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Frozen Florida

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Icicles hang from an orange tree after it was sprayed with water to protect it from the cold weather in Plant City, Florida, January 6, 2010. Frigid temperatures below the freezing mark have not been seen in parts of south Florida in 30 years. REUTERS/Scott Audette

Icicles hang from an orange tree after it was sprayed with water to protect it from the cold weather in Plant City, Florida, January 6, 2010. Frigid temperatures below the freezing mark have not been seen in parts of south Florida in 30 years. REUTERS/Scott Audette

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A tourist walks in front of a swimming suit store in South Beach Miami, Florida, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A tourist walks in front of a swimming suit store in South Beach Miami, Florida, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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A dead iguana lies on a path after falling out of a tree as morning joggers walk with their dog in Davie, Florida, January 10, 2010. Frigid temperatures below the freezing mark are causing some of the tropical wildlife to either freeze or fall into a sleep-like state because of a drop in body temperature. REUTERS/Hans Deryk

A dead iguana lies on a path after falling out of a tree as morning joggers walk with their dog in Davie, Florida, January 10, 2010. Frigid temperatures below the freezing mark are causing some of the tropical wildlife to either freeze or fall into a sleep-like state because of a drop in body temperature. REUTERS/Hans Deryk

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Tropical fish farmer Michael Breen holds a dead snook cichlid, one of the thousands of his fish killed by repeated days of cold temperatures in his ponds in Loxahatchee, Florida in Palm Beach County January 11, 2010. Breen said that he lost more than 100,000 fish to the freezing temperatures and estimates his loss to be more than $500,000. REUTERS/Joe Skipper (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS ANIMALS)

Tropical fish farmer Michael Breen holds a dead snook cichlid, one of the thousands of his fish killed by repeated days of cold temperatures in his ponds in Loxahatchee, Florida in Palm Beach County January 11, 2010. Breen said that he lost more than 100,000 fish to the freezing temperatures and estimates his loss to be more than $500,000. REUTERS/Joe Skipper (UNITED STATES - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS ANIMALS)

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Icicles hang from a sign on a strawberry farm in Plant City, Florida, January 6, 2010. REUTERS/Scott Audette

Icicles hang from a sign on a strawberry farm in Plant City, Florida, January 6, 2010. REUTERS/Scott Audette

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A tourist walks along Lincoln road in South Beach Miami, Florida, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A tourist walks along Lincoln road in South Beach Miami, Florida, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Darryl Mhoon rescues a comatose iguana out of a canal after it fell out of a tree in Davie, Florida, January 10, 2010. Mhoon was hoping to bring the iguana home and keep it warm for a few days until temperatures return to normal. REUTERS/Hans Deryk

Darryl Mhoon rescues a comatose iguana out of a canal after it fell out of a tree in Davie, Florida, January 10, 2010. Mhoon was hoping to bring the iguana home and keep it warm for a few days until temperatures return to normal. REUTERS/Hans Deryk

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Tourists leave the beach in South Beach Miami, January 10, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Tourists leave the beach in South Beach Miami, January 10, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Ice hangs from a fence in Loxahatchee in Palm Beach County, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Ice hangs from a fence in Loxahatchee in Palm Beach County, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

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Manatees gather near the outlet where Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) pipes warm the water at an inactive power plant undergoing renovation works in Riviera Beach, Florida, January 7, 2010. With 61 degrees Fahrenheit being the minimum temperature that a manatee needs to survive, FPL is helping prevent deaths by turning on the heaters at the plant for the manatees. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Manatees gather near the outlet where Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) pipes warm the water at an inactive power plant undergoing renovation works in Riviera Beach, Florida, January 7, 2010. With 61 degrees Fahrenheit being the minimum temperature that a manatee needs to survive, FPL is helping prevent deaths by turning on the heaters at the plant for the manatees. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Manatees gather near the outlet where pipes warm the water, at an inactive power plant undergoing renovation works in Riviera Beach, Florida, January 7, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Manatees gather near the outlet where pipes warm the water, at an inactive power plant undergoing renovation works in Riviera Beach, Florida, January 7, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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A tourist wearing a jacket sit at the beach in South Beach Miami, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A tourist wearing a jacket sit at the beach in South Beach Miami, January 11, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Tourists walk along Ocean Drive in South Beach Miami, January 10, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Tourists walk along Ocean Drive in South Beach Miami, January 10, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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