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Steve Jobs "Lost" interview lands in movie theaters
November 5, 2011 / 12:31 AM / 6 years ago

Steve Jobs "Lost" interview lands in movie theaters

Apple CEO, Steve Jobs, speaks [to the media] in London at the launch of the European iTunes online music store June 15, 2004.

LOS ANGELES (TheWrap) - Add movie star to the many accomplishments of the late Steve Jobs.

One of Steve Jobs’ most memorable TV interviews appeared in the 1995 PBS miniseries “Triumph of the Nerds.” Just 10 minutes of footage of Jobs at his bitter best -- he’d just been ousted from Apple, the company he co-founded -- made it into the documentary, but the special’s filmmaker has turned up the complete 70-minute interview he conducted with Jobs.

The complete chat, titled “Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview,” will be released for a two-day-only showing in Landmark Theaters on November 16 and 17.

Robert Cringely, the producer of “Triumph of the Nerds,” thought the original tape of his interview with Jobs had been lost. But the tape resurfaced after Jobs’ October 5 death, and Cringely tells the Los Angeles Times that an email exchange with Landmark owner Mark Cuban led to a deal to turn the VHS tape interview into a big-screen worthy project.

“Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview” includes Jobs thoughts on the company that he felt had betrayed him, and lighter moments, according to Cringely, like Jobs’ anecdote about pretending to be Henry Kissinger and prank calling the pope.

“He was great that day,” Cringely told the Times. “He was a cranky guy. I think we see that.”

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