Reuters

Pakistan Shi'ites demand protection from militants

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Shi'ite Muslims shout slogans as they protest near the covered bodies (not in picture) of Saturday's bomb attack victims during a sit-in in Quetta February 18, 2013. Pakistani Shi'ites furious over a sectarian bombing that killed 85 people protested on Monday, demanding that security forces protect them from hardline Sunni groups. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

Shi'ite Muslims shout slogans as they protest near the covered bodies (not in picture) of Saturday's bomb attack victims during a sit-in in Quetta February 18, 2013. Pakistani Shi'ites furious over a sectarian bombing that killed 85 people protested on Monday, demanding that security forces protect them from hardline Sunni groups. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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A Shi'ite Muslim girl offers afternoon prayers along with others during a sit in protest against Saturday's bomb attack in Quetta's Shi'ite Muslim area, in Karachi February 18, 2013. Pakistani Shi'ites furious over a sectarian bombing that killed 85 people protested on Monday, demanding that security forces protect them from hardline Sunni groups. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A Shi'ite Muslim girl offers afternoon prayers along with others during a sit in protest against Saturday's bomb attack in Quetta's Shi'ite Muslim area, in Karachi February 18, 2013. Pakistani Shi'ites furious over a sectarian bombing that killed 85 people protested on Monday, demanding that security forces protect them from hardline Sunni groups. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Shiite Muslims gather to protest against Saturday’s bomb attack in Quetta's Shi'ite Muslim area, in Lahore February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after a sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

Shiite Muslims gather to protest against Saturday’s bomb attack in Quetta's Shi'ite Muslim area, in Lahore February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after a sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza
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A man prepares graves for the burial of victims of Saturday's bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after the sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

A man prepares graves for the burial of victims of Saturday's bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after the sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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Women gather to attend the funeral of victims of Saturday's bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after the sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

Women gather to attend the funeral of victims of Saturday's bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after the sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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Women gather to attend the funeral of victims of Saturday's bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after the sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

Women gather to attend the funeral of victims of Saturday's bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 17, 2013. Pakistan's unpopular government, which is gearing up for elections expected within months, faced growing anger on Sunday for failing to deliver stability after the sectarian bombing in the city of Quetta killed 81 people. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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Smoke rises after a bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area of the Pakistani city of Quetta February 16, 2013. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

Smoke rises after a bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area of the Pakistani city of Quetta February 16, 2013. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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A man (C) grieves his brother who was killed in a bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, at a hospital in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 16, 2013. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

A man (C) grieves his brother who was killed in a bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, at a hospital in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 16, 2013. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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A man grieves his brother who was killed in a bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, at a hospital in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 16, 2013. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

A man grieves his brother who was killed in a bomb attack in a Shi'ite Muslim area, at a hospital in the Pakistani city of Quetta February 16, 2013. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed
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