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Analysis: E-readers grapple with a future on the shelf

An Amazon Kindle (L-R), a Bookeen Cybook Odyssey, and a Sony Reader, all of which use technology developed by E Ink, are pictured at E Ink Corporation in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

An Amazon Kindle (L-R), a Bookeen Cybook Odyssey, and a Sony Reader, all of which use technology developed by E Ink, are pictured at E Ink Corporation in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

An Amazon Kindle (L-R), a Bookeen Cybook Odyssey, and a Sony Reader, all of which use technology developed by E Ink, are pictured at E Ink Corporation in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
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Watches from Seiko and Phosphor as well as an Amazon Kindle, which all use technology developed by E Ink Corporation, are pictured in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Watches from Seiko and Phosphor as well as an Amazon Kindle, which all use technology developed by E Ink Corporation, are pictured in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Watches from Seiko and Phosphor as well as an Amazon Kindle, which all use technology developed by E Ink Corporation, are pictured in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
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Several products that use technology developed by E Ink Corporation are pictured in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Several products that use technology developed by E Ink Corporation are pictured in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Several products that use technology developed by E Ink Corporation are pictured in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
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A portrait of Walt Whitman is shown on the home screen of a Nook reader from Barnes & Noble, which uses technology developed by E Ink Corporation, in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

A portrait of Walt Whitman is shown on the home screen of a Nook reader from Barnes & Noble, which uses technology developed by E Ink Corporation, in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

A portrait of Walt Whitman is shown on the home screen of a Nook reader from Barnes & Noble, which uses technology developed by E Ink Corporation, in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
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Portraits of Edgar Allan Poe and Walt Whitman are shown on the home screens of Nook readers from Barnes & Noble, which use technology developed by E Ink Corporation, in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Portraits of Edgar Allan Poe and Walt Whitman are shown on the home screens of Nook readers from Barnes & Noble, which use technology developed by E Ink Corporation, in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Portraits of Edgar Allan Poe and Walt Whitman are shown on the home screens of Nook readers from Barnes & Noble, which use technology developed by E Ink Corporation, in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
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E Ink Corporation's logo is pictured in their offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. Amidst our growing love affair with the tablet, spare a thought for its increasingly shelfbound sibling: the e-reader. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

E Ink Corporation's logo is pictured in their offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. Amidst our growing love affair with the tablet, spare a thought for its increasingly shelfbound sibling: the e-reader. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

E Ink Corporation's logo is pictured in their offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 25, 2012. Amidst our growing love affair with the tablet, spare a thought for its increasingly shelfbound sibling: the e-reader. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
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