September 12, 2007 / 5:49 AM / 10 years ago

Google health exec Adam Bosworth to leave company

3 Min Read

<p>Google Vice President Adam Bosworth in an undated file photo. Bosworth, a pioneering software developer and the executive in charge of Google's slow-to-materialize health-information push, has left the company to pursue other interests, Google said on Tuesday.Google/Handout</p>

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Adam Bosworth, a pioneering software developer and the executive in charge of Google's slow-to-materialize health-information push, has left the company to pursue other interests, Google said on Tuesday.

The Web search leader confirmed a report on the industry blog Search Engine Land that Bosworth, a vice president, had left the Mountain View, California-based company.

"Adam is a great talent and was instrumental in starting Google Health," Google Inc spokesman Steve Landon said in a statement. "He is now on vacation and has decided to pursue other opportunities after that."

Marissa Mayer, the head of Google's core search products business, will run the health team for an interim period until a new leader takes over. "Google is moving forward with work on our health products," the company said.

He is the second executive in the past month to say he would leave Google's 44-strong executive team -- three years after the company's initial public offering. Chief Financial Officer George Reyes said he would retire by the end of 2007.

Bosworth, who joined Google three years ago, had been thought by Google watchers to be at work on a major new health service. Since last year, speculation has centered on ideas ranging from a health information search service to a way for allowing Google users to create a personal medical record.

"People need the medical information that is out there and available to be organized and made accessible to all," Bosworth said in an official company blog post late in 2006. "Patients also need to be able to better coordinate and manage their own health information," he wrote.

So far, in the health field, Google has only introduced Google Co-op, a mechanism that allows users to tag, or classify specialized types of data, including health information.

In the mid-1990s Bosworth had helped pioneer XML, or Extensible Markup Language, which provides the underpinning for organizing and classifying different types of information on the Web, a process popularly known as tagging.

Before joining Google he was a vice president of BEA Systems.

Previously, he held management positions at Microsoft Corp, where he helped define XML standards and a Web coding system known as Ajax, which has given birth in recent years to a new class of easier-to-use Web applications referred to as Web 2.0. He developed the Quattro spreadsheet program for early database software maker Borland Software in the 1980s.

0 : 0
  • narrow-browser-and-phone
  • medium-browser-and-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser
  • wide-browser-and-larger
  • medium-browser-and-landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser-and-larger
  • above-phone
  • portrait-tablet-and-above
  • above-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet-and-above
  • landscape-tablet-and-medium-wide-browser
  • portrait-tablet-and-below
  • landscape-tablet-and-below