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Absent Chavez devalues Venezuela currency to aid government finances

Photographer
JORGE SILVA

A cashier counts notes at a supermarket in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A cashier counts notes at a supermarket in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Photographer
JORGE SILVA

People withdraw money from ATMs in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

People withdraw money from ATMs in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Photographer
Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Central Bank President Nelson Merentes attends to a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela on Friday devalued its bolivar currency in a widely expected move that will ease pressure on government finances after President Hugo Chavez's heavy campaign spending last year, but is likely to spur the OPEC nation's inflation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Central Bank President Nelson Merentes attends to a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela on Friday devalued its bolivar currency in a widely expected move that will ease pressure on government finances after President Hugo Chavez's heavy campaign spending last year, but is likely to spur the OPEC nation's inflation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Photographer
JORGE SILVA

A customer receives his change back from a cashier at a supermarket in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A customer receives his change back from a cashier at a supermarket in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Photographer
Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Finance Minister Jorge Giordani shows a document signed by President Hugo Chavez during a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Finance Minister Jorge Giordani shows a document signed by President Hugo Chavez during a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Photographer
JORGE SILVA

A woman waits before paying for her items at a supermarket in Caracas February 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A woman waits before paying for her items at a supermarket in Caracas February 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Photographer
JORGE SILVA

A man uses his mobile phone to take a picture of big samples of a "new family" of Venezuelan notes at the Central Bank headquarters in Caracas in this October 24, 2007 file photo. REUTERS/Jorge Silva/Files

A man uses his mobile phone to take a picture of big samples of a "new family" of Venezuelan notes at the Central Bank headquarters in Caracas in this October 24, 2007 file photo. REUTERS/Jorge Silva/Files
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Photographer
Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Finance Minister Jorge Giordani talks to the media during a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela on Friday devalued its bolivar currency in a widely expected move that will ease pressure on government finances after President Hugo Chavez's heavy campaign spending last year, but is likely to spur the OPEC nation's inflation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Finance Minister Jorge Giordani talks to the media during a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela on Friday devalued its bolivar currency in a widely expected move that will ease pressure on government finances after President Hugo Chavez's heavy campaign spending last year, but is likely to spur the OPEC nation's inflation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Photographer
Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Central Bank President Nelson Merentes talks to the media during a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela on Friday devalued its bolivar currency in a widely expected move that will ease pressure on government finances after President Hugo Chavez's heavy campaign spending last year, but is likely to spur the OPEC nation's inflation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela's Central Bank President Nelson Merentes talks to the media during a news conference at the headquarters of the Central Bank in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela on Friday devalued its bolivar currency in a widely expected move that will ease pressure on government finances after President Hugo Chavez's heavy campaign spending last year, but is likely to spur the OPEC nation's inflation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Photographer
JORGE SILVA

A woman leaves a supermarket after paying in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A woman leaves a supermarket after paying in Caracas February 8, 2013. Venezuela devalued its bolivar currency to 6.3 per dollar from 4.3 per dollar, the finance minister said on Friday, in a widely expected move to shore up government finances after blowout government spending last year. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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