up and smell the coffee – he’s now in change and can open North Korea to more diplomatic ties with surrounding nations that would help the North Korean people he leads. Start going nuclear and Kim has the most to lose! Funny that their liaison with China has not helped North Korea very much if aide from China is hard to come by? Here’s hoping Kim Jong-Un puts the hard line rhetoric to rest and becomes a true leader to his people. Spending money on bombs rather than enriching his own people seems very short-sighted!

Dec 30, 2011 1:03am EST  --  Report as abuse
andresminas wrote:

North Korea’s leadership is a cult. It will never hesitate to let its own people die of hunger and disease with its fanatical military to boot. China should better engage an army of psycho analysis experts to understand fully the situation before it’s too late.

Dec 30, 2011 1:05am EST  --  Report as abuse
Nivek1834 wrote:

@StevenSky

I would say it has something to do with the number of active hardened artillery positions within range of Seoul, the heart of South Korea’s economy. Unless Pyongyang pulls them out to fire, there is no chance of preempting an artillery barrage — especially with the TOT tactics the KPA likes. Other than that think of the economic backlash that would come with integrating an economic powerhouse with a country lacking an economy — think East and West Berlin. I’d say Lee Myung-bak is not a fool after all; just like most other countries, there are always political issues the president would rather his successor deal with.

Dec 30, 2011 1:07am EST  --  Report as abuse
AZWarrior wrote:

The fact that the world allows these criminals to enslave an entire nation, shames all of mankind. Talk will not right a wrong, only action.

Dec 30, 2011 1:52am EST  --  Report as abuse
Islander2010 wrote:

Who are you calling “puppet”, puppet? Or should I call you “Supreme Puppet”?

Dec 30, 2011 2:07am EST  --  Report as abuse
Islander2010 wrote:

When the North Koreans are bellicose, that means they are in a defensive mode or confused. It is when they are ominously silent, that’s the time to watch out.

However, now is not the time to do anything to spook them. Let them sort out their internal power struggles. Who knows? We may be lucky and a pragmatic faction may emerge.

Dec 30, 2011 3:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
Dave1968 wrote:

AZWarrior wrote:
The fact that the world allows these criminals to enslave an entire nation, shames all of mankind. Talk will not right a wrong, only action.

That’s it exactly- This is the real Iraq -what a sad statement on humanity

Dec 30, 2011 4:12am EST  --  Report as abuse
schreck2538 wrote:

isnt it funny how the bad guys dont realise they are ‘the bad guys’!they are finished,economicaly,politicaly;they build horrendously expensive nuclear weapons at the expense of their population,who have little or nothing to eat!of course they blame the u.n. for that?!the fact that these so-called ‘leaders’have brainwashed themselves to a communistic standstill only re-enforces ‘the good-guys’ opinion that this destitute state is run by madmen carrying the ultimate’big stick’!….to call this situation ‘worrying’ doesnt cut it!
be very sure that a dozen thumbs are hovering over a dozen’launch’buttons right now!the word ‘terrifying’ does cut it.

Dec 30, 2011 5:30am EST  --  Report as abuse
BurnerJack wrote:

I often wonder what it is that causes the North to lash out against the South. If it is jealosy brought about by the overwhelming disparity in quality of life and economic standing, the North need to remember that this is a selfinflicted condition. They have the power to keep it as such, OR, follow Big Brother China and embrace capitalism. Not only would it improve their country on all fronts, it would also increase the wealth of the ruling parties dramatically.
An outsider can only shake their head and wonder why they don’t. Sad.

Dec 30, 2011 10:52am EST  --  Report as abuse
geesam47 wrote:

That’s North Korea’s table-top politics. What really goes on under-the-table with the international community is more important.

Dec 30, 2011 1:14pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Yowser wrote:

I expect little, if any, change at this point. Most of the rest of the world outside North Korea is used to the idea that a state must take the welfare of its people into account, if it expects to long endure. The fact that the North Korean government has existed in its present form for as long as it has proves that idea is not necessarily true. This is what you get when the welfare of the state and its leaders is made paramount. The people are wholly subordinate to the state. Since living in this position is all they know, they support the status quo or find themselves relegated to the gulag or the cemetery. The risk to peace presented by such a nation certainly does bear watching.

Dec 30, 2011 3:41pm EST  --  Report as abuse
BurnerJack wrote:

It has always amazed me that when someone is handed total power over a people, they would choose to be just another dictator bent on maintaining the status quo, to be insignificant in the annals of time.

The alternative is to be the one who would live in the memory of a nation as the one who brought prosperity, hospitals, schools, abundance of food for a nation. Surely, this is the very definition of immortality. Maybe this guy should see “The Wizard of OZ”. As the moral of the story, being revealled at the end is most fitting.

Dec 30, 2011 4:53pm EST  --  Report as abuse

This was just an initiation test for the young Kim Jung UN, from the top brass in the north to see what he is made of. If he stands the heat and talks thrash against the south he is good for them as a leader. If he breaks who knows he may get an accidental heart attack too, he looks fat like his father.

Dec 30, 2011 10:09pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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