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Canada put "wrong" maple leaf on new Canadian dollar 20 bill: expert

Photographer
CHRIS WATT

The new Canadian 20 dollar bill made of polymer is displayed at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa in this May 2, 2012, file photo. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the difference between the maple leaf on the new $20, $50 and $100 bills and...more

The new Canadian 20 dollar bill made of polymer is displayed at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa in this May 2, 2012, file photo. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the difference between the maple leaf on the new $20, $50 and $100 bills and the sugar maple that is endemic to North America. REUTERS/Chris Wattie/Files
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Photographer
MARK BLINCH

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of Canada and chairman of the Financial Stability Board, walks past a replication of the new Canadian 100 dollar bill made of polymer in Toronto November 14, 2011. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the...more

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of Canada and chairman of the Financial Stability Board, walks past a replication of the new Canadian 100 dollar bill made of polymer in Toronto November 14, 2011. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the difference between the maple leaf on the new $20, $50 and $100 bills and the sugar maple that is endemic to North America. REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files
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Photographer
MATHIEU BELANGER

Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney holds the new Canadian 50 dollar bill, made of polymer, in front of the CCGS Amundsen, the Arctic research vessel depicted on the back of the new bill, in Quebec City, in this March 26, 2012, file photo. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The...more

Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney holds the new Canadian 50 dollar bill, made of polymer, in front of the CCGS Amundsen, the Arctic research vessel depicted on the back of the new bill, in Quebec City, in this March 26, 2012, file photo. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the difference between the maple leaf on the new $20, $50 and $100 bills and the sugar maple that is endemic to North America. REUTERS/Mathieu Belanger/Files
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Photographer
JIM YOUNG

A Canadian flag is seen painted on a scull oar during the women's lightweight double sculls heat at Eton Dorney during the London 2012 Olympic Games July 29, 2012. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the difference between the maple leaf on...more

A Canadian flag is seen painted on a scull oar during the women's lightweight double sculls heat at Eton Dorney during the London 2012 Olympic Games July 29, 2012. Canada is known for the sugar maple, emblazoned on its red-and-white flag, but the Bank of Canada has put what one careful botanist says is a foreign Norway maple leaf on its new currency. The untrained eye might not at first spot the difference between the maple leaf on the new $20, $50 and $100 bills and the sugar maple that is endemic to North America. REUTERS/Jim Young/Files
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