Edition:
United States
Pictures | Wed Feb 13, 2013 | 10:41am EST

Finance minister chides Venezuela's dollar "nymphomaniacs"

A worker arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price controls make it more difficult for those companies to protect their profits. On Friday Venezuela devalued the bolivar by 32 percent, its fifth such move in a decade. For U.S. companies that do substantial business in the country, such as Colgate-Palmolive Co, Avon Products Inc, Procter & Gamble Co and Kimberly-Clark Corp , that means their earnings in bolivars are now worth less when converted back to dollars. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A worker arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price...more

A worker arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price controls make it more difficult for those companies to protect their profits. On Friday Venezuela devalued the bolivar by 32 percent, its fifth such move in a decade. For U.S. companies that do substantial business in the country, such as Colgate-Palmolive Co, Avon Products Inc, Procter & Gamble Co and Kimberly-Clark Corp , that means their earnings in bolivars are now worth less when converted back to dollars. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
1 / 3
A worker arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price controls make it more difficult for those companies to protect their profits. On Friday Venezuela devalued the bolivar by 32 percent, its fifth such move in a decade. For U.S. companies that do substantial business in the country, such as Colgate-Palmolive Co, Avon Products Inc, Procter & Gamble Co and Kimberly-Clark Corp , that means their earnings in bolivars are now worth less when converted back to dollars. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A worker arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price...more

A worker arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price controls make it more difficult for those companies to protect their profits. On Friday Venezuela devalued the bolivar by 32 percent, its fifth such move in a decade. For U.S. companies that do substantial business in the country, such as Colgate-Palmolive Co, Avon Products Inc, Procter & Gamble Co and Kimberly-Clark Corp , that means their earnings in bolivars are now worth less when converted back to dollars. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
2 / 3
A workers arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price controls make it more difficult for those companies to protect their profits. On Friday Venezuela devalued the bolivar by 32 percent, its fifth such move in a decade. For U.S. companies that do substantial business in the country, such as Colgate-Palmolive Co, Avon Products Inc, Procter & Gamble Co and Kimberly-Clark Corp , that means their earnings in bolivars are now worth less when converted back to dollars. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A workers arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price...more

A workers arranges Colgate products on a shelf at a supermarket in Caracas February 12, 2013. Venezuela's latest currency devaluation will hurt a range of U.S. and European companies that sell to consumers in the country, as state-imposed price controls make it more difficult for those companies to protect their profits. On Friday Venezuela devalued the bolivar by 32 percent, its fifth such move in a decade. For U.S. companies that do substantial business in the country, such as Colgate-Palmolive Co, Avon Products Inc, Procter & Gamble Co and Kimberly-Clark Corp , that means their earnings in bolivars are now worth less when converted back to dollars. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Close
3 / 3

Next Slideshows

NYSE says no issues publishing quotes, system operating normally

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The New York Stock Exchange said on Wednesday the exchange is not having issues publishing quotes and trades in the symbol R through Y, and...

Feb 13 2013

Analysis: G20 host Russia struggles with chronic investor mistrust

LONDON (Reuters) - A $2 trillion economy, a seat at the top table of world powers and a stock market that trades at valuations cheaper than Pakistan - G20 host...

Feb 13 2013

Britain's central bank chief riled by G7 mixed messages

LONDON/MOSCOW (Reuters) - A Group of Seven statement designed to cool international currency tensions should be taken at face value and anonymous officials...

Feb 13 2013

No sectors excluded from U.S. free trade talks: EU trade chief

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - No commercial sectors have been excluded from the European Union's free trade talks the United States, but the EU will introduce "sensitive...

Feb 13 2013

MORE IN PICTURES

Swarm of bees removed from Times Square

Swarm of bees removed from Times Square

A beekeeper removes a large swarm of bees that had taken up residence on a building in Times Square, New York.

Endgame in Mosul

Endgame in Mosul

Iraqi forces push towards the river side of Mosul's Old City, their key target in the eight-month campaign to take the city from Islamic State.

Syria's Assad in rare visits outside capital

Syria's Assad in rare visits outside capital

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has been touring areas north of Damascus in recent days, a rare trip out of his seat of power in the capital.

Wild horses return to Mongolia's steppes

Wild horses return to Mongolia's steppes

Przewalski's horses, driven to extinction in their Mongolian homeland in the 1960s, are repopulated in their ancestral arid deserts and mountains.

Obama post-presidency

Obama post-presidency

The life of former President Barack Obama since Trump's inauguration.

Trump meets Modi

Trump meets Modi

President Donald Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi hold their first face-to-face meeting in Washington seeking to boost U.S.-Indian relations despite differences over trade, the Paris climate accord and immigration.

Venezuela's symphony of protests

Venezuela's symphony of protests

Protesters play violins, flutes and guitars as they take to the streets of Caracas in demonstrations against President Nicolas Maduro.

Asylum seekers stuck in Canadian legal limbo

Asylum seekers stuck in Canadian legal limbo

Thousands of people who fled to Canada to escape President Donald Trump's crackdown on illegal migrants have become trapped in legal limbo because of an overburdened refugee system, struggling to find work, permanent housing or enroll their children in schools.

New Zealand wins America's Cup

New Zealand wins America's Cup

A dominant Emirates Team New Zealand claims international sport's oldest trophy by 7-1 over Oracle Team USA in Bermuda's Great Sound, with 26-year-old Peter Burling becoming the youngest helmsman to secure the America's Cup.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast