Reuters

Beijing's toxic smog was years in the making, had many sources

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People visit the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

People visit the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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A nurse puts in a drip for a baby diagnosed with respiratory diseases at a provincial children's hospital in Hefei, Anhui province January 16, 2013. Days after choking smog blanketed China's capital, the country's premier-designate added his voice to appeals to curb the toxic haze, but he offered few specifics and said there was no quick fix. Particulate matter with a 2.5 micrometer diameter, known as PM2.5, can cause...more

A nurse puts in a drip for a baby diagnosed with respiratory diseases at a provincial children's hospital in Hefei, Anhui province January 16, 2013. Days after choking smog blanketed China's capital, the country's premier-designate added his voice to appeals to curb the toxic haze, but he offered few specifics and said there was no quick fix. Particulate matter with a 2.5 micrometer diameter, known as PM2.5, can cause cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer and acute respiratory infection, according to the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. REUTERS/Stringer
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Children are put on drips as many of them are diagnosed with respiratory diseases at a provincial children's hospital in Hefei, Anhui province January 16, 2013. Days after choking smog blanketed China's capital, the country's premier-designate added his voice to appeals to curb the toxic haze, but he offered few specifics and said there was no quick fix. Particulate matter with a 2.5 micrometer diameter, known as PM2.5, can cause...more

Children are put on drips as many of them are diagnosed with respiratory diseases at a provincial children's hospital in Hefei, Anhui province January 16, 2013. Days after choking smog blanketed China's capital, the country's premier-designate added his voice to appeals to curb the toxic haze, but he offered few specifics and said there was no quick fix. Particulate matter with a 2.5 micrometer diameter, known as PM2.5, can cause cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer and acute respiratory infection, according to the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. REUTERS/Stringer
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A couple wearing a mask and a scarf visits the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

A couple wearing a mask and a scarf visits the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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A woman wearing a mask walks on the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

A woman wearing a mask walks on the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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A woman wearing a mask walks on the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

A woman wearing a mask walks on the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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A couple wearing masks visits the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

A couple wearing masks visits the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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Travel photos are displayed in a photography service shop at the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

Travel photos are displayed in a photography service shop at the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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A woman wearing a mask stands at the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song

A woman wearing a mask stands at the Bund in front of Pudong Lujiazui financial area on a hazy day in Shanghai January 16, 2013. Chinese media said on Monday the government had to take urgent action to tackle air pollution, which has blanketed parts of the country at dangerous levels in recent days, and one newspaper called for a re-think of a "fixation" on economic growth. REUTERS/Aly Song
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Paramilitary police officers take part in an indoor training session on a foggy day in Zhengzhou, Henan province January 16, 2013. The heavy smog that shrouded central and eastern parts of China in recent days is expected to disappear gradually starting on Wednesday as a cold front moves in, and experts gave suggestions on how to deal with similar weather, China Daily reported. REUTERS/China Daily

Paramilitary police officers take part in an indoor training session on a foggy day in Zhengzhou, Henan province January 16, 2013. The heavy smog that shrouded central and eastern parts of China in recent days is expected to disappear gradually starting on Wednesday as a cold front moves in, and experts gave suggestions on how to deal with similar weather, China Daily reported. REUTERS/China Daily
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Paramilitary police officers take part in an indoor training session on a foggy day in Zhengzhou, Henan province, January 16, 2013. The heavy smog that shrouded central and eastern parts of China in recent days is expected to disappear gradually starting on Wednesday as a cold front moves in, and experts gave suggestions on how to deal with similar weather, China Daily reported. REUTERS/China Daily

Paramilitary police officers take part in an indoor training session on a foggy day in Zhengzhou, Henan province, January 16, 2013. The heavy smog that shrouded central and eastern parts of China in recent days is expected to disappear gradually starting on Wednesday as a cold front moves in, and experts gave suggestions on how to deal with similar weather, China Daily reported. REUTERS/China Daily
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