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Arab Spring beacon Tunisia signs new constitution

Photographer
ZOUBEIR SOUISSI

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki holds a copy of the country's new constitution after signing it in Tunis January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly on Monday signed the country's new constitution, officially adopting a charter that is one of the country's last steps to full democracy after a 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki holds a copy of the country's new constitution after signing it in Tunis January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly on Monday signed the country's new constitution, officially adopting a charter that is one of the country's last steps to full democracy after a 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi
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Photographer
ANIS MILI

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki (bottom) gives a speech in Tunis, January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly signed Tunisia's new constitution on Monday, enshrining one of its last steps toward full democracy after a 2011 uprising that inspired the Arab Spring. Pictured (top L-R) are: Tunisia's President of the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (NCA) Mustapha Ben Jaafar and outgoing Islamist Prime...more

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki (bottom) gives a speech in Tunis, January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly signed Tunisia's new constitution on Monday, enshrining one of its last steps toward full democracy after a 2011 uprising that inspired the Arab Spring. Pictured (top L-R) are: Tunisia's President of the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (NCA) Mustapha Ben Jaafar and outgoing Islamist Prime Minister Ali Larayedh. REUTERS/Anis Mili
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Photographer
ANIS MILI

Tunisia's National Assembly President Mustapha Ben Jaafar (L), President Moncef Marzouki (C) and Prime Minister Ali Larayedh (R) pose after signing the country's new constitution in Tunis January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly on Monday signed Tunisia's new constitution, officially adopting a charter that is one of the country's last steps to full democracy after a 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Anis Mili

Tunisia's National Assembly President Mustapha Ben Jaafar (L), President Moncef Marzouki (C) and Prime Minister Ali Larayedh (R) pose after signing the country's new constitution in Tunis January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly on Monday signed Tunisia's new constitution, officially adopting a charter that is one of the country's last steps to full democracy after a 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Anis Mili
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Photographer
� Zoubeir Souissi / Reuters

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki (L) shakes hands with Tunisia's Prime Minister-designate Mehdi Jomaa after Jomaa spoke during a news conference in Tunis January 26, 2014. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki (L) shakes hands with Tunisia's Prime Minister-designate Mehdi Jomaa after Jomaa spoke during a news conference in Tunis January 26, 2014. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi
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