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Life as an astronaut

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Member of the International Space Station crew U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson tests a space suit during pre-launch preparations at the Baikonur cosmodrome March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Maxim Shipenkov/Pool

Member of the International Space Station crew U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson tests a space suit during pre-launch preparations at the Baikonur cosmodrome March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Maxim Shipenkov/Pool

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International Space Station crew members U.S. astronaut Joseph Acaba (2nd R) and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka (L) and Sergei Revin undergo a medical procedure at the Baikonur cosmodrome May 10, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

International Space Station crew members U.S. astronaut Joseph Acaba (2nd R) and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka (L) and Sergei Revin undergo a medical procedure at the Baikonur cosmodrome May 10, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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The International Space Station crew member Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield holds his suit during a training at Baikonur cosmodrome December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

The International Space Station crew member Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield holds his suit during a training at Baikonur cosmodrome December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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The International Space Station crew member Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin is seen inside the Soyuz spacecraft during training at Baikonur cosmodrome October 10, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

The International Space Station crew member Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin is seen inside the Soyuz spacecraft during training at Baikonur cosmodrome October 10, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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A centrifugal machine with Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy inside, spins during a training session at the Star City space centre outside Moscow September 6, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

A centrifugal machine with Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy inside, spins during a training session at the Star City space centre outside Moscow September 6, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Chinese astronaut Wang Yaping lies inside a centrifugal machine during a training at Beijing Aerospace City in Beijing, April 25, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer

Chinese astronaut Wang Yaping lies inside a centrifugal machine during a training at Beijing Aerospace City in Beijing, April 25, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer

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International Space Station crew member Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov undergoes final examination at the Star City space center outside Moscow September 1, 2011. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

International Space Station crew member Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov undergoes final examination at the Star City space center outside Moscow September 1, 2011. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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International Space Station crew member Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield (L) plays chess with U.S. astronaut Thomas Marshburn at Baikonur cosmodrome December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

International Space Station crew member Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield (L) plays chess with U.S. astronaut Thomas Marshburn at Baikonur cosmodrome December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Csilla Orgel, a geologist with Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, collects geologic samples for study at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert March 2, 2013. The MDRS aims to investigate the feasibility of a human exploration of Mars and uses the Utah desert's Mars-like terrain to simulate working conditions on the red planet. Scientists, students and enthusiasts work together developing field...more

Csilla Orgel, a geologist with Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, collects geologic samples for study at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert March 2, 2013. The MDRS aims to investigate the feasibility of a human exploration of Mars and uses the Utah desert's Mars-like terrain to simulate working conditions on the red planet. Scientists, students and enthusiasts work together developing field tactics and studying the terrain. All outdoor exploration is done wearing simulated spacesuits and carrying air supply packs and crews live together in a small communication base with limited amounts of electricity, food, oxygen and water. Everything needed to survive must be produced, fixed and replaced on site. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

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Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission return after collecting geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert March 2, 2013. The MDRS aims to investigate the possibility of a human exploration of Mars and uses the Utah desert’s Mars-like terrain to simulate working conditions on the red planet. Scientists, students and enthusiasts work together to develop...more

Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission return after collecting geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert March 2, 2013. The MDRS aims to investigate the possibility of a human exploration of Mars and uses the Utah desert’s Mars-like terrain to simulate working conditions on the red planet. Scientists, students and enthusiasts work together to develop field tactics and study the terrain while wearing simulated spacesuits and carrying air supply packs. They live together in a small communication base with limited space and supplies. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

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NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (L) and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Korniyenko take part in a survival training exercise at Star City outside Moscow January 31, 2014. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (L) and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Korniyenko take part in a survival training exercise at Star City outside Moscow January 31, 2014. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

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Russian cosmonauts Alexander Samoukutyaev (C) and Elena Serova (R), and U.S. astronaut Barry Wilmore take part in a survival training exercise near the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

Russian cosmonauts Alexander Samoukutyaev (C) and Elena Serova (R), and U.S. astronaut Barry Wilmore take part in a survival training exercise near the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow January 29, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Russian cosmonaut Elena Serova takes part in a survival training exercise near the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow January 28, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

Russian cosmonaut Elena Serova takes part in a survival training exercise near the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow January 28, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samoukutyaev is seen through a view-port as he dives in a space suit as part of a training session in a swimming pool at the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow February 13, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samoukutyaev is seen through a view-port as he dives in a space suit as part of a training session in a swimming pool at the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow February 13, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Russian cosmonaut Elena Serova prepares to get into a space suit as part of a training session in a swimming pool at the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow February 13, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

Russian cosmonaut Elena Serova prepares to get into a space suit as part of a training session in a swimming pool at the Russian cosmonaut training facility in Star City outside Moscow February 13, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio and Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (R) attend a training exercise at the Star City space center outside Moscow, August 7, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio and Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (R) attend a training exercise at the Star City space center outside Moscow, August 7, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins (L), Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (C) and Sergey Ryazanskiy walk to attend a training session at the Baikonur cosmodrome, September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins (L), Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (C) and Sergey Ryazanskiy walk to attend a training session at the Baikonur cosmodrome, September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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An Orthodox priest blesses International Space Station crew members U.S. astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (2nd R) and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano (R) before they leave a hotel for a final pre-launch preparation at the Baikonur cosmodrome May 28, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

An Orthodox priest blesses International Space Station crew members U.S. astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (2nd R) and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano (R) before they leave a hotel for a final pre-launch preparation at the Baikonur cosmodrome May 28, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Space suits are seen laid out before U.S. astronaut Christopher Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin and Pavel Vinogradov take part in a training exercise on a simulator at the cosmonaut training center in Star City outside Moscow February 28, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

Space suits are seen laid out before U.S. astronaut Christopher Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin and Pavel Vinogradov take part in a training exercise on a simulator at the cosmonaut training center in Star City outside Moscow February 28, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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Members of the International Space Station crew, U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev are pictured in a bus prior to their pre-launch preparation at the Baikonur cosmodrome March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Members of the International Space Station crew, U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev are pictured in a bus prior to their pre-launch preparation at the Baikonur cosmodrome March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

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U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins (L), Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (C) and Sergey Ryazanskiy pose inside the Soyuz spacecraft at the Baikonur cosmodrome, September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins (L), Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (C) and Sergey Ryazanskiy pose inside the Soyuz spacecraft at the Baikonur cosmodrome, September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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The Korean Peninsula is seen at night, with North Korea in the middle almost completely dark compared to neighboring South Korea (bottom right) and China (top left), in this photo taken by the Expedition 38 crew aboard the International Space Station January 30, 2014. The photograph was cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed at source. REUTERS/NASA-JSC/Handout

The Korean Peninsula is seen at night, with North Korea in the middle almost completely dark compared to neighboring South Korea (bottom right) and China (top left), in this photo taken by the Expedition 38 crew aboard the International Space Station January 30, 2014. The photograph was cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed at source. REUTERS/NASA-JSC/Handout

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NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, an Expedition 36 flight engineer, photographs Earth some 250 miles below him from the Cupola aboard the International Space Station in this NASA image released on June 10, 2013. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, an Expedition 36 flight engineer, photographs Earth some 250 miles below him from the Cupola aboard the International Space Station in this NASA image released on June 10, 2013. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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Astronaut James H. Newman waves during a spacewalk preparing for the release of the first combined elements of the International Space Station on November 20, 1998. The Russian-built Zarya module, with its solar array panel visible here, was launched into orbit on November 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on December 4, 1998, NASA's space shuttle Endeavour launched Unity, the first U.S. piece of the complex. During three spacewalks on...more

Astronaut James H. Newman waves during a spacewalk preparing for the release of the first combined elements of the International Space Station on November 20, 1998. The Russian-built Zarya module, with its solar array panel visible here, was launched into orbit on November 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on December 4, 1998, NASA's space shuttle Endeavour launched Unity, the first U.S. piece of the complex. During three spacewalks on the STS-88 mission, the two space modules built on opposite sides of the planet were joined together in space, making the space station truly international. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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Expedition 37 commander Fyodor Yurchikhin (L) holds the Olympic torch that will be used to light the Olympic flame for the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia after Expedition 38 cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin handed it over aboard the International Space Station in this still image from NASA Tv video, November 7, 2013. REUTERS/NASA Tv

Expedition 37 commander Fyodor Yurchikhin (L) holds the Olympic torch that will be used to light the Olympic flame for the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia after Expedition 38 cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin handed it over aboard the International Space Station in this still image from NASA Tv video, November 7, 2013. REUTERS/NASA Tv

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Aurora Australis or "Southern lights" are seen in this picture captured by astronauts on the International Space Station while they passed over the Indian Ocean, September 17, 2011. Auroras are light shows provoked by energy from the Sun and fueled by electrically charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field, or magnetosphere. In this case, the space around Earth was stirred up by an explosion of hot, ionized gas from the...more

Aurora Australis or "Southern lights" are seen in this picture captured by astronauts on the International Space Station while they passed over the Indian Ocean, September 17, 2011. Auroras are light shows provoked by energy from the Sun and fueled by electrically charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field, or magnetosphere. In this case, the space around Earth was stirred up by an explosion of hot, ionized gas from the Sun - a coronal mass ejection that left the Sun on September 14, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, the commander of the International Space Station, is seen on a screen holding the new Canadian five dollar bill, made of polymer, while on a mission in space, as he takes part in a video conference during an unveiling ceremony at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa April 30, 2013. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, the commander of the International Space Station, is seen on a screen holding the new Canadian five dollar bill, made of polymer, while on a mission in space, as he takes part in a video conference during an unveiling ceremony at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa April 30, 2013. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

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Space shuttle Endeavour Commander Mark Kelly does a back-flip at the request of a reporter at a Tucson television station during a news conference from aboard the International Space Station in this image from NASA TV May 25, 2011. REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout

Space shuttle Endeavour Commander Mark Kelly does a back-flip at the request of a reporter at a Tucson television station during a news conference from aboard the International Space Station in this image from NASA TV May 25, 2011. REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout

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The Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-132) and part of the International Space Station are seen while the two spacecraft remain docked May 17, 2010. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

The Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-132) and part of the International Space Station are seen while the two spacecraft remain docked May 17, 2010. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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Dwarfed by the International Space Station, NASA astronauts Andrew Feustel (R) and Greg Chamitoff (L) work during their first spacewalk of the STS-134 mission in support of construction and maintenance of the ISS May 20, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

Dwarfed by the International Space Station, NASA astronauts Andrew Feustel (R) and Greg Chamitoff (L) work during their first spacewalk of the STS-134 mission in support of construction and maintenance of the ISS May 20, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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The Soyuz TMA-09M capsule carrying the International Space Station crew of U.S. astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano lands in a remote area near the town of Zhezkazgan in central Kazakhstan November 11, 2013. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

The Soyuz TMA-09M capsule carrying the International Space Station crew of U.S. astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano lands in a remote area near the town of Zhezkazgan in central Kazakhstan November 11, 2013. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

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Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield gestures with a thumbs up after the Russian Soyuz space capsule landed southeast of Zhezkazgan, central Kazakhstan May 14, 2013. REUTERS/Mikhail Metzel/Pool

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield gestures with a thumbs up after the Russian Soyuz space capsule landed southeast of Zhezkazgan, central Kazakhstan May 14, 2013. REUTERS/Mikhail Metzel/Pool

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Support and medical personnel carry International Space Station crew member Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA shortly after the landing of Soyuz TMA-03M capsule in a remote area near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov/Pool

Support and medical personnel carry International Space Station crew member Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA shortly after the landing of Soyuz TMA-03M capsule in a remote area near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov/Pool

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Support and medical personnel carry International Space Station crew member Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA shortly after the landing of Soyuz TMA-03M capsule near Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Mikhail Metzel/Pool

Support and medical personnel carry International Space Station crew member Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA shortly after the landing of Soyuz TMA-03M capsule near Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan July 1, 2012. REUTERS/Mikhail Metzel/Pool

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International Space Station crew member Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka signs an autograph on the Soyuz capsule after landing near Arkalyk, Kazakhstan September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

International Space Station crew member Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka signs an autograph on the Soyuz capsule after landing near Arkalyk, Kazakhstan September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

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