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Pictures | Fri Feb 3, 2012 | 7:20pm EST

Dickens turns 200

<p>Tour guide Jean Hayne of London Walks gives a Charles Dickens tour in London, February 3, 2012. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

Tour guide Jean Hayne of London Walks gives a Charles Dickens tour in London, February 3, 2012. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7...more

Tour guide Jean Hayne of London Walks gives a Charles Dickens tour in London, February 3, 2012. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The desk where Charles Dickens wrote "Great Expectations" and "Our Mutual Friend" is displayed at the Museum of London, December 28, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

The desk where Charles Dickens wrote "Great Expectations" and "Our Mutual Friend" is displayed at the Museum of London, December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

The desk where Charles Dickens wrote "Great Expectations" and "Our Mutual Friend" is displayed at the Museum of London, December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Patrons drink at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Patrons drink at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Patrons drink at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Victorian costumes from the era of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Victorian costumes from the era of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Victorian costumes from the era of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A pedestrian walks past the Charles Dickens pub in London January 26, 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A pedestrian walks past the Charles Dickens pub in London January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A pedestrian walks past the Charles Dickens pub in London January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Items of Charles Dickens are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A sign for the Royal Courts of Justice representing the British legal system, something against which Dickens' characters often grapple, much like Dickens himself, who fought against the Poor Laws, is seen in London December 29, 2011. The Royal Courts of Justice were built after Charles Dickens' death. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens, whose novels frequently touched upon the theme of poverty, on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A sign for the Royal Courts of Justice representing the British legal system, something against which Dickens' characters often grapple, much like Dickens himself, who fought against the Poor Laws, is seen in London December 29, 2011. The Royal...more

A sign for the Royal Courts of Justice representing the British legal system, something against which Dickens' characters often grapple, much like Dickens himself, who fought against the Poor Laws, is seen in London December 29, 2011. The Royal Courts of Justice were built after Charles Dickens' death. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens, whose novels frequently touched upon the theme of poverty, on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The Central Criminal Court in England, also known as Old Bailey for the street on which it stands, and that appears in the book "A Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens, as the courthouse where Charles Darnay is put on trial for treason, is seen in London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

The Central Criminal Court in England, also known as Old Bailey for the street on which it stands, and that appears in the book "A Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens, as the courthouse where Charles Darnay is put on trial for treason, is seen in...more

The Central Criminal Court in England, also known as Old Bailey for the street on which it stands, and that appears in the book "A Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens, as the courthouse where Charles Darnay is put on trial for treason, is seen in London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Letters carved into a desk used by Charles Dickens when he was a lowly clerk, before his ascendency to literary stardom, is pictured at the Dickens museum in his former residence in London December 15, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Letters carved into a desk used by Charles Dickens when he was a lowly clerk, before his ascendency to literary stardom, is pictured at the Dickens museum in his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Letters carved into a desk used by Charles Dickens when he was a lowly clerk, before his ascendency to literary stardom, is pictured at the Dickens museum in his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A busker plays a flute in an underpass in London January 10, 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

A busker plays a flute in an underpass in London January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A busker plays a flute in an underpass in London January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Charles Dickens's signature on a hand-written letter is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Charles Dickens's signature on a hand-written letter is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Charles Dickens's signature on a hand-written letter is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Tour guide Jean Hayne of London Walks gives a Charles Dickens tour in London, February 3, 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Tour guide Jean Hayne of London Walks gives a Charles Dickens tour in London, February 3, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Tour guide Jean Hayne of London Walks gives a Charles Dickens tour in London, February 3, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Charles Dickens books are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011.   REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

Charles Dickens books are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Charles Dickens books are displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Sunlight casts shadows on Staple Inn Square, which Charles Dickens often mentioned for it's tranquillity, in London, January 26, 2012. Dickens last novel, the unfinished Mystery of Edwin Drood, Dickens references "a little nook called Staple Inn."  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

Sunlight casts shadows on Staple Inn Square, which Charles Dickens often mentioned for it's tranquillity, in London, January 26, 2012. Dickens last novel, the unfinished Mystery of Edwin Drood, Dickens references "a little nook called Staple Inn." ...more

Sunlight casts shadows on Staple Inn Square, which Charles Dickens often mentioned for it's tranquillity, in London, January 26, 2012. Dickens last novel, the unfinished Mystery of Edwin Drood, Dickens references "a little nook called Staple Inn." REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A cell wall from the Wellclose Square prison bears names and dates carved into the wall, at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A cell wall from the Wellclose Square prison bears names and dates carved into the wall, at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A cell wall from the Wellclose Square prison bears names and dates carved into the wall, at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011.   REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Ivy covers a Victorian-era grave stone in a cemetery, reflecting Charles Dickens recurring theme of death, in London, December 29, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

Ivy covers a Victorian-era grave stone in a cemetery, reflecting Charles Dickens recurring theme of death, in London, December 29, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Ivy covers a Victorian-era grave stone in a cemetery, reflecting Charles Dickens recurring theme of death, in London, December 29, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The front of Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

The front of Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

The front of Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The menu at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, London December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

The menu at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, London December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

The menu at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in A Tale of Two Cities, London December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Farmers' produce is displayed at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London, January 26 , 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Farmers' produce is displayed at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London, January 26 , 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Farmers' produce is displayed at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London, January 26 , 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Game hangs at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London January 26 , 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Game hangs at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London January 26 , 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Game hangs at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London January 26 , 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church was the first in London to have a clock with minute hands on the dial and features in Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol, in London, December 19 ,2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church was the first in London to have a clock with minute hands on the dial and features in Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol, in London, December 19 ,2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church was the first in London to have a clock with minute hands on the dial and features in Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol, in London, December 19 ,2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Cliffords Inn is pictured, where in Charles Dickens novel, Little Dorrit the character Tip works as a clerk and where Dickens often wandered, in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Cliffords Inn is pictured, where in Charles Dickens novel, Little Dorrit the character Tip works as a clerk and where Dickens often wandered, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Cliffords Inn is pictured, where in Charles Dickens novel, Little Dorrit the character Tip works as a clerk and where Dickens often wandered, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A plaque marks the site of a former prison where Charles Dickens' father was jailed for debt in London, January 12 2012. His father's incarceration led Dickens into a difficult childhood, which is reflected in many of his novels, where children suffer or are orphaned.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A plaque marks the site of a former prison where Charles Dickens' father was jailed for debt in London, January 12 2012. His father's incarceration led Dickens into a difficult childhood, which is reflected in many of his novels, where children...more

A plaque marks the site of a former prison where Charles Dickens' father was jailed for debt in London, January 12 2012. His father's incarceration led Dickens into a difficult childhood, which is reflected in many of his novels, where children suffer or are orphaned. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The grave of Charles Dickens is marked in Westminister Abbey, where he was buried against his will, in London, February 3 , 2012. Dickens wanted a private, unadvertised funeral where nobody should wear any "scarf, cloak, black bow, long hatband or other such revolting absurdity." Public demand meant he was buried at the Abbey's Poet's Corner, but only 12 people attending his burial. His grave was left open for days and filled with flowers thrown by thousands who came to pay their respects.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

The grave of Charles Dickens is marked in Westminister Abbey, where he was buried against his will, in London, February 3 , 2012. Dickens wanted a private, unadvertised funeral where nobody should wear any "scarf, cloak, black bow, long hatband or...more

The grave of Charles Dickens is marked in Westminister Abbey, where he was buried against his will, in London, February 3 , 2012. Dickens wanted a private, unadvertised funeral where nobody should wear any "scarf, cloak, black bow, long hatband or other such revolting absurdity." Public demand meant he was buried at the Abbey's Poet's Corner, but only 12 people attending his burial. His grave was left open for days and filled with flowers thrown by thousands who came to pay their respects. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Letters hang in an exhibition about Charles Dickens at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Letters hang in an exhibition about Charles Dickens at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Letters hang in an exhibition about Charles Dickens at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>One of the dresses worn by U.S. actress Gillian Anderson for the role of Miss Havisham in the recent BBC TV adaptation of Charles Dickens Great Expectations, hangs on display at the Museum of London December 28, 2011.    REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

One of the dresses worn by U.S. actress Gillian Anderson for the role of Miss Havisham in the recent BBC TV adaptation of Charles Dickens Great Expectations, hangs on display at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly more

One of the dresses worn by U.S. actress Gillian Anderson for the role of Miss Havisham in the recent BBC TV adaptation of Charles Dickens Great Expectations, hangs on display at the Museum of London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A hand-written letter by Charles Dickens is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A hand-written letter by Charles Dickens is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A hand-written letter by Charles Dickens is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A plaque marks the principal residence of Charles Dickens in London December 15, 2011.  The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012. Picture taken December 15, 2011.  To match Travel Postcard TRAVEL-LONDON/DICKENS  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA PROFILE)</p>

A plaque marks the principal residence of Charles Dickens in London December 15, 2011. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012....more

A plaque marks the principal residence of Charles Dickens in London December 15, 2011. The month of February marks an international celebration of the life and work of Charles Dickens on the bicentenary of his birth, which falls on 7 February 2012. Picture taken December 15, 2011. To match Travel Postcard TRAVEL-LONDON/DICKENS REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA PROFILE)

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<p>A hand-written Charles Dickens letter is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

A hand-written Charles Dickens letter is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A hand-written Charles Dickens letter is displayed at the Dickens museum at his former residence in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A plaque marks the principal residence of Charles Dickens in London December 15, 2011.   REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A plaque marks the principal residence of Charles Dickens in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A plaque marks the principal residence of Charles Dickens in London December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A Victorian-era grave stone in a cemetery, reflecting Charles Dickens recurring theme of death, in London, December 29, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

A Victorian-era grave stone in a cemetery, reflecting Charles Dickens recurring theme of death, in London, December 29, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A Victorian-era grave stone in a cemetery, reflecting Charles Dickens recurring theme of death, in London, December 29, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The two figures striking the clock at St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church were those whose chimes awoke the Charles Dickens character Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

The two figures striking the clock at St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church were those whose chimes awoke the Charles Dickens character Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

The two figures striking the clock at St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church were those whose chimes awoke the Charles Dickens character Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Flagstones at St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church which features in Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol", in London, December 19, 2011.   REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Flagstones at St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church which features in Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Flagstones at St. Dunstan-in-the-West Church which features in Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Old bricks form a crumbling wall near Fleet Street, a common haunt of Charles Dickens in London December 19, 2011.    REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

Old bricks form a crumbling wall near Fleet Street, a common haunt of Charles Dickens in London December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Old bricks form a crumbling wall near Fleet Street, a common haunt of Charles Dickens in London December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>St. Andrew's church is pictured in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

St. Andrew's church is pictured in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

St. Andrew's church is pictured in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement and made into meat pies, in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement...more

The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement and made into meat pies, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement and made into meat pies, in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement...more

The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement and made into meat pies, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement and made into meat pies, in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement...more

The alley of Hen and Chickens Court is where the fictional character the mad demon barber Sweeney Todd, who was referenced by Charles Dickens, had his shop and where his victims had their throats cut before their bodies were dropped into a a basement and made into meat pies, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A window at Clifford's Inn, where in Charles Dickens novel, Little Dorrit the character Tip works as a clerk and where Dickens often wandered, in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A window at Clifford's Inn, where in Charles Dickens novel, Little Dorrit the character Tip works as a clerk and where Dickens often wandered, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A window at Clifford's Inn, where in Charles Dickens novel, Little Dorrit the character Tip works as a clerk and where Dickens often wandered, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011.   REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Farmers' produce is displayed at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London, January 26, 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Farmers' produce is displayed at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Farmers' produce is displayed at Borough Market, an area familiar to Charles Dickens and mentioned in The Pickwick Papers, London, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Prince Henry's Room on Fleet Street was formerly an inn frequented by Charles Dickens as a young man, in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

Prince Henry's Room on Fleet Street was formerly an inn frequented by Charles Dickens as a young man, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Prince Henry's Room on Fleet Street was formerly an inn frequented by Charles Dickens as a young man, in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>A meal and pint of beer is pictured at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in "A Tale of Two Cities", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

A meal and pint of beer is pictured at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in "A Tale of Two Cities", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A meal and pint of beer is pictured at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in "A Tale of Two Cities", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Coats hang from a hook at the Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in "A Tale of Two Cities", in London, December 19, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Coats hang from a hook at the Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in "A Tale of Two Cities", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Coats hang from a hook at the Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub, one of London's oldest pubs and one of Charles Dickens favourites, alluded to in "A Tale of Two Cities", in London, December 19, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011.   REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Rules restaurant is the oldest in London and at the height of his fame Charles Dickens had a table reserved with a view over the blacking factory where he used to work as a boy, in London, December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The George pub was frequented by Charles Dickens and other literary giants, in London, January 26, 2012.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly</p>

The George pub was frequented by Charles Dickens and other literary giants, in London, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

The George pub was frequented by Charles Dickens and other literary giants, in London, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>Charles Dickens was an insomniac and often wandered by night in search of inspiration along city streets, including Fleet Street, seen here with the dome of St. Paul's cathedral in he distance, in London December 28, 2011.  REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

Charles Dickens was an insomniac and often wandered by night in search of inspiration along city streets, including Fleet Street, seen here with the dome of St. Paul's cathedral in he distance, in London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly more

Charles Dickens was an insomniac and often wandered by night in search of inspiration along city streets, including Fleet Street, seen here with the dome of St. Paul's cathedral in he distance, in London December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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