Reuters

Dozens held after Islamists attack Algerian gas field

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File photo of the gas field in Amenas, Algeria in this handout photo provided by Scanpix April 19, 2005. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik/Statoil via Scanpix

File photo of the gas field in Amenas, Algeria in this handout photo provided by Scanpix April 19, 2005. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik/Statoil via Scanpix
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Mokhtar Belmokhtar, identified by the Algerian interior ministry as the leader of a militant Islamic group, is pictured in a screen capture from an undated video distributed by the Belmokhtar Brigade obtained by Reuters January 16, 2013. Belmokhtar, an Algerian who fought against Soviet forces in Afghanistan in the 1980's, has claimed responsibility for the January 16 kidnapping of up to 41 foreigners at an Algerian gas field,...more

Mokhtar Belmokhtar, identified by the Algerian interior ministry as the leader of a militant Islamic group, is pictured in a screen capture from an undated video distributed by the Belmokhtar Brigade obtained by Reuters January 16, 2013. Belmokhtar, an Algerian who fought against Soviet forces in Afghanistan in the 1980's, has claimed responsibility for the January 16 kidnapping of up to 41 foreigners at an Algerian gas field, according to media reports. REUTERS/Belmokhtar Brigade/Handout
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A general view of Norwegian oik firm Statoil headquarters in Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix

A general view of Norwegian oik firm Statoil headquarters in Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix
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A road sign indicating In Amenas, about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this undated picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The In Amenas gas...more

A road sign indicating In Amenas, about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this undated picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The In Amenas gas field is operated by a joint venture including BP, Norwegian oil firm Statoil and Algerian state company Sonatrach. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The...more

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The gas field is operated by a joint venture including BP, Norwegian oil firm Statoil and Algerian state company Sonatrach. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The...more

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The gas field is operated by a joint venture including BP, Norwegian oil firm Statoil and Algerian state company Sonatrach. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The...more

An undated general view of the In Amenas gas facility about 100 km (60 miles) from the Algerian and Libyan border, is seen in this picture provided by Norwegian oil company Statoil January 16, 2013. Islamist militants attacked a gas production field in southern Algeria January 16, 2013, kidnapping at least nine foreigners and killing two people including a French national during a dawn raid, local and company officials said. The gas field is operated by a joint venture including BP, Norwegian oil firm Statoil and Algerian state company Sonatrach. REUTERS/Kjetil Alsvik / Statoil/Handout
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The Public Relations manager of JGC Corp Takeshi Endo answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. A source at a Japanese engineering firm JGC Corp. confirmed that five Japanese nationals were kidnapped in Algeria on Wednesday, Japan's Jiji news agency said. JGC is involved in gas production...more

The Public Relations manager of JGC Corp Takeshi Endo answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. A source at a Japanese engineering firm JGC Corp. confirmed that five Japanese nationals were kidnapped in Algeria on Wednesday, Japan's Jiji news agency said. JGC is involved in gas production work at Ain Amenas in southern Algeria. Mandatory Credit. REUTERS/Kyodo
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A Public Relations staff of JGC Corp answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kyodo

A Public Relations staff of JGC Corp answers reporters' questions regarding Japanese nationals who were kidnapped in Algeria, at its headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo in this photo taken by Kyodo January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kyodo
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Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix

Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix
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Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix

Lars Christian Bacher, director for international affairs at Norwegian oil firm Statoil, gives a news conference in regards to the attack at gas field in Algeria, at Stavanger, Norway in this picture provided by Scanpix January 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kent Skibstad/Scanpix
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