Author of U.S. online piracy bill vows not to buckle

Comments (20)
zachruss1987 wrote:

This has nothing to do with internet counterfeiters or American businesses. Its more about congressman’s pockets being lined by media companies. In addition they get an easy way to silence the people filtering what they see unfit or threatening, in turn leveling internet access in the US to the equivalent of other totalitarian countries like Iran, China, and Syria.

Jan 12, 2012 9:27pm EST  --  Report as abuse
borisjimbo wrote:

Smith, who are you working for, your constituents or your donors?

Jan 12, 2012 9:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse
S2art wrote:

Smith should be made the ambassador to North Korea. I’m sure he would feel right at home.

Jan 12, 2012 9:47pm EST  --  Report as abuse
moxsee wrote:

It seems ironic how the censorship of Chinese websites by their government is considered a violation of free speech. We gasp in shock when China puts regulations on Google and its search engine. Now it suddenly seems like the right thing to do for America. Intellectual property should always be protected but this seems like the wrong approach. Maybe we should take a look at other forms of enforcement rather than censorship. Hopefully this is just political grandstanding preceding the election year.

Jan 12, 2012 9:55pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Darr247 wrote:

Why can’t the current DMCA be used to block those sites?

This seems like a way around due process, et al. All it takes is a judge’s order, totally bypassing the 5th, 6th and 7th amendments’ protections.

Jan 12, 2012 10:23pm EST  --  Report as abuse
taxcorps2 wrote:

Being a Democrat, it is surprising to me that, as a Republican, the guy wants to enact some regulation, rather than deregulation. I do not believe it will “break the internet”, and it doesn’t bother me a bit to put some kind of lid on the activities of the internet companies such as google and facebook, etc. As far as i am concerned, they are attempting to be Big Brother incarnate.

Jan 12, 2012 10:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Mr.Bidness wrote:

This bill will never pass, nor should it. Let’s not get worked up. Let Smith get his payola for filling his end of the bargain with his corporate donors and slush fund contributors, and his karma will inevitably catch up with him. Meanwhile, there’s no way a Democratic led (senate/president) branch would pass this law.

Jan 12, 2012 11:06pm EST  --  Report as abuse

Follow the money. Another “bought and paid for” Congressman.

Jan 13, 2012 9:18am EST  --  Report as abuse
Matt.Simmons wrote:

How much is this guy getting paid by Hollywood companies I wonder?

It’s funny though that they think this will somehow stop piracy especially considering the largest piracy site “thepiratebay.org” will be immune from this bill. The only thing this bill will do is hurt US consumers. But hey at least Lamar Smith will get a few extra million in his pocket to buy another house.

Jan 13, 2012 11:44am EST  --  Report as abuse
shillela1 wrote:

He is surprised that there is opposition to a government takeover of the Internet?

He is surprised that his lies about $100 billion in losses draw more opposition? Perhaps he would be willing to explain the basis for these claims (since the government’s own accountants say they are false).

Jan 13, 2012 1:02pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Nullcorp wrote:

“It is amazing to me that the opponents apparently don’t want to protect American consumers and businesses,” Republican Representative Lamar Smith told Reuters in a telephone interview.

It is amazing to me that an old man who don’t understand the internet wants to make decisions about its operational functionality.

Sometimes I think the country will never get back on track until the current crop of politicians die of old age. The world has changed a lot since this guy was young, and people like him just don’t get it.

The brain loses its neuroplasticity – its ability to learn new information – as it ages. Maybe instead of requiring, for example, the President to be older than a certain age, we should prevent people over a certain age from running for public office. The world that existed when this guy’s brain was still functioning correctly is not the same world that the rest of us live in today.

Jan 13, 2012 1:49pm EST  --  Report as abuse
WillaLV wrote:

Time for action against online piracy/counterfeiting is long overdue. Piracy is not about sharing, it’s about theft FOR profit. The central focus of this illicit business model is not P2P sites like the oft-mentioned Pirate Bay. It’s the cyberlocker (cloud-based storage) sites that earn millions through ads and subscriptions. They use pirated content (uploaded by an eager base of affiliates who earn cash for doing so) to attract traffic to their websites. It’ about the money, money earned by stealing the work of others.

Of course companies like Google are leading the charge against legislative action because they also profit from this rampant content theft. Ask them how much of their 9.3 BILLION in ad profits came from ads on pirate/counterfeit websites? The hyperbole and inflammatory rhetoric are red herrings designed to obscure the facts. If one reads the manager’s amendment, many of the legitimate concerns with the legislation have been addressed.

The time for reasonable action is long overdue. Illegal activity on the internet should not be above/beyond the law. Government has long stepped in to regulate commerce. Just as legit commerce has moved online, so too has the illicit kind. If left un-checked the diversity and quality of content will suffer. Time for piracy profiteers to be held accountable.

Jan 13, 2012 2:46pm EST  --  Report as abuse
drannmaria wrote:

So, big government is bad if it taxes capital gains or regulates bank practices that
lead to an economic crisis, but it is good if it regulates the Internet?

How exactly does that work?

Jan 13, 2012 2:54pm EST  --  Report as abuse
rpopstar wrote:

But the Texas representative says giving Washington sweeping powers over the Internet is necessary to protect free enterprise.

“we had to destroy the village in order to save it.”

Jan 13, 2012 2:58pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Yazilliclick wrote:

Thanks for covering this! The only thing I wished is that for the amount of quotes from Lamar Smith you have that you covered what his experience and knowledge is of the topic. From all accounts I’ve seen he lacks basic knowledge about the technologies he’s trying to legislate and has no interest in listening to experts on it. This really brings into question why he’s wanting to force this through so badly while critizing companies who speak out who are experts in the field.

Jan 13, 2012 3:46pm EST  --  Report as abuse
mySCRIPPSnews wrote:

Who is Congressman Smith trying to fool!?!? What he’s really doing is protecting corporations’ mass profits, he doesn’t care about the American people nor the economy. His loyalty isn’t to the people he’s suppose to serve, it’s to corporations and special interest groups. If he was man enough, he’ll abandon SOPA and actually listen to people and to reason!!!

Jan 13, 2012 4:47pm EST  --  Report as abuse
rowenacherry wrote:

@Darr247

You ask “Why can’t the current DMCA be used to block those sites?”

The answer is many foreign sites simply ignore DMCA notices. If a site ignores a notice of copyright infringement and a request to remove an illegal file (or book), there is nothing that an author or artist can do.

Jan 13, 2012 4:50pm EST  --  Report as abuse
rowenacherry wrote:

The DMCA cannot be used to block foreign sites because if a site ignores DMCA notices and refuses to remove copyright infringing material, the DMCA does not work.

Jan 13, 2012 5:01pm EST  --  Report as abuse
oldtechie wrote:

Mr. Smith, I have a few questions.
You’re a Republican, right? And Republicans complain that Democrats are responsible for strangling business with regulation, right? Do technology and the Internet in particular are the most viable American businesses, but you want to strangle them with regulation right?
If you are concerned about counterfeiting, how about enforcement of current laws that are being flaunted by counterfeit drugs and electrical components which are safety hazards for Americans, not just a few pennies lost royalties for media billionaires?
Are you just interested in making something else illegal so you can put more people in for profit jails like you did for making crack penalties more than coke, so more blacks got jailed and can no longer vote against you?
Maybe you like the idea of middle class families being practically bankrupted by the media moguls because their kid downloaded a Christmas song from a pirate site.
And finally, do you even know what the Internet is? “Just a bunch of pipes” eh, like Ted Stevens said?

Jan 14, 2012 2:27am EST  --  Report as abuse
oldtechie wrote:

Mr. Smith, I have a few questions.
You’re a Republican, right? And Republicans complain that Democrats are responsible for strangling business with regulation, right? Do technology and the Internet in particular are the most viable American businesses, but you want to strangle them with regulation right?
If you are concerned about counterfeiting, how about enforcement of current laws that are being flaunted by counterfeit drugs and electrical components which are safety hazards for Americans, not just a few pennies lost royalties for media billionaires?
Are you just interested in making something else illegal so you can put more people in for profit jails like you did for making crack penalties more than coke, so more blacks got jailed and can no longer vote against you?
Maybe you like the idea of middle class families being practically bankrupted by the media moguls because their kid downloaded a Christmas song from a pirate site.
And finally, do you even know what the Internet is? “Just a bunch of pipes” eh, like Ted Stevens said?

Jan 14, 2012 2:27am EST  --  Report as abuse
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