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China Nobel winner Mo Yan calls for jailed laureate's freedom

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JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan gestures during a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan said on Friday that he hoped the jailed 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, can "achieve freedom soon". REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan gestures during a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan said on Friday that he hoped the jailed 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, can "achieve freedom soon". REUTERS/Jason Lee
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JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan arrives for a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Mo won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on Thursday for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan arrives for a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Mo won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on Thursday for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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Photographer
JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan takes a lift down after a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan said on Friday he hoped jailed compatriot Liu Xiaobo, who won the Nobel Peace Prize two years ago, would be freed soon. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan takes a lift down after a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan said on Friday he hoped jailed compatriot Liu Xiaobo, who won the Nobel Peace Prize two years ago, would be freed soon. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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Photographer
JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan gestures before the start of a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan said on Friday that he hoped the jailed 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, can "achieve freedom soon". REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan gestures before the start of a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo Yan said on Friday that he hoped the jailed 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, can "achieve freedom soon". REUTERS/Jason Lee
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Photographer
JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan speaks to members of the media during a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo said on Friday that he hoped the jailed 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, can "achieve freedom soon". REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan speaks to members of the media during a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Chinese Nobel Literature Prize winner Mo said on Friday that he hoped the jailed 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, can "achieve freedom soon". REUTERS/Jason Lee
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Photographer
JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan waits for the starts of a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Mo won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on Thursday for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan waits for the starts of a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Mo won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on Thursday for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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Photographer
JASON LEE

Chinese writer Mo Yan arrives for a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Mo won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on Thursday for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese writer Mo Yan arrives for a news conference in his hometown of Gaomi, Shandong province October 12, 2012. Mo won the 2012 Nobel prize for literature on Thursday for works which combine "hallucinatory realism" with folk tales, history and contemporary life in China. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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