Edition:
United States
Pictures | Tue Sep 23, 2008 | 9:11pm EDT

Andean farmers yearn for Bolivia's warmer climates

<p>An indigenous Bolivian woman and her son cross farmland in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado</p>

An indigenous Bolivian woman and her son cross farmland in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the...more

An indigenous Bolivian woman and her son cross farmland in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado

Close
1 / 7
<p>A Bolivian indigenous child walks in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado</p>

A Bolivian indigenous child walks in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of...more

A Bolivian indigenous child walks in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado

Close
2 / 7
<p>A Bolivian indigenous woman and her child talk in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado</p>

A Bolivian indigenous woman and her child talk in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist...more

A Bolivian indigenous woman and her child talk in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado

Close
3 / 7
<p>Bolivian government officials (L and C, yellow cap) register indigenous Bolivians to participate in a land redistribution program in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado</p>

Bolivian government officials (L and C, yellow cap) register indigenous Bolivians to participate in a land redistribution program in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and...more

Bolivian government officials (L and C, yellow cap) register indigenous Bolivians to participate in a land redistribution program in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz, in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado

Close
4 / 7
<p>Bolivian farmer Julio Mamani (R) and his father stand inside their home during an interview with Reuters in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado</p>

Bolivian farmer Julio Mamani (R) and his father stand inside their home during an interview with Reuters in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in...more

Bolivian farmer Julio Mamani (R) and his father stand inside their home during an interview with Reuters in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado

Close
5 / 7
<p>An indigenous Bolivian farmer tills the land in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado )</p>

An indigenous Bolivian farmer tills the land in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist...more

An indigenous Bolivian farmer tills the land in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado )

Close
6 / 7
<p>An indigenous Bolivian couple queue up to register as participants in a land redistribution program in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado</p>

An indigenous Bolivian couple queue up to register as participants in a land redistribution program in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme...more

An indigenous Bolivian couple queue up to register as participants in a land redistribution program in Achacachi, some 90 km (56 miles) north of La Paz in this picture taken August 29, 2008. Hundreds of Quechua and Aymara families living in extreme poverty in the Bolivian Andes are asking the leftist government of President Evo Morales for a piece of land in the lush eastern lowlands. One of Morales' most daring reforms of all is to redistribute state land and large private ranches to the poorer Indians that form his powerbase, a measure that has set off a violent reaction in the agricultural and opposition heartland. Picture taken August 29. REUTERS/David Mercado

Close
7 / 7

Next Slideshows

Fashion on the brain

Head-turning fashion hits the runway in London and Madrid.

Sep 18 2008

Milk powder

Thousands of children have become sick after drinking contaminated milk in China.

Sep 17 2008

wine harvest

Workers pick grapes off the vines as wine harvest season begins in California's famed Napa Valley.

Sep 16 2008

Ike pounds Texas

Hurricane Ike slammed the Texas and Louisiana coast, flooding hundreds of miles and causing billions of dollars in damage.

Sep 15 2008

MORE IN PICTURES

Helping amputee animals walk again

Helping amputee animals walk again

From a miniature pony to goats, and dogs to elephants, Derrick Campana fashions prosthetics to help animals walk again.

China from above

China from above

A bird's eye view of the most populous country.

First 100 days of Trump

First 100 days of Trump

Major moments from the first days of the Trump administration.

Fighting for control of Syria's Tabqa dam

Fighting for control of Syria's Tabqa dam

Syrian engineers work to open spillways and ease pressure on a major dam across the Euphrates River, as the dam's southern reaches remain in the hands of Islamic State.

Brutal street battle for Mosul

Brutal street battle for Mosul

Iraqi forces enter Mosul's Old City as Islamic State militants put up fierce resistance from the close-packed houses and narrow streets.

Peru reels from rainy season floods

Peru reels from rainy season floods

More than 80 people have been killed and 110,000 displaced in rain-related incidents in Peru since December, as the country waits for an end to an unusually brutal rainy season.

Famine strikes South Sudan

Famine strikes South Sudan

Famine is formally declared in parts of South Sudan, which has been mired in civil war since 2013.

The sniper wars of Mosul

The sniper wars of Mosul

As an outnumbered and outgunned Islamic State defend their last stronghold in Iraq, snipers have been one of their most effective weapons.

Battleground Mosul

Battleground Mosul

The urban neighborhoods of Mosul shows the devastation of the battle to retake the Iraqi city from Islamic State control.

Newer Slideshows Older Slideshows

Trending Collections

Pictures