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Pictures | Mon Sep 9, 2013 | 10:45am EDT

Conflict over ancestral lands

<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indians live in a makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 8, 2013. The Guarani tribe is immersed in a bloody conflict with farmers over possession of their ancestral land that has characteristics of a territorial war, in spite of Brazil's indigenous policy being considered one of the most progressive in the world. The conflict highlights the risks being run by an agricultural superpower whose leftist government is trying to sort out centuries of ethnic disputes over ownership of the land from which much of the nation's wealth sprouts. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indians live in a makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indians live in a makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 8, 2013. The Guarani tribe is immersed in a bloody conflict with farmers over possession of their ancestral land that has characteristics of a territorial war, in spite of Brazil's indigenous policy being considered one of the most progressive in the world. The conflict highlights the risks being run by an agricultural superpower whose leftist government is trying to sort out centuries of ethnic disputes over ownership of the land from which much of the nation's wealth sprouts. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indian Dilcia Lopes and her children watch a truck pass from their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 8, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indian Dilcia Lopes and her children watch a truck pass from their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indian Dilcia Lopes and her children watch a truck pass from their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 8, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Jaqcieli Centuro, an Guarani Kaiowa Indian child, stands next to a highway that runs past their ancestral land called Tekoha Boqueron, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 6, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Jaqcieli Centuro, an Guarani Kaiowa Indian child, stands next to a highway that runs past their ancestral land called Tekoha Boqueron, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

Jaqcieli Centuro, an Guarani Kaiowa Indian child, stands next to a highway that runs past their ancestral land called Tekoha Boqueron, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indians walk to the place on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indians walk to the place on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state August 11,...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indians walk to the place on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>A Guarani Kaiowa boys stands in front of his makeshift home on the edge of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Takuara, where their chief Marcos Veron was shot to death in 2003, in Juti, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 12, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

A Guarani Kaiowa boys stands in front of his makeshift home on the edge of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Takuara, where their chief Marcos Veron was shot to death in 2003, in Juti, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 12, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae...more

A Guarani Kaiowa boys stands in front of his makeshift home on the edge of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Takuara, where their chief Marcos Veron was shot to death in 2003, in Juti, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 12, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>A Guarani Kaiowa Indian boy walks past roadside vegetation after a fire set by an unknown arsonist ravaged their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, September 1, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

A Guarani Kaiowa Indian boy walks past roadside vegetation after a fire set by an unknown arsonist ravaged their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they...more

A Guarani Kaiowa Indian boy walks past roadside vegetation after a fire set by an unknown arsonist ravaged their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, September 1, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>A banner placed by Guarani Kaiowa Indians reads, "Enough of killing Indians," on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

A banner placed by Guarani Kaiowa Indians reads, "Enough of killing Indians," on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in...more

A banner placed by Guarani Kaiowa Indians reads, "Enough of killing Indians," on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indian children swim in a pond next to a highway that runs past their ancestral land called Tekoha Boqueron, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indian children swim in a pond next to a highway that runs past their ancestral land called Tekoha Boqueron, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

Guarani Kaiowa Indian children swim in a pond next to a highway that runs past their ancestral land called Tekoha Boqueron, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 6, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indian boys play with a weapon they made from scrap, on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupies part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 11, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indian boys play with a weapon they made from scrap, on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupies part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indian boys play with a weapon they made from scrap, on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupies part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indian Dilcia Lopes and her children live in a makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 8, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indian Dilcia Lopes and her children live in a makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers,...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indian Dilcia Lopes and her children live in a makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 8, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indian Amarilda Carvalinda, 35, lives in her makeshift home on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 11, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indian Amarilda Carvalinda, 35, lives in her makeshift home on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina,...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indian Amarilda Carvalinda, 35, lives in her makeshift home on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Ita'y, where last April a farmer who occupied part of their land attacked them but died in the confrontation, in Douradina, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Ava Indian Paulina Takua Rokavy (back C) teaches children in a school she improvised on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, as they await a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, August 2, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Ava Indian Paulina Takua Rokavy (back C) teaches children in a school she improvised on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, as they await a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira,...more

Guarani Ava Indian Paulina Takua Rokavy (back C) teaches children in a school she improvised on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, as they await a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, August 2, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Amnesty International's Secretary General, Salil Shetty (3rd L, dark blue shirt), meets with Guarani Kaiowa Indians at their makeshift camp on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Amnesty International's Secretary General, Salil Shetty (3rd L, dark blue shirt), meets with Guarani Kaiowa Indians at their makeshift camp on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 7,...more

Amnesty International's Secretary General, Salil Shetty (3rd L, dark blue shirt), meets with Guarani Kaiowa Indians at their makeshift camp on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indians gather at the place where fellow Indian, 15-year-old Denilson Barbosa, was killed by farmer Orlandino Carneiro who was occupying the ancestral land they call Tekoha Pindo Roky, in Caarapo, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 5, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indians gather at the place where fellow Indian, 15-year-old Denilson Barbosa, was killed by farmer Orlandino Carneiro who was occupying the ancestral land they call Tekoha Pindo Roky, in Caarapo, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 5,...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indians gather at the place where fellow Indian, 15-year-old Denilson Barbosa, was killed by farmer Orlandino Carneiro who was occupying the ancestral land they call Tekoha Pindo Roky, in Caarapo, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 5, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indians look at their hut destroyed by a fire set by an unknown arsonist in their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indians look at their hut destroyed by a fire set by an unknown arsonist in their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indians look at their hut destroyed by a fire set by an unknown arsonist in their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indian girl Sandriely cries in front of her hut destroyed by a fire set by an unknown arsonist in their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 31, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indian girl Sandriely cries in front of her hut destroyed by a fire set by an unknown arsonist in their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indian girl Sandriely cries in front of her hut destroyed by a fire set by an unknown arsonist in their makeshift camp squeezed between highway BR 463 and their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, where they have been since 2009 when they last failed to take back the land from farmers, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Ava Indian children have a lunch of peanuts and chica, a drink made from cassava, at their home on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, where they are living while awaiting a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, August 2, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Ava Indian children have a lunch of peanuts and chica, a drink made from cassava, at their home on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, where they are living while awaiting a court's decision on the eviction of farmers...more

Guarani Ava Indian children have a lunch of peanuts and chica, a drink made from cassava, at their home on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, where they are living while awaiting a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, August 2, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>A Guarani Ava Indian girl has her face painted as they live on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, while awaiting a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, August 2, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

A Guarani Ava Indian girl has her face painted as they live on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, while awaiting a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with...more

A Guarani Ava Indian girl has her face painted as they live on the edge of their ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, while awaiting a court's decision on the eviction of farmers occupying the land, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, August 2, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Relatives of assassinated Guarani leaders attend this year's Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, that brings together their chiefs and spiritual leaders in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 27, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Relatives of assassinated Guarani leaders attend this year's Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, that brings together their chiefs and spiritual leaders in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 27, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

Relatives of assassinated Guarani leaders attend this year's Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, that brings together their chiefs and spiritual leaders in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 27, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani spiritual leaders perform the Mita Kara'i, or baptism where children receive their native name and others have their spiritual protection renewed, during the Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, that brings together their chiefs in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 26, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani spiritual leaders perform the Mita Kara'i, or baptism where children receive their native name and others have their spiritual protection renewed, during the Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, that brings together their chiefs in Jaguapiru...more

Guarani spiritual leaders perform the Mita Kara'i, or baptism where children receive their native name and others have their spiritual protection renewed, during the Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, that brings together their chiefs in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 26, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Ava spiritual leaders perform a ritual called Jerokyete to calm the pain of Rosalino Kunumi (back C), in the house of prayer of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Ava spiritual leaders perform a ritual called Jerokyete to calm the pain of Rosalino Kunumi (back C), in the house of prayer of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013....more

Guarani Ava spiritual leaders perform a ritual called Jerokyete to calm the pain of Rosalino Kunumi (back C), in the house of prayer of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Ava spiritual leaders perform a ritual called Jerokyete to calm the pain of Rosalino Kunumi (seated), in the house of prayer of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Ava spiritual leaders perform a ritual called Jerokyete to calm the pain of Rosalino Kunumi (seated), in the house of prayer of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013....more

Guarani Ava spiritual leaders perform a ritual called Jerokyete to calm the pain of Rosalino Kunumi (seated), in the house of prayer of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>A Guarani Ava Indian child lights a ceremonial pipe called a Petygua which wards off bad spirits, during a ritual as they prepare to take back their ancestral plot of land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the southern border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

A Guarani Ava Indian child lights a ceremonial pipe called a Petygua which wards off bad spirits, during a ritual as they prepare to take back their ancestral plot of land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the southern border...more

A Guarani Ava Indian child lights a ceremonial pipe called a Petygua which wards off bad spirits, during a ritual as they prepare to take back their ancestral plot of land they call Tekoha Yvoh'y, in Guaira, Parana state, near the southern border with Paraguay, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>A Guarani Kaiowa woman stands watch near their makeshift camp on the edge of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Takuara, where their chief Marcos Veron was shot to death in 2003, in Juti, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 12, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

A Guarani Kaiowa woman stands watch near their makeshift camp on the edge of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Takuara, where their chief Marcos Veron was shot to death in 2003, in Juti, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 12, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae...more

A Guarani Kaiowa woman stands watch near their makeshift camp on the edge of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Takuara, where their chief Marcos Veron was shot to death in 2003, in Juti, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 12, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani spiritual leaders and chiefs raise their Mbarak, a type of traditional rattle, during what they called a "war cry for justice and land" during this year's Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 27, 2013.  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani spiritual leaders and chiefs raise their Mbarak, a type of traditional rattle, during what they called a "war cry for justice and land" during this year's Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 27,...more

Guarani spiritual leaders and chiefs raise their Mbarak, a type of traditional rattle, during what they called a "war cry for justice and land" during this year's Aty Guasu, or Great Assembly, in Jaguapiru village, Mato Grosso do Sul state, July 27, 2013. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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<p>Guarani Kaiowa Indians carry a protest banner during a visit by Amnesty International's Secretary General, Salil Shetty, to their makeshift camp on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 7, 2013. The banner reads, "No more delays and complications. We demand the immediate demarcation of our traditional lands."  REUTERS/Lunae Parracho</p>

Guarani Kaiowa Indians carry a protest banner during a visit by Amnesty International's Secretary General, Salil Shetty, to their makeshift camp on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state,...more

Guarani Kaiowa Indians carry a protest banner during a visit by Amnesty International's Secretary General, Salil Shetty, to their makeshift camp on the edge of their ancestral land called Tekoha Apika'y, near Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul state, August 7, 2013. The banner reads, "No more delays and complications. We demand the immediate demarcation of our traditional lands." REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

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