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Britain's Cameron rejects press law after hacking scandal

Photographer
POOL

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, flanked by Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg (L), Culture Secretary Maria Miller (2ndR) and Business Secretary Vince Cable (R), speaks about Lord Justice Brian Leveson's report on media practices in Parliament in this still image taken from video in London November 29, 2012. REUTERS/UK Parliament/Pool

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, flanked by Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg (L), Culture Secretary Maria Miller (2ndR) and Business Secretary Vince Cable (R), speaks about Lord Justice Brian Leveson's report on media practices in Parliament in this still image taken from video in London November 29, 2012. REUTERS/UK Parliament/Pool
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Photographer
PAUL HACKETT

Lord Justice Brian Leveson poses with an executive summary of his report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Lord Justice Brian Leveson poses with an executive summary of his report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
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Photographer
POOL

Lord Justice Brian Leveson unveils his report following an inquiry into media practices at the QE2 Centre in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Dan Kitwood

Lord Justice Brian Leveson unveils his report following an inquiry into media practices at the QE2 Centre in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Dan Kitwood
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Photographer
PAUL HACKETT

Lord Justice Brian Leveson poses with an executive summary of his report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Lord Justice Brian Leveson poses with an executive summary of his report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
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Photographer
CARLO ALLEGRI

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch leaves his Fifth Avenue home in New York, November 29, 2012. The Leveson report, which is due out today, was ordered by Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron following public outrage at Murdoch's now defunct News of the World tabloid. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch leaves his Fifth Avenue home in New York, November 29, 2012. The Leveson report, which is due out today, was ordered by Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron following public outrage at Murdoch's now defunct News of the World tabloid. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
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Photographer
CARLO ALLEGRI

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch leaves his Fifth Avenue home in New York, November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch leaves his Fifth Avenue home in New York, November 29, 2012. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
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Photographer
PAUL HACKETT

Lord Justice Leveson (R) poses for photographs with his report into the culture, practice and ethics of the press in London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Lord Justice Leveson (R) poses for photographs with his report into the culture, practice and ethics of the press in London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
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Photographer
PAUL HACKETT

Photographers take pictures of executive summaries of Lord Justice Brian Leveson's report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Photographers take pictures of executive summaries of Lord Justice Brian Leveson's report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
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Photographer
PAUL HACKETT

Lord Justice Brian Leveson's executive summary of his report following an inquiry into media practices is seen in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Lord Justice Brian Leveson's executive summary of his report following an inquiry into media practices is seen in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
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Photographer
PAUL HACKETT

Photographers take pictures of executive summaries of Lord Justice Brian Leveson's report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Photographers take pictures of executive summaries of Lord Justice Brian Leveson's report following an inquiry into media practices in central London November 29, 2012. Prime Minister David Cameron faces a no-win dilemma on Thursday when a far-reaching inquiry into British newspapers delivers its verdict on how to curb the excesses of the country's notoriously aggressive press. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
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