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Pictures | Wed Apr 23, 2014 | 1:55pm EDT

Born free in South Africa

<p>Khulasande Matabese, 18, prepares to register for elections scheduled for May 7, at a friend's home in Langa township, Cape Town February 8, 2014. He said: "It is important for us as young people to go and vote for political parties the give us something to do, they should all create jobs and educational opportunities. If we all are positive, as I am, combined we can make a difference." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings</p>

Khulasande Matabese, 18, prepares to register for elections scheduled for May 7, at a friend's home in Langa township, Cape Town February 8, 2014. He said: "It is important for us as young people to go and vote for political parties the give us...more

Khulasande Matabese, 18, prepares to register for elections scheduled for May 7, at a friend's home in Langa township, Cape Town February 8, 2014. He said: "It is important for us as young people to go and vote for political parties the give us something to do, they should all create jobs and educational opportunities. If we all are positive, as I am, combined we can make a difference." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

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<p>Potential first-time voter Sandile Mabizela, 21, looks through the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Sandile said: "I don't see any importance in voting, the main people who are ruling this country are doing their own stuff. Like spending millions on just building a house. I don't see why I should vote on this thing honestly." April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalized oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

Potential first-time voter Sandile Mabizela, 21, looks through the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Sandile said: "I don't see any importance in voting, the main people who are ruling this country are doing their own...more

Potential first-time voter Sandile Mabizela, 21, looks through the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Sandile said: "I don't see any importance in voting, the main people who are ruling this country are doing their own stuff. Like spending millions on just building a house. I don't see why I should vote on this thing honestly." April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalized oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>First-time voter Thandi Mamacos, 18, sits in the lounge of her shared apartment in Cape Town April 19, 2014. Thandi said that it is "definitely important for young people to vote because they are the ones who will have to live with the outcome the longest. It's more our country than the older generation who may not want to change things that need to be changed because of what has happened in the past." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings</p>

First-time voter Thandi Mamacos, 18, sits in the lounge of her shared apartment in Cape Town April 19, 2014. Thandi said that it is "definitely important for young people to vote because they are the ones who will have to live with the outcome the...more

First-time voter Thandi Mamacos, 18, sits in the lounge of her shared apartment in Cape Town April 19, 2014. Thandi said that it is "definitely important for young people to vote because they are the ones who will have to live with the outcome the longest. It's more our country than the older generation who may not want to change things that need to be changed because of what has happened in the past." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

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<p>Mark Naidoo, 19, stands outside his parents' home in Chatsworth near Durban April 10, 2014. Mark said: "I don't believe my vote will make a difference. My parents went through apartheid and I didn't. They know about these things and know what will change." REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

Mark Naidoo, 19, stands outside his parents' home in Chatsworth near Durban April 10, 2014. Mark said: "I don't believe my vote will make a difference. My parents went through apartheid and I didn't. They know about these things and know what will...more

Mark Naidoo, 19, stands outside his parents' home in Chatsworth near Durban April 10, 2014. Mark said: "I don't believe my vote will make a difference. My parents went through apartheid and I didn't. They know about these things and know what will change." REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>First-time voter Sanele Gasa, 19, sits in the living room of his home in Inanda near Durban April 10, 2014. Sanele said: "I don't see, to be honest, the importance of voting. It seems like when you vote and when you don't vote it's all the same. Because I know people who have voted for years and nothing has changed for them. Like my Dad, he still lives in a mud house. He was born in 1961 and he is still living in a mud house. He has been registered for plenty time for the RDP houses in the local community. There's no change. His house can fall on him during the night, no-one knows when it's raining hard. But I did register for voting. This is my first time voting, because I am a born free, I was born in 1994. It will be hard and I'll be honest for me to choose a party." REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

First-time voter Sanele Gasa, 19, sits in the living room of his home in Inanda near Durban April 10, 2014. Sanele said: "I don't see, to be honest, the importance of voting. It seems like when you vote and when you don't vote it's all the same....more

First-time voter Sanele Gasa, 19, sits in the living room of his home in Inanda near Durban April 10, 2014. Sanele said: "I don't see, to be honest, the importance of voting. It seems like when you vote and when you don't vote it's all the same. Because I know people who have voted for years and nothing has changed for them. Like my Dad, he still lives in a mud house. He was born in 1961 and he is still living in a mud house. He has been registered for plenty time for the RDP houses in the local community. There's no change. His house can fall on him during the night, no-one knows when it's raining hard. But I did register for voting. This is my first time voting, because I am a born free, I was born in 1994. It will be hard and I'll be honest for me to choose a party." REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>First-time voter Rethabile Moso, 19, stands outside her home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Rethabile said: "Most of the youth are smoking tik (crystal meth) and drugs. They take the wrong things, drink, commit robbery. I want the political party that will lead to take care of that situation. I think my vote can make a difference." REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

First-time voter Rethabile Moso, 19, stands outside her home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Rethabile said: "Most of the youth are smoking tik (crystal meth) and drugs. They take the wrong things, drink, commit robbery. I want the...more

First-time voter Rethabile Moso, 19, stands outside her home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Rethabile said: "Most of the youth are smoking tik (crystal meth) and drugs. They take the wrong things, drink, commit robbery. I want the political party that will lead to take care of that situation. I think my vote can make a difference." REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>First-time voter Mphakamisi Zali, 18, stands in the kitchen of his mother's home in Cape Town's Langa township, February 8, 2014. Mphakamisi said: "The born frees can make their voices count. We need parties to concentrate on education and creating more internships and job opportunities for young people." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings</p>

First-time voter Mphakamisi Zali, 18, stands in the kitchen of his mother's home in Cape Town's Langa township, February 8, 2014. Mphakamisi said: "The born frees can make their voices count. We need parties to concentrate on education and creating...more

First-time voter Mphakamisi Zali, 18, stands in the kitchen of his mother's home in Cape Town's Langa township, February 8, 2014. Mphakamisi said: "The born frees can make their voices count. We need parties to concentrate on education and creating more internships and job opportunities for young people." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

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<p>Youth worker Nathaniel Groep, 19, stands in front of flats outside his home in Mannenberg, a gang-ravaged township, in Cape Town April 18, 2014. Nathaniel said: "Every vote counts, particularly for young people. For our generation there are new possibilities and maybe we can build a brighter future. The issues I would like to see addressed are gangsterism, peer pressure and the lack of work opportunities." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings</p>

Youth worker Nathaniel Groep, 19, stands in front of flats outside his home in Mannenberg, a gang-ravaged township, in Cape Town April 18, 2014. Nathaniel said: "Every vote counts, particularly for young people. For our generation there are new...more

Youth worker Nathaniel Groep, 19, stands in front of flats outside his home in Mannenberg, a gang-ravaged township, in Cape Town April 18, 2014. Nathaniel said: "Every vote counts, particularly for young people. For our generation there are new possibilities and maybe we can build a brighter future. The issues I would like to see addressed are gangsterism, peer pressure and the lack of work opportunities." REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

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<p>Potential first-time voter Luyanda Malinga, 20, stands outside her home in Marianhill, near Durban April 10, 2014. Luyanda said: "I am not voting. I don't see there's a need for me to vote because there is nothing that has changed ever since people started to voting." She added, "The main issue for me is education. I finished grade 12 in 2011. Ever since I did not receive any bursaries, nothing. I couldn't go to varsity at all yet I had passed very well. In those political parties you have to be involved in their stuff, you have to be a youth member to get all these things." REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

Potential first-time voter Luyanda Malinga, 20, stands outside her home in Marianhill, near Durban April 10, 2014. Luyanda said: "I am not voting. I don't see there's a need for me to vote because there is nothing that has changed ever since people...more

Potential first-time voter Luyanda Malinga, 20, stands outside her home in Marianhill, near Durban April 10, 2014. Luyanda said: "I am not voting. I don't see there's a need for me to vote because there is nothing that has changed ever since people started to voting." She added, "The main issue for me is education. I finished grade 12 in 2011. Ever since I did not receive any bursaries, nothing. I couldn't go to varsity at all yet I had passed very well. In those political parties you have to be involved in their stuff, you have to be a youth member to get all these things." REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>First-time voter Shaniel Naidoo, 20, stands outside his home in Northdale, near Pietermaritzburg April 16, 2014. Shaniel said: "When the young people are voting now it's because they want the South Africa to change, to be a better South Africa. They want things to go in the right way, especially with the youngster's education. Most of the youngsters finishing school now are still without jobs. So that's one thing the political parties need to turn around, to create more jobs in South Africa." REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

First-time voter Shaniel Naidoo, 20, stands outside his home in Northdale, near Pietermaritzburg April 16, 2014. Shaniel said: "When the young people are voting now it's because they want the South Africa to change, to be a better South Africa. They...more

First-time voter Shaniel Naidoo, 20, stands outside his home in Northdale, near Pietermaritzburg April 16, 2014. Shaniel said: "When the young people are voting now it's because they want the South Africa to change, to be a better South Africa. They want things to go in the right way, especially with the youngster's education. Most of the youngsters finishing school now are still without jobs. So that's one thing the political parties need to turn around, to create more jobs in South Africa." REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>First-time voter Sanele Chileze looks though the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban, April 10, 2014. "We have to secure the legacy of Mandela," Sanele said. "That's why it is very important for us to vote, for this nation to be straight and everyone can be free. If I don't vote I can't say anything, if I vote I can say something." REUTERS/Rogan Ward</p>

First-time voter Sanele Chileze looks though the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban, April 10, 2014. "We have to secure the legacy of Mandela," Sanele said. "That's why it is very important for us to vote, for this nation to be...more

First-time voter Sanele Chileze looks though the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban, April 10, 2014. "We have to secure the legacy of Mandela," Sanele said. "That's why it is very important for us to vote, for this nation to be straight and everyone can be free. If I don't vote I can't say anything, if I vote I can say something." REUTERS/Rogan Ward

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<p>Second-year civil engineering student and first-time voter Nkululeko Simelane poses for a picture at Wits University in Johannesburg, April 22, 2014. Nkululeko said: "For me voting for the first time... I don't want to lie I don't have the energy. The only thing that is pushing me to vote is that it is for the first time I don't want to miss it." REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko</p>

Second-year civil engineering student and first-time voter Nkululeko Simelane poses for a picture at Wits University in Johannesburg, April 22, 2014. Nkululeko said: "For me voting for the first time... I don't want to lie I don't have the energy....more

Second-year civil engineering student and first-time voter Nkululeko Simelane poses for a picture at Wits University in Johannesburg, April 22, 2014. Nkululeko said: "For me voting for the first time... I don't want to lie I don't have the energy. The only thing that is pushing me to vote is that it is for the first time I don't want to miss it." REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

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