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Pictures | Mon Dec 30, 2013 | 2:50pm EST

Fukushima's homeless workers

<p>Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, speaks during an interview with Reuters at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. Nishiyama says he briefly worked for Shuto, a firm with Fukushima decontamination contracts, clearing rubble. He now sleeps on a cardboard box in Sendai Station. He says he left after a dispute over wages, one of several he has had with construction firms, including two handling decontamination jobs. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, speaks during an interview with Reuters at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. Nishiyama says he briefly worked for Shuto, a firm with Fukushima decontamination...more

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, speaks during an interview with Reuters at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. Nishiyama says he briefly worked for Shuto, a firm with Fukushima decontamination contracts, clearing rubble. He now sleeps on a cardboard box in Sendai Station. He says he left after a dispute over wages, one of several he has had with construction firms, including two handling decontamination jobs. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>The signboard of Sendai Station is seen under the moonlight in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. Recruiters for firms with Fukushima decontamination contracts often prowl the station, seeking people willing to accept minimum wage for one of the most undesirable jobs in the industrialized world: working on the $35 billion, taxpayer-funded effort to clean up radioactive fallout. The cleanup effort is being dogged by both a lack of oversight and a shortage of workers, according to a Reuters analysis. Below the subcontractors, a shadowy network of gangsters and illegal brokers who hire homeless men has also become active in Fukushima. Ministry of Environment contracts in the most radioactive areas of Fukushima prefecture are particularly lucrative because the government pays an additional $100 in hazard allowance per day for each worker. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

The signboard of Sendai Station is seen under the moonlight in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. Recruiters for firms with Fukushima decontamination contracts often prowl the station, seeking people willing to accept minimum wage for one of...more

The signboard of Sendai Station is seen under the moonlight in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. Recruiters for firms with Fukushima decontamination contracts often prowl the station, seeking people willing to accept minimum wage for one of the most undesirable jobs in the industrialized world: working on the $35 billion, taxpayer-funded effort to clean up radioactive fallout. The cleanup effort is being dogged by both a lack of oversight and a shortage of workers, according to a Reuters analysis. Below the subcontractors, a shadowy network of gangsters and illegal brokers who hire homeless men has also become active in Fukushima. Ministry of Environment contracts in the most radioactive areas of Fukushima prefecture are particularly lucrative because the government pays an additional $100 in hazard allowance per day for each worker. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Homeless men snuggle in sleeping bags inside a fountain and on bench seats at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Homeless men snuggle in sleeping bags inside a fountain and on bench seats at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Homeless men snuggle in sleeping bags inside a fountain and on bench seats at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>A homeless man snuggles in a sleeping bag on a bench at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

A homeless man snuggles in a sleeping bag on a bench at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

A homeless man snuggles in a sleeping bag on a bench at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Plastic bags containing belongings of homeless men are placed on a signpost at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Plastic bags containing belongings of homeless men are placed on a signpost at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Plastic bags containing belongings of homeless men are placed on a signpost at an underground passage near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Shizuya Nishiyama (R), a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, and an another homeless man sleep on the ground as a passerby walks past at a concourse of Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama (R), a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, and an another homeless man sleep on the ground as a passerby walks past at a concourse of Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Shizuya Nishiyama (R), a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, and an another homeless man sleep on the ground as a passerby walks past at a concourse of Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>People walk on an overhead bridge near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

People walk on an overhead bridge near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

People walk on an overhead bridge near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, rests on a bench at a park near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, rests on a bench at a park near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, rests on a bench at a park near Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>A sign board for recruitment is displayed at Shuto Kogyo's dormitory for workers as snow falls in Tome, Miyagi prefecture, December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Antoni Slodkowski</p>

A sign board for recruitment is displayed at Shuto Kogyo's dormitory for workers as snow falls in Tome, Miyagi prefecture, December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Antoni Slodkowski

A sign board for recruitment is displayed at Shuto Kogyo's dormitory for workers as snow falls in Tome, Miyagi prefecture, December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Antoni Slodkowski

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<p>Workers' boots are seen through a window at Shuto Kogyo's dormitory for workers in Tome, Miyagi prefecture, December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Antoni Slodkowski</p>

Workers' boots are seen through a window at Shuto Kogyo's dormitory for workers in Tome, Miyagi prefecture, December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Antoni Slodkowski

Workers' boots are seen through a window at Shuto Kogyo's dormitory for workers in Tome, Miyagi prefecture, December 20, 2013. REUTERS/Antoni Slodkowski

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<p>Seiji Sasa, a 67-year-old former professional wrestling promoter, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his home in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. Sasa was photographed by undercover police recruiting homeless men at the Sendai train station to work in the nuclear cleanup.  "I don't ask questions; that's not my job," Sasa said in an interview with Reuters. "I just find people and send them to work. I send them and get money in exchange. That's it. I don't get involved in what happens after that." REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Seiji Sasa, a 67-year-old former professional wrestling promoter, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his home in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. Sasa was photographed by undercover police recruiting homeless men at the Sendai train...more

Seiji Sasa, a 67-year-old former professional wrestling promoter, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his home in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. Sasa was photographed by undercover police recruiting homeless men at the Sendai train station to work in the nuclear cleanup. "I don't ask questions; that's not my job," Sasa said in an interview with Reuters. "I just find people and send them to work. I send them and get money in exchange. That's it. I don't get involved in what happens after that." REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, speaks during an interview with Reuters at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, speaks during an interview with Reuters at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, speaks during an interview with Reuters at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, shows a notebook for radioactive exposure management for workers involved in the cleanup of areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, shows a notebook for radioactive exposure management for workers involved in the cleanup of areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan,...more

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, shows a notebook for radioactive exposure management for workers involved in the cleanup of areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, poses for a photo in front of an automatic ticket barrier at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, poses for a photo in front of an automatic ticket barrier at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, poses for a photo in front of an automatic ticket barrier at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, takes an escalator at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, takes an escalator at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

Shizuya Nishiyama, a 57-year-old homeless man from Hokkaido, takes an escalator at Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 18, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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<p>A homeless man rests on the ground at a concourse of Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato</p>

A homeless man rests on the ground at a concourse of Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

A homeless man rests on the ground at a concourse of Sendai Station in Sendai, northern Japan, December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Issei Kato

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