Edition:
United States

Ecuador's Correa enjoys re-election, seeks investment

Share Slideshow
Photographer
GARY GRANJA

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa celebrates with his Vice President-elect Jorge Glass after hearing results at Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Granja

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa celebrates with his Vice President-elect Jorge Glass after hearing results at Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Granja
Close
1 / 7
Photographer
STRINGER

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa reacts after hearing the election results at Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. Correa claimed a re-election victory on Sunday that would allow him to strengthen state control over the OPEC nation's economy and gives a timely boost to Latin America's alliance of socialist leaders. REUTERS/Gary Granja

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa reacts after hearing the election results at Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. Correa claimed a re-election victory on Sunday that would allow him to strengthen state control over the OPEC nation's economy and gives a timely boost to Latin America's alliance of socialist leaders. REUTERS/Gary Granja
Close
2 / 7
Photographer
STRINGER

(L-R) Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, his son Rafael Miguel, his daughter Anne Dominique, his wife Anne Malherbe, and Fernando Cordero, National Assembly president, react after hearing the elections results at Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Granja

(L-R) Ecuador's President Rafael Correa, his son Rafael Miguel, his daughter Anne Dominique, his wife Anne Malherbe, and Fernando Cordero, National Assembly president, react after hearing the elections results at Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Granja
Close
3 / 7
Photographer
� GARY GRANJA / Reuters

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa addresses his supporters from a balcony of Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Granja

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa addresses his supporters from a balcony of Carondelet Palace in Quito February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Granja
Close
4 / 7
Photographer
GUILLERMO GRANJA

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa casts his ballot at a polling station at San Francisco de Quito School in Quito February 17, 2013. Ecuadoreans vote for president on Sunday in a ballot expected to hand incumbent Correa a new term to advance his socialist agenda of heavy government spending and expansion of state power that critics slam as creeping authoritarianism. REUTERS/Guillermo Granja

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa casts his ballot at a polling station at San Francisco de Quito School in Quito February 17, 2013. Ecuadoreans vote for president on Sunday in a ballot expected to hand incumbent Correa a new term to advance his socialist agenda of heavy government spending and expansion of state power that critics slam as creeping authoritarianism. REUTERS/Guillermo Granja
Close
5 / 7
Photographer
GUILLERMO GRANJA

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa looks for his identity card before casting his ballot at a polling station at San Francisco de Quito School in Quito February 17, 2013. Ecuadoreans vote for president on Sunday in a ballot expected to hand incumbent Correa a new term to advance his socialist agenda of heavy government spending and expansion of state power that critics slam as creeping authoritarianism. REUTERS/Guillermo Granja

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa looks for his identity card before casting his ballot at a polling station at San Francisco de Quito School in Quito February 17, 2013. Ecuadoreans vote for president on Sunday in a ballot expected to hand incumbent Correa a new term to advance his socialist agenda of heavy government spending and expansion of state power that critics slam as creeping authoritarianism. REUTERS/Guillermo Granja
Close
6 / 7
Photographer
GUILLERMO GRANJA

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa casts his ballot at a polling station at San Francisco de Quito School in Quito February 17, 2013. Ecuadoreans vote for president on Sunday in a ballot expected to hand incumbent Correa a new term to advance his socialist agenda of heavy government spending and expansion of state power that critics slam as creeping authoritarianism. REUTERS/Guillermo Granja

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa casts his ballot at a polling station at San Francisco de Quito School in Quito February 17, 2013. Ecuadoreans vote for president on Sunday in a ballot expected to hand incumbent Correa a new term to advance his socialist agenda of heavy government spending and expansion of state power that critics slam as creeping authoritarianism. REUTERS/Guillermo Granja
Close
7 / 7

All Collections

Munich shooting attack

Saturday, July 23, 2016

All Collections

Hillary chooses Kaine

Friday, July 22, 2016

All Collections

Best of Comic-Con

Friday, July 22, 2016

All Collections

Police funerals in Baton Rouge

Friday, July 22, 2016

All Collections

RNC closing night

Friday, July 22, 2016

All Collections

Frontlines of Libya

Friday, July 22, 2016

All Collections

Rio's Olympic venues

Friday, July 22, 2016

All Collections

On the RNC floor

Friday, July 22, 2016