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Genetically modified animals

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Genetically engineered Pterophyllum Scalara fish glow in a tank under a blacklight while being displayed at the 2013 Bio Expo in Taipei, July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

Genetically engineered Pterophyllum Scalara fish glow in a tank under a blacklight while being displayed at the 2013 Bio Expo in Taipei, July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

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Genetically engineered angelfish (Pterophyllum) glow in a tank under a blacklight, at a fish farm in Pingtung, southern Taiwan, September 16, 2010. The fish are the world's first fluorescent angelfish which were created by a joint project between Taiwan?s Academia Sinica and Jy Lin, a private biotechnology company. The breed is the largest fluorescent fish in the world which are able to mate and reproduce, said Yu-Ho Lin, Chairman...more

Genetically engineered angelfish (Pterophyllum) glow in a tank under a blacklight, at a fish farm in Pingtung, southern Taiwan, September 16, 2010. The fish are the world's first fluorescent angelfish which were created by a joint project between Taiwan?s Academia Sinica and Jy Lin, a private biotechnology company. The breed is the largest fluorescent fish in the world which are able to mate and reproduce, said Yu-Ho Lin, Chairman of Jy Lin. The fish are expected to be sold at around $30 after certification. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

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Two transgenic pigs are irradiated under ultraviolet radiation showing their green fluorescence protein (GFP) feature at a hogpen in Harbin, northeast China's Heilongjiang province December 26, 2006. China's first three transgenic pigs were bred successfully, China Daily reported. REUTERS/China Daily

Two transgenic pigs are irradiated under ultraviolet radiation showing their green fluorescence protein (GFP) feature at a hogpen in Harbin, northeast China's Heilongjiang province December 26, 2006. China's first three transgenic pigs were bred successfully, China Daily reported. REUTERS/China Daily

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Dr Ian Wilmut, leader of the team that created Dolly the sheep - the world's first mammal cloned from an adult cell - faces her as she goes on display at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh, April 9 ,2003. Dolly, who born on July 5 1996 after her creation by the Roslin Institute research centre, died in February 2003 after the decision was taken to "euthanase" her when it was discovered she had a progressive lung disease....more

Dr Ian Wilmut, leader of the team that created Dolly the sheep - the world's first mammal cloned from an adult cell - faces her as she goes on display at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh, April 9 ,2003. Dolly, who born on July 5 1996 after her creation by the Roslin Institute research centre, died in February 2003 after the decision was taken to "euthanase" her when it was discovered she had a progressive lung disease. She has now been preserved for public display at the Museum. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell

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Two featherless chickens peck around in some grass May 22, 2002 at the Hebrew University in Rehovot. Israeli scientists at the Agriculture department of the university have genetically engineered bare-skinned chickens as part of a research project to develop succulent, low fat poultry that is environmentally friendly. The naked chicken, as the bird has been dubbed, would also save poultry farmers large amounts of money on...more

Two featherless chickens peck around in some grass May 22, 2002 at the Hebrew University in Rehovot. Israeli scientists at the Agriculture department of the university have genetically engineered bare-skinned chickens as part of a research project to develop succulent, low fat poultry that is environmentally friendly. The naked chicken, as the bird has been dubbed, would also save poultry farmers large amounts of money on ventilation to prevent their chickens from overheating. REUTERS/Havakuk Levison

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Researchers said on April 26, 1999 that they had genetically engineered goats to produce a human protein used to affect blood clotting -- and then cloned the goats. The team -- at Framingham, Massachusetts -based Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, Tufts University and Louisiana State University -- said their three female goats, shown in this undated photograph, were born last fall. REUTERS/Handout

Researchers said on April 26, 1999 that they had genetically engineered goats to produce a human protein used to affect blood clotting -- and then cloned the goats. The team -- at Framingham, Massachusetts -based Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, Tufts University and Louisiana State University -- said their three female goats, shown in this undated photograph, were born last fall. REUTERS/Handout

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Snuppy (R), the first male dog cloned from adult cells by somatic nuclear cell transfer, and a male Afghan hound from which an adult skin cell was taken to clone Snuppy, are seen in this handout photo released in Seoul, August 3, 2005. Man's best friend joined the list of cloned animals as South Korean scientists led announced they had created the world's first cloned dog from an Afghan hound. REUTERS/Stringer

Snuppy (R), the first male dog cloned from adult cells by somatic nuclear cell transfer, and a male Afghan hound from which an adult skin cell was taken to clone Snuppy, are seen in this handout photo released in Seoul, August 3, 2005. Man's best friend joined the list of cloned animals as South Korean scientists led announced they had created the world's first cloned dog from an Afghan hound. REUTERS/Stringer

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The world's first cloned camel, Injaz (front), is seen at the Camel Reproduction Centre in Dubai, April 15, 2009. The female camel calf was born on April 8, created from cells harvested from the ovary of an adult she-camel which were grown in culture before being frozen in liquid nitrogen. REUTERS/Khalifa Al Yousef

The world's first cloned camel, Injaz (front), is seen at the Camel Reproduction Centre in Dubai, April 15, 2009. The female camel calf was born on April 8, created from cells harvested from the ovary of an adult she-camel which were grown in culture before being frozen in liquid nitrogen. REUTERS/Khalifa Al Yousef

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Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion, a 48 day old cloned foal, runs in a field outside the northern Italian city of Cremona April 14, 2005. Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion was born February 25, 2005 from the genes of castrated endurance champion Pieraz, an Arab stallion. The genetics companies LTR-CIZ and Cryzootech say that it is the first clone reproduced for the purposes of making a breeding animal from a sterile animal. REUTERS/Daniele la...more

Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion, a 48 day old cloned foal, runs in a field outside the northern Italian city of Cremona April 14, 2005. Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion was born February 25, 2005 from the genes of castrated endurance champion Pieraz, an Arab stallion. The genetics companies LTR-CIZ and Cryzootech say that it is the first clone reproduced for the purposes of making a breeding animal from a sterile animal. REUTERS/Daniele la Monaca

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Johns Hopkins University scientists Se-Jun Lee (L) and Alexandra McPherron (R) view a normal mouse and a genetically-engineered mouse (R) that is two to three times more muscular than the normal mouse. Scientists McPherron, Se-Jin Lee and Ann Lawler created the muscle-bound mouse while working on a newly-discovered gene. The mice may help researchers find treatments for muscular dystrophy or the muscle wasting that accompanies...more

Johns Hopkins University scientists Se-Jun Lee (L) and Alexandra McPherron (R) view a normal mouse and a genetically-engineered mouse (R) that is two to three times more muscular than the normal mouse. Scientists McPherron, Se-Jin Lee and Ann Lawler created the muscle-bound mouse while working on a newly-discovered gene. The mice may help researchers find treatments for muscular dystrophy or the muscle wasting that accompanies cancer or AIDS. REUTERS/Handout

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A cloned fluorescent puppy, a three-month-old beagle, is seen with a researcher at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul May 13, 2009. The puppy is one of "2nd generation Ruppies", offspring of "Ruppy", the world's first transgenic dog which carries fluorescent genes. They took a fluorescent protein, much like that produced by some sea anenomes, and inserted it into the cell of a beagle. The name...more

A cloned fluorescent puppy, a three-month-old beagle, is seen with a researcher at Seoul National University's College of Veterinary Medicine in Seoul May 13, 2009. The puppy is one of "2nd generation Ruppies", offspring of "Ruppy", the world's first transgenic dog which carries fluorescent genes. They took a fluorescent protein, much like that produced by some sea anenomes, and inserted it into the cell of a beagle. The name "Ruppy" is a combination of the words "Ruby" and "Puppy", and the offsprings of such dogs will possess the same fluorescent gene as their mothers. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak

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A salamander swims in an aquarium at Mexico City's National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM ) laboratory June 10, 2009. Scientists are genetically modifying a bizarre looking Mexican salamander, which according to ancient mythology is a transformed Aztec god, in the hope its ability to regenerate body parts will one day help human amputees. Also known as "water monsters," the half-foot-long (15-cm-long) axolotl is nearly...more

A salamander swims in an aquarium at Mexico City's National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM ) laboratory June 10, 2009. Scientists are genetically modifying a bizarre looking Mexican salamander, which according to ancient mythology is a transformed Aztec god, in the hope its ability to regenerate body parts will one day help human amputees. Also known as "water monsters," the half-foot-long (15-cm-long) axolotl is nearly extinct in its only remaining habitat: the polluted vestiges of Aztec canals that snake though southern Mexico City, packed with colourful boats carrying tourists and mariachi musicians. REUTERS/Felipe Leon

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Italian PHD Gabriella Dobrowolny holds a genetically modified mouse at Romes La Sapienza University February 7, 2001. Italian scientists, working with colleagues in the United States, have created a genetically modified breed of super-muscle mice which do not succumb to as much muscle wasting that occurs during ageing, and are trying to apply the discovery to fight muscular dystrophy. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

Italian PHD Gabriella Dobrowolny holds a genetically modified mouse at Romes La Sapienza University February 7, 2001. Italian scientists, working with colleagues in the United States, have created a genetically modified breed of super-muscle mice which do not succumb to as much muscle wasting that occurs during ageing, and are trying to apply the discovery to fight muscular dystrophy. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

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Scientists said on January 11, 2001 that they had achieved the first genetically engineered monkey, a step that could hasten the development of cures for diseases ranging from cancer to Alzheimer's. The baby rhesus monkey is named ANDi, backward for "inserted DNA," and looks like any other baby monkey, said Gerald Schatten and colleagues of the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center at the Oregon Health Sciences University. ANDi...more

Scientists said on January 11, 2001 that they had achieved the first genetically engineered monkey, a step that could hasten the development of cures for diseases ranging from cancer to Alzheimer's. The baby rhesus monkey is named ANDi, backward for "inserted DNA," and looks like any other baby monkey, said Gerald Schatten and colleagues of the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center at the Oregon Health Sciences University. ANDi who was born on October 2, 2000 is seen in this undated handout photo released on January 11. REUTERS/Handout

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K.C. (top), the first animal produced by cloning from a cell taken from a carcass, is pictured is with her traditionally bred calf Sunshine, who was born December 17, 2004, in this undated photograph released by animal cloning and genomics services company ViaGen on November 12, 2009. ViaGen owns the intellectual property rights to the technology that in 1996 produced Dolly the sheep, the world's first animal cloned from an adult...more

K.C. (top), the first animal produced by cloning from a cell taken from a carcass, is pictured is with her traditionally bred calf Sunshine, who was born December 17, 2004, in this undated photograph released by animal cloning and genomics services company ViaGen on November 12, 2009. ViaGen owns the intellectual property rights to the technology that in 1996 produced Dolly the sheep, the world's first animal cloned from an adult cell, at Scotland's Roslin Institute. REUTERS/Candace Dobson/ViaGen/Handout

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A Russian scientist Alexander Sotnikov stretches a cloned rabbit for tests at the laboratory outside Moscow, February 8, 2005. Many of those used in the research at the biotechnological centre are clones of genetically-modified rabbits, which have had human genes added to their genomes. Scientists say milk from the resulting rabbits contains protein that helps treat cancer in humans. The center, just outside Moscow, keeps dozens of...more

A Russian scientist Alexander Sotnikov stretches a cloned rabbit for tests at the laboratory outside Moscow, February 8, 2005. Many of those used in the research at the biotechnological centre are clones of genetically-modified rabbits, which have had human genes added to their genomes. Scientists say milk from the resulting rabbits contains protein that helps treat cancer in humans. The center, just outside Moscow, keeps dozens of these transgenic rabbits for research purposes. REUTERS/Viktor Korotayev

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Five-year-old Ignacio Bergmmann Jr. (R) holds "Flequillo" (bangs), a year-old genetically engineered donkey, touted as the "smallest in the world," at the Buenos Aires Zoo April 12, 1995. "Flequillo" is 63 cm tall and weighs 12 kg and is smaller than a new-born donkey. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian

Five-year-old Ignacio Bergmmann Jr. (R) holds "Flequillo" (bangs), a year-old genetically engineered donkey, touted as the "smallest in the world," at the Buenos Aires Zoo April 12, 1995. "Flequillo" is 63 cm tall and weighs 12 kg and is smaller than a new-born donkey. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian

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