Edition:
United States

Ghosts of 2001: Brazil worries about another energy crisis

Photographer
UESLEI MARCELINO

A view of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam with the floodgates closed as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. One of the worst droughts in Brazil's history is depriving many dams of the water they need to generate electricity, but Brazil looks less...more

A view of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam with the floodgates closed as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. One of the worst droughts in Brazil's history is depriving many dams of the water they need to generate electricity, but Brazil looks less vulnerable today to an energy crisis similar to one in 2001, since the government built dozens of thermoelectric power plants to reduce the country's dependence on hydro power from 88 percent to about 75 percent. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Close
1 / 4
Photographer
UESLEI MARCELINO

A view of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam with the floodgates closed as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

A view of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam with the floodgates closed as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Close
2 / 4
Photographer
UESLEI MARCELINO

A vulture stands over the drying lakebed of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

A vulture stands over the drying lakebed of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Close
3 / 4
Photographer
UESLEI MARCELINO

A technician works in the control room of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

A technician works in the control room of the Itumbiara hydroelectric dam as the dam runs at only 9 percent of capacity due to low water levels, according to the dam's operator, in the city of Itumbiara on the border between the states of Goias and Minas Gerais in Central Brazil, January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Close
4 / 4

All Collections

Famine strikes South Sudan

4:50pm EST

All Collections

Inside CPAC

4:25pm EST

All Collections

First 100 days of Trump

4:10pm EST

All Collections

Fleeing Islamic State with livestock

11:10am EST

All Collections

South African mobs attack immigrants

10:05am EST

All Collections

Photos of the week

8:20am EST

All Collections

Who has nukes?

Thursday, February 23, 2017

All Collections

Last stand at Standing Rock

Thursday, February 23, 2017