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Pictures | Thu Mar 24, 2011 | 6:05pm EDT

An Arctic adventure

<p>Wind patterns are left in the ice pack that covers the Arctic Ocean north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Wind patterns are left in the ice pack that covers the Arctic Ocean north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 19, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Wind patterns are left in the ice pack that covers the Arctic Ocean north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 19, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>A man urinates into a box as the sun sets over Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, in this March 18, 2011 picture. Using a digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system and a simpler underwater telephone, officials from the Navy's Arctic Submarine Laboratory at the camp were able to help the USS New Hampshire submarine find a relatively ice-free spot to surface and evacuate a sailor stricken with appendicitis. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

A man urinates into a box as the sun sets over Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, in this March 18, 2011 picture. Using a digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system and a simpler...more

A man urinates into a box as the sun sets over Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, in this March 18, 2011 picture. Using a digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system and a simpler underwater telephone, officials from the Navy's Arctic Submarine Laboratory at the camp were able to help the USS New Hampshire submarine find a relatively ice-free spot to surface and evacuate a sailor stricken with appendicitis. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Fuel drums are seen on Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Fuel drums are seen on Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Fuel drums are seen on Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Workers walk towards a helicopter after delivering supplies to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Workers walk towards a helicopter after delivering supplies to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Workers walk towards a helicopter after delivering supplies to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>A participant in the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, pushes a generator towards a refueling station March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

A participant in the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, pushes a generator towards a refueling station March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

A participant in the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, pushes a generator towards a refueling station March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>An Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station employee carries a shotgun as he guards against polar bears near the Seawolf-class submarine USS Connecticut after the boat surfaced through through Arctic sea ice during an exercise north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

An Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station employee carries a shotgun as he guards against polar bears near the Seawolf-class submarine USS Connecticut after the boat surfaced through through Arctic sea ice during an exercise north of Prudhoe Bay,...more

An Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station employee carries a shotgun as he guards against polar bears near the Seawolf-class submarine USS Connecticut after the boat surfaced through through Arctic sea ice during an exercise north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>An outdoor toilet is seen on the Arctic ice at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

An outdoor toilet is seen on the Arctic ice at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An outdoor toilet is seen on the Arctic ice at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>U.S. Navy safety swimmers stand on the deck of the Virginia class submarine USS New Hampshire after it surfaced through thin ice during exercises underneath ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 19, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

U.S. Navy safety swimmers stand on the deck of the Virginia class submarine USS New Hampshire after it surfaced through thin ice during exercises underneath ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 19, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson more

U.S. Navy safety swimmers stand on the deck of the Virginia class submarine USS New Hampshire after it surfaced through thin ice during exercises underneath ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 19, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee Keith Magness (L) watches as U.S. Navy postgraduate researcher Lt. Brandon Schmidt works to prepare a hole in the Arctic ice that will allow sonar instrumentation to be used for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee Keith Magness (L) watches as U.S. Navy postgraduate researcher Lt. Brandon Schmidt works to prepare a hole in the Arctic ice that will allow sonar instrumentation to be used for research at the...more

Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee Keith Magness (L) watches as U.S. Navy postgraduate researcher Lt. Brandon Schmidt works to prepare a hole in the Arctic ice that will allow sonar instrumentation to be used for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>A helicopter moves a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

A helicopter moves a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

A helicopter moves a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Ice crystals are seen at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Ice crystals are seen at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Ice crystals are seen at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>US Navy sailor Harold Brown watches as he waits for the Seawolf class submarine USS Connecticut to surface through Arctic sea ice during an exercise near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011.  REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

US Navy sailor Harold Brown watches as he waits for the Seawolf class submarine USS Connecticut to surface through Arctic sea ice during an exercise near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. ...more

US Navy sailor Harold Brown watches as he waits for the Seawolf class submarine USS Connecticut to surface through Arctic sea ice during an exercise near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Workers use a radio to verify their position after delivering supplies to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Workers use a radio to verify their position after delivering supplies to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Workers use a radio to verify their position after delivering supplies to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>A helicopter drops off supplies at a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

A helicopter drops off supplies at a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

A helicopter drops off supplies at a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>An Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee uses a hot water dispenser to prepare a hole in the Arctic ice that will allow sonar instrumentation to be used for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. Using a new low-frequency messaging system and a simpler underwater telephone, officials from the Navy's Arctic Submarine Laboratory at the station were able to help the USS New Hampshire find a relatively ice-free spot to surface and evacuate a sailor stricken with appendicitis. The new digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system built by Raytheon Co could revolutionize how military commanders stay in touch with submarines all over the world, allowing them to alert a submarine about an enemy ship on the surface or a new mission, without it needing to surface to periscope level, or 60 feet, where it could be detected by potential enemies. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

An Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee uses a hot water dispenser to prepare a hole in the Arctic ice that will allow sonar instrumentation to be used for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18,...more

An Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee uses a hot water dispenser to prepare a hole in the Arctic ice that will allow sonar instrumentation to be used for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. Using a new low-frequency messaging system and a simpler underwater telephone, officials from the Navy's Arctic Submarine Laboratory at the station were able to help the USS New Hampshire find a relatively ice-free spot to surface and evacuate a sailor stricken with appendicitis. The new digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system built by Raytheon Co could revolutionize how military commanders stay in touch with submarines all over the world, allowing them to alert a submarine about an enemy ship on the surface or a new mission, without it needing to surface to periscope level, or 60 feet, where it could be detected by potential enemies. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>A man carries an ice auger to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011.  REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

A man carries an ice auger to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

A man carries an ice auger to a remote warming station near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Researchers stretch out a cable that will be used with their sonar equipment at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Researchers stretch out a cable that will be used with their sonar equipment at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Researchers stretch out a cable that will be used with their sonar equipment at the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>A road and the Trans Alaska Pipeline run past a mountain in northern Alaska March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

A road and the Trans Alaska Pipeline run past a mountain in northern Alaska March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

A road and the Trans Alaska Pipeline run past a mountain in northern Alaska March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee Nick Michel-Hart (L) and U.S. Navy graduate school researcher Lt. Brandon Schmidt dig a hole to hang sonar instrumentation for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee Nick Michel-Hart (L) and U.S. Navy graduate school researcher Lt. Brandon Schmidt dig a hole to hang sonar instrumentation for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March...more

Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) employee Nick Michel-Hart (L) and U.S. Navy graduate school researcher Lt. Brandon Schmidt dig a hole to hang sonar instrumentation for research at the 2011 APLIS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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<p>The moon rises over Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson </p>

The moon rises over Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

The moon rises over Arctic ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

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