Thomson Reuters

Broken lives of Fukushima

Share Slideshow

Traditional shoes are left in an abandoned civic center at the tsunami-destroyed coastal area of the evacuated town of Namie in Fukushima prefecture September 15, 2013. Namie's more than 20,000 former residents can visit their homes once a month with special permissions but are not allowed to stay overnight inside the exclusion zone. A total of 160,000 people were ordered to leave their homes around crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant...more

Traditional shoes are left in an abandoned civic center at the tsunami-destroyed coastal area of the evacuated town of Namie in Fukushima prefecture September 15, 2013. Namie's more than 20,000 former residents can visit their homes once a month with special permissions but are not allowed to stay overnight inside the exclusion zone. A total of 160,000 people were ordered to leave their homes around crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant following the nuclear disaster in March 2011. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
1 / 30

Waves break into the anti-tsunami barriers as a typhoon hits the area near the town of Iwaki September 16, 2013. Almost all the beaches in Fukushima prefectures remain closed. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Waves break into the anti-tsunami barriers as a typhoon hits the area near the town of Iwaki September 16, 2013. Almost all the beaches in Fukushima prefectures remain closed. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
2 / 30

A man walks among temporary housing structures erected for workers at J-Village, a soccer training complex now serving as an operation base for those battling Japan's nuclear disaster September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A man walks among temporary housing structures erected for workers at J-Village, a soccer training complex now serving as an operation base for those battling Japan's nuclear disaster September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
3 / 30

Mieko Okubo, 59, poses with a portrait of her father-in-law Fumio Okubo next to his jacket in his room where he committed suicide in the town of Iitate September 18, 2013. Fumio, a 102-year-old farmer hanged himself in the house he lived in all his life after authorities ordered evacuation from the area following the nuclear disaster. Mieko, who lives outside the exclusion zone, comes back every other day to feed Fumio's dog and...more

Mieko Okubo, 59, poses with a portrait of her father-in-law Fumio Okubo next to his jacket in his room where he committed suicide in the town of Iitate September 18, 2013. Fumio, a 102-year-old farmer hanged himself in the house he lived in all his life after authorities ordered evacuation from the area following the nuclear disaster. Mieko, who lives outside the exclusion zone, comes back every other day to feed Fumio's dog and clean the house. She said Fumio committed suicide because he just could not stand to end his life somewhere else. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
4 / 30

Street lamps light the street in the evacuated town of Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Street lamps light the street in the evacuated town of Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
5 / 30
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

Keigo Sakamoto, 58, holds Atom, one of his 21 dogs and over 500 animals he keeps at his home in the exclusion zone near Naraha September 17, 2013. Sakamoto, a former caregiver and farmer who refused to leave the exclusion zone around the crippled Daiichi nuclear power plant decided to name his dog Atom because it was born just before the 2011 tsunami and nuclear disaster. With donations and support from outside Fukushima, Sakamoto...more

Keigo Sakamoto, 58, holds Atom, one of his 21 dogs and over 500 animals he keeps at his home in the exclusion zone near Naraha September 17, 2013. Sakamoto, a former caregiver and farmer who refused to leave the exclusion zone around the crippled Daiichi nuclear power plant decided to name his dog Atom because it was born just before the 2011 tsunami and nuclear disaster. With donations and support from outside Fukushima, Sakamoto lives with his animals of which many were abandoned by previous owners as they left the exclusion zone. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
6 / 30

A doctor conducts a thyroid examination on four-year-old Maria Sakamoto, brought by her mother to the office of Iwaki Radiation Citizen Centre NPO, in Iwaki town September 18, 2013. The non-profit organization offers free thyroid examination for children from Fukushima area. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A doctor conducts a thyroid examination on four-year-old Maria Sakamoto, brought by her mother to the office of Iwaki Radiation Citizen Centre NPO, in Iwaki town September 18, 2013. The non-profit organization offers free thyroid examination for children from Fukushima area. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
7 / 30

Messages of support are written on a blackboard in a science class of primary school in Namie September 22, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Messages of support are written on a blackboard in a science class of primary school in Namie September 22, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
8 / 30

Balls are seen inside damaged primary school in Namie September 22, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Balls are seen inside damaged primary school in Namie September 22, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
9 / 30

A vending machine, brought inland by a tsunami, is seen in an abandoned rice field near Minamisoma September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A vending machine, brought inland by a tsunami, is seen in an abandoned rice field near Minamisoma September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
10 / 30
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

A Buddhist monk wears a Geiger counter as he leads a small funeral ceremony for Yotsuno Kanno, who died as an evacuee at a cemetery in the evacuated town of Minamitsushima September 21, 2013. Kanno, who was evacuated after the disaster in 2011 with rest of the people from Minamitsushima, died in temporary accommodation in May this year, two weeks short of her 100th birthday. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A Buddhist monk wears a Geiger counter as he leads a small funeral ceremony for Yotsuno Kanno, who died as an evacuee at a cemetery in the evacuated town of Minamitsushima September 21, 2013. Kanno, who was evacuated after the disaster in 2011 with rest of the people from Minamitsushima, died in temporary accommodation in May this year, two weeks short of her 100th birthday. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
11 / 30

Fishermen from the "Kiyomaru" fishing boat pull in their net as they sail off Iwaki September 20, 2013. Only a small part of boat's catch will be used to test for radioactive contamination in the waters near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility, while the rest will be thrown back into the ocean. Commercial fishing has been banned near the nuclear complex since March 2011. The only fishing that still takes place is for...more

Fishermen from the "Kiyomaru" fishing boat pull in their net as they sail off Iwaki September 20, 2013. Only a small part of boat's catch will be used to test for radioactive contamination in the waters near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility, while the rest will be thrown back into the ocean. Commercial fishing has been banned near the nuclear complex since March 2011. The only fishing that still takes place is for contamination research, and is carried out by small-scale fishermen contracted by the government. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
12 / 30

Copies of Fukushima Minpo newspapers with headlines "M(agnitude) 8.8, largest in the country" and dated a day after the devastating 2011 earthquake are seen inside the office in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Copies of Fukushima Minpo newspapers with headlines "M(agnitude) 8.8, largest in the country" and dated a day after the devastating 2011 earthquake are seen inside the office in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
13 / 30

A table is set for customers at a restaurant in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A table is set for customers at a restaurant in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
14 / 30

People from the town of Tomioka share a light moment at the center for evacuees where they live in Iwaki September 19, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

People from the town of Tomioka share a light moment at the center for evacuees where they live in Iwaki September 19, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
15 / 30
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

A red light is seen in front of damaged house in Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A red light is seen in front of damaged house in Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
16 / 30

Naoto Matsumura, 53, poses for pictures in the empty street of Tomioka September 17, 2013. Despite government orders, Matsumura never left and now lives alone inside the nuclear exclusion zone with his 50 cows, two cats, a dog, a pony horse and two ostriches after the disaster forced about 160,000 people to flee their homes. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Naoto Matsumura, 53, poses for pictures in the empty street of Tomioka September 17, 2013. Despite government orders, Matsumura never left and now lives alone inside the nuclear exclusion zone with his 50 cows, two cats, a dog, a pony horse and two ostriches after the disaster forced about 160,000 people to flee their homes. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
17 / 30

Hiroshi Masakura from the town of Tomioka sits inside his pre-fabricated house at the center for evacuees where he lives in Iwaki September 20, 2013. Hiroshi's wife died from illness he considers related to depression she suffered from while living at the center for evacuees. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Hiroshi Masakura from the town of Tomioka sits inside his pre-fabricated house at the center for evacuees where he lives in Iwaki September 20, 2013. Hiroshi's wife died from illness he considers related to depression she suffered from while living at the center for evacuees. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
18 / 30

Noboru (L) and Nagako Harada stand among their cows in Namie September 14, 2013. The couple travels everyday back to Namie to take care of their 30 cows even if they no longer can be sold to a market due to their exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation. Before the disaster they had eight cows but the number grew to 30. "Cows are my family. I don't want to kill them, I don't know what to do", said Norobu. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj more

Noboru (L) and Nagako Harada stand among their cows in Namie September 14, 2013. The couple travels everyday back to Namie to take care of their 30 cows even if they no longer can be sold to a market due to their exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation. Before the disaster they had eight cows but the number grew to 30. "Cows are my family. I don't want to kill them, I don't know what to do", said Norobu. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
19 / 30

A road through a field is seen from inside an abandoned house in Namie September 15, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A road through a field is seen from inside an abandoned house in Namie September 15, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
20 / 30
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

Bicycles are left behind near the train station in Futaba September 22, 2013. Decades ago, the citizens of Futaba took such pride in hosting part of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex that they built a sign over a promenade proclaiming that atomic power made their town prosperous. Now, they are scattered around Japan with no clear sign of when they might return to their homes. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Bicycles are left behind near the train station in Futaba September 22, 2013. Decades ago, the citizens of Futaba took such pride in hosting part of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex that they built a sign over a promenade proclaiming that atomic power made their town prosperous. Now, they are scattered around Japan with no clear sign of when they might return to their homes. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
21 / 30

A clock shows the time of March 11, 2011 at the kitchen of a damaged house in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A clock shows the time of March 11, 2011 at the kitchen of a damaged house in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
22 / 30

Big plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation are dumped at a tennis court at a sports park in Naraha September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Big plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation are dumped at a tennis court at a sports park in Naraha September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
23 / 30

An elderly woman leans against the damaged grave of her relative as she visits the cemetery in Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

An elderly woman leans against the damaged grave of her relative as she visits the cemetery in Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
24 / 30

A calendar shows March 11 inside a sweet shop as owners visit it in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A calendar shows March 11 inside a sweet shop as owners visit it in Namie September 14, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
25 / 30
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

Kenichi Sato, 35, holds a football that he kept from his high school days at his abandoned home during a visit back to Namie September 14, 2013. Sato is afraid the ball is contaminated with radiation and will leave it in his home that he visits with special permission once a month. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Kenichi Sato, 35, holds a football that he kept from his high school days at his abandoned home during a visit back to Namie September 14, 2013. Sato is afraid the ball is contaminated with radiation and will leave it in his home that he visits with special permission once a month. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
26 / 30

A fishing boat is seen on a field from inside an abandoned house in Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A fishing boat is seen on a field from inside an abandoned house in Namie September 23, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
27 / 30

Kasumi Saino, from the town of Tomioka, walks her dog May between pre-fabricated houses of center for evacuees, where she lives in Iwaki September 19, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Kasumi Saino, from the town of Tomioka, walks her dog May between pre-fabricated houses of center for evacuees, where she lives in Iwaki September 19, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
28 / 30

A damaged statue of Buddha is left in the grass near Minamisoma September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A damaged statue of Buddha is left in the grass near Minamisoma September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
29 / 30

A security barrier blocks the road from Route 6 into the exclusion zone near Tomioka September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A security barrier blocks the road from Route 6 into the exclusion zone near Tomioka September 21, 2013. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
30 / 30
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

All Collections

Capturing Boko Haram

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

Photos of the week

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

Leonard Nimoy: 1931 - 2015

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

Milan Fashion Week

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

Pushing out Islamic State

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

The Bush dynasty

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

Westerners fight Islamic State

Friday, February 27, 2015

All Collections

Jihadi John uncovered

Thursday, February 26, 2015