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Pictures | Wed Nov 28, 2012 | 1:11am EST

Analysis: U.S. pilots vote on deals, other airline staff agitate

Donna J. Gaspero (R), an American Airlines flight attendant for 37 years, marches with Laura Glading (C), president of the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA), during a rally to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files

Donna J. Gaspero (R), an American Airlines flight attendant for 37 years, marches with Laura Glading (C), president of the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA), during a rally to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as...more

Donna J. Gaspero (R), an American Airlines flight attendant for 37 years, marches with Laura Glading (C), president of the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA), during a rally to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files
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American Airlines flight attendants demonstrate during a rally and march to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files

American Airlines flight attendants demonstrate during a rally and march to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo....more

American Airlines flight attendants demonstrate during a rally and march to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files
Close
2 / 5
U.S. Airways Flight attendant Barbara de la Portilla yells along with other attendants as they picket at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina in this November 14, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Chris Keane/Files

U.S. Airways Flight attendant Barbara de la Portilla yells along with other attendants as they picket at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina in this November 14, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and...more

U.S. Airways Flight attendant Barbara de la Portilla yells along with other attendants as they picket at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina in this November 14, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Chris Keane/Files
Close
3 / 5
American Airlines flight attendants demonstrate during a rally to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files

American Airlines flight attendants demonstrate during a rally to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United...more

American Airlines flight attendants demonstrate during a rally to save jobs at American Airlines and American Eagle, as hearings to void labor contracts begin at U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York in this April 23, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files
Close
4 / 5
U.S. Airways Flight Attendant Carletta Farley yells slogans as she pickets with fellow attendants at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina in this November 14, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Chris Keane

U.S. Airways Flight Attendant Carletta Farley yells slogans as she pickets with fellow attendants at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina in this November 14, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American...more

U.S. Airways Flight Attendant Carletta Farley yells slogans as she pickets with fellow attendants at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina in this November 14, 2012, file photo. Pilots at United Airlines and American Airlines are due to vote in coming weeks on new labor contracts that in some cases offer the first significant raises in almost a decade. But the carriers, citing high risks that the recovery in their fortunes could stall, are not prepared to improve contracts across the board, industry experts and airline executives say. That means labor relations could remain rocky. Flight attendants for U.S. Airways Group voted overwhelmingly last week to authorize a strike, saying their latest contract offer still reflects the days when airline profits were in free-fall. To match Analysis AIRLINES-LABOR/ REUTERS/Chris Keane
Close
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