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Pictures | Tue Mar 2, 2010 | 3:10pm EST

CeBIT technology fair

<p>People visit the stand of U.S. firm IBM at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

People visit the stand of U.S. firm IBM at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

People visit the stand of U.S. firm IBM at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>A visitor plays a computer game at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A visitor plays a computer game at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A visitor plays a computer game at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>A man demonstrates a pair of sunglasses with in-built camera at Taide Electronics stand at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A man demonstrates a pair of sunglasses with in-built camera at Taide Electronics stand at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A man demonstrates a pair of sunglasses with in-built camera at Taide Electronics stand at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>A man stands in the empty lobby hall of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.  REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A man stands in the empty lobby hall of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A man stands in the empty lobby hall of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>People run an overclocking show, running a processor faster than at its normal speed, at the stand of computer maker Asus at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.  REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

People run an overclocking show, running a processor faster than at its normal speed, at the stand of computer maker Asus at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

People run an overclocking show, running a processor faster than at its normal speed, at the stand of computer maker Asus at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Visitors walk past painted cars with mounted cameras used for Google street view at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.      REUTERS/Christian Charisius </p>

Visitors walk past painted cars with mounted cameras used for Google street view at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Christian Charisius

Visitors walk past painted cars with mounted cameras used for Google street view at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Christian Charisius

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<p>People watch an artificial waterfall at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.     REUTERS/Christian Charisius </p>

People watch an artificial waterfall at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Christian Charisius

People watch an artificial waterfall at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Christian Charisius

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<p>A man uses a touch-screen laptop at the stand of computer maker Asus at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.  REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A man uses a touch-screen laptop at the stand of computer maker Asus at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A man uses a touch-screen laptop at the stand of computer maker Asus at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Visitors wear 3D glasses as they watch a presentation at the Deutsche Telekom stand on the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.    REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch </p>

Visitors wear 3D glasses as they watch a presentation at the Deutsche Telekom stand on the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Visitors wear 3D glasses as they watch a presentation at the Deutsche Telekom stand on the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

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<p>A Continental staff poses for the media as he points to the touchscreen of a new voice controlled multimedia navigation system at the Deutsche Telekom stand on the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010.       REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch </p>

A Continental staff poses for the media as he points to the touchscreen of a new voice controlled multimedia navigation system at the Deutsche Telekom stand on the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

A Continental staff poses for the media as he points to the touchscreen of a new voice controlled multimedia navigation system at the Deutsche Telekom stand on the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

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<p>An overview shows the stands at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 27, 2010.   REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

An overview shows the stands at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 27, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

An overview shows the stands at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 27, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Girls use a touch screen table in a digital classroom at the Microsoft stand at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Girls use a touch screen table in a digital classroom at the Microsoft stand at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Girls use a touch screen table in a digital classroom at the Microsoft stand at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>A man cleans a keyboard at the stand of VSO Technology at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010.       REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch </p>

A man cleans a keyboard at the stand of VSO Technology at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

A man cleans a keyboard at the stand of VSO Technology at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

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<p>A woman puts Zotac motherboards on display at the CeBIT fair in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A woman puts Zotac motherboards on display at the CeBIT fair in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A woman puts Zotac motherboards on display at the CeBIT fair in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Journalists watch a presentation of the new electronic identity card for German citizens at the CeBIT fair in Hannover February 28, 2010. The credit card-sized identity card will contain a radio-frequency (RFID) chip and will be introduced, initially on a voluntary basis, on November 1, 2010.  Besides its traditional function as a proof of identity, the card will serve as a means of age verification for online services and an electronic signature for digital documents. The information on the chip will be secured by a personal pin.    REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

Journalists watch a presentation of the new electronic identity card for German citizens at the CeBIT fair in Hannover February 28, 2010. The credit card-sized identity card will contain a radio-frequency (RFID) chip and will be introduced, initially...more

Journalists watch a presentation of the new electronic identity card for German citizens at the CeBIT fair in Hannover February 28, 2010. The credit card-sized identity card will contain a radio-frequency (RFID) chip and will be introduced, initially on a voluntary basis, on November 1, 2010. Besides its traditional function as a proof of identity, the card will serve as a means of age verification for online services and an electronic signature for digital documents. The information on the chip will be secured by a personal pin. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>A woman places webcams at the stand of the Hong Kong based company Taide electronics at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010.  REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch </p>

A woman places webcams at the stand of the Hong Kong based company Taide electronics at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

A woman places webcams at the stand of the Hong Kong based company Taide electronics at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

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<p>Pupils of Berlin's Hausburg European school use laptops with a new children-friendly Microsoft software at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010.       REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch </p>

Pupils of Berlin's Hausburg European school use laptops with a new children-friendly Microsoft software at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Pupils of Berlin's Hausburg European school use laptops with a new children-friendly Microsoft software at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

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<p>Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Bettina Wulff and Lower Saxony's state Prime Minister Christian Wulff (L-R) wear 3D glasses during the opening ceremony of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch </p>

Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Bettina Wulff and Lower Saxony's state Prime Minister Christian Wulff (L-R) wear 3D glasses during the opening ceremony of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March...more

Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Bettina Wulff and Lower Saxony's state Prime Minister Christian Wulff (L-R) wear 3D glasses during the opening ceremony of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

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<p>Men use computers in server cabinets at the stand of the industrial enclosures manufacturer Rittal at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010.    REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Men use computers in server cabinets at the stand of the industrial enclosures manufacturer Rittal at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Men use computers in server cabinets at the stand of the industrial enclosures manufacturer Rittal at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hanover March 1, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>A touch screen computer is seen in a digital classroom at the Microsoft stand at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 28, 2010.  REUTERS/Thomas Peter </p>

A touch screen computer is seen in a digital classroom at the Microsoft stand at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A touch screen computer is seen in a digital classroom at the Microsoft stand at the CeBIT exhibition centre in Hannover February 28, 2010. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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