Edition:
United States
Pictures | Sun Nov 18, 2012 | 4:13pm EST

Analysis: Japan politics could fragment further on road to two-party system

Members of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan stand next to a poster of Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda after a meeting at the parliament in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put LDP leader Shinzo Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

Members of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan stand next to a poster of Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda after a meeting at the parliament in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just...more

Members of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan stand next to a poster of Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda after a meeting at the parliament in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put LDP leader Shinzo Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao
Close
1 / 6
Shinzo Abe, the head of Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party, speaks during a lecture entitled, "The path to the rejuvenation of Japan," in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao/Files

Shinzo Abe, the head of Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party, speaks during a lecture entitled, "The path to the rejuvenation of Japan," in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't...more

Shinzo Abe, the head of Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party, speaks during a lecture entitled, "The path to the rejuvenation of Japan," in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao/Files
Close
2 / 6
Shinzo Abe, former Prime Minister and head of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), smiles during a lower house plenary session at the parliament in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop LDP rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao/Files

Shinzo Abe, former Prime Minister and head of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), smiles during a lower house plenary session at the parliament in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just...more

Shinzo Abe, former Prime Minister and head of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), smiles during a lower house plenary session at the parliament in Tokyo in this November 15, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop LDP rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao/Files
Close
3 / 6
Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks at his news conference at his official residence in Tokyo in this November 16, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put LDP leader Shinzo Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Files

Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks at his news conference at his official residence in Tokyo in this November 16, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in...more

Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks at his news conference at his official residence in Tokyo in this November 16, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put LDP leader Shinzo Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Files
Close
4 / 6
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (R) and main opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) leader Shinzo Abe speak at a parliamentary debate in Tokyo, in this November 14, 2012 file combination photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Files

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (R) and main opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) leader Shinzo Abe speak at a parliamentary debate in Tokyo, in this November 14, 2012 file combination photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi...more

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (R) and main opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) leader Shinzo Abe speak at a parliamentary debate in Tokyo, in this November 14, 2012 file combination photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/Files
Close
5 / 6
Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda raises his hands next to Deputy Prime Minister Katsuya Okada as they attend the lower house budget committee meeting in Tokyo in this November 12, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put LDP leader Shinzo Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda raises his hands next to Deputy Prime Minister Katsuya Okada as they attend the lower house budget committee meeting in Tokyo in this November 12, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi...more

Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda raises his hands next to Deputy Prime Minister Katsuya Okada as they attend the lower house budget committee meeting in Tokyo in this November 12, 2012 file photo. Japan ruling party lawmaker Mieko Nakabayashi isn't just worried that her Democratic Party will lose power in next month's election; she fears a comeback by rival conservative Liberal Democrats will spell a return to the prolonged one-party rule that critics blame for many of the country's past policy ills. Three years after the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) ended more than half a century of nearly non-stop Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule, surveys suggest disappointed voters will hand the LDP the most seats in a December 16 poll for parliament's lower house. That would put LDP leader Shinzo Abe in pole position to form the next government and regain a job he quit in 2007. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao
Close
6 / 6

Next Slideshows

Week in fashion

The past week in the world of fashion.

Nov 16 2012

Objects of Sandy

Personal effects amid the ruins of Sandy.

Nov 16 2012

Outrage over Ireland's abortion rules

Protests mount over Irish abortion laws which resulted in the death of an Indian woman after she was refused a termination.

Nov 16 2012

Latin Grammy Awards

Highlights from the Latin Grammy Awards.

Nov 15 2012

MORE IN PICTURES

The sniper wars of Mosul

The sniper wars of Mosul

As an outnumbered and outgunned Islamic State defend their last stronghold in Iraq, snipers have been one of their most effective weapons.

Running of the Brides

Running of the Brides

Couples take part in the "Running of the Brides" race as they compete for wedding prizes in Bangkok.

Cherry blossoms in bloom

Cherry blossoms in bloom

The arrival of cherry blossoms heralds the beginning of spring.

Russian police detain hundreds of protesters

Russian police detain hundreds of protesters

Police detain hundreds of protesters across Russia, including opposition leader Alexei Navalny, after thousands took to the streets to demonstrate against corruption.

Clashes break out at Trump rally

Clashes break out at Trump rally

Supporters of Trump clash with counter-protesters at a rally in Huntington Beach, California.

First 100 days of Trump

First 100 days of Trump

Major moments from the first days of the Trump administration.

Republicans pull healthcare bill

Republicans pull healthcare bill

President Donald Trump suffered a stunning political setback in a Congress controlled by his own party when Republican leaders pulled legislation to overhaul Obamacare, a major 2016 election campaign promise of the president and his allies.

Sunken South Korean ferry raised

Sunken South Korean ferry raised

The Sewol ferry that sank nearly three years ago, killing 304 people, most of them children on a school trip, slowly emerges from a gray sea.

Photos of the week

Photos of the week

Our top photos of the week.

Newer Slideshows Older Slideshows

Trending Collections

Pictures