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Pictures | Tue Apr 1, 2014 | 9:35pm EDT

GM on the stand

<p>Grieving mother Rosie Cortinas holds a picture of her deceased son Amador Cortinas as she and fellow families of victims of the GM recall failure hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Grieving mother Rosie Cortinas holds a picture of her deceased son Amador Cortinas as she and fellow families of victims of the GM recall failure hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst more

Grieving mother Rosie Cortinas holds a picture of her deceased son Amador Cortinas as she and fellow families of victims of the GM recall failure hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>Senator Edward Markey holds a General Motors ignition assembly as he joins family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Senator Edward Markey holds a General Motors ignition assembly as he joins family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Senator Edward Markey holds a General Motors ignition assembly as he joins family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>Crash survivor Samantha Denti and grieving mothers Kim Langley and Laura Christian join fellow family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Crash survivor Samantha Denti and grieving mothers Kim Langley and Laura Christian join fellow family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst more

Crash survivor Samantha Denti and grieving mothers Kim Langley and Laura Christian join fellow family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors CEO Mary Barra arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra is sworn in prior to testifying before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra is sworn in prior to testifying before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra is sworn in prior to testifying before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra sits for testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra sits for testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

General Motors CEO Mary Barra sits for testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>Rep. Diana DeGette displays a key ring with a General Motors ignition key and a GM ignition switch mechanism at the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

Rep. Diana DeGette displays a key ring with a General Motors ignition key and a GM ignition switch mechanism at the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Rep. Diana DeGette displays a key ring with a General Motors ignition key and a GM ignition switch mechanism at the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>Rep. Bruce Braley holds up what he said was a 20-year-old General Motors giveaway screwdriver with the slogan "Safety Comes First at GM," as he questions GM Chief Executive Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

Rep. Bruce Braley holds up what he said was a 20-year-old General Motors giveaway screwdriver with the slogan "Safety Comes First at GM," as he questions GM Chief Executive Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's...more

Rep. Bruce Braley holds up what he said was a 20-year-old General Motors giveaway screwdriver with the slogan "Safety Comes First at GM," as he questions GM Chief Executive Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>Committee Chairman Tim Murphy and Ranking Member Rep. Diana DeGette  confer before General Motors CEO Mary Barra's testifmony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing in regard to defective ignition switches on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

Committee Chairman Tim Murphy and Ranking Member Rep. Diana DeGette confer before General Motors CEO Mary Barra's testifmony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing in regard to defective ignition switches on Capitol Hill in...more

Committee Chairman Tim Murphy and Ranking Member Rep. Diana DeGette confer before General Motors CEO Mary Barra's testifmony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing in regard to defective ignition switches on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>Jayne Rimer, whose daughter died from injuries in a GM automobile accident, wipes away tears during testimony by General Motors CEO Mary Barra at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Jayne Rimer, whose daughter died from injuries in a GM automobile accident, wipes away tears during testimony by General Motors CEO Mary Barra at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. ...more

Jayne Rimer, whose daughter died from injuries in a GM automobile accident, wipes away tears during testimony by General Motors CEO Mary Barra at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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<p>GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra departs after testifying at a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra departs after testifying at a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra departs after testifying at a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

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<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra talks to reporters after testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra talks to reporters after testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

General Motors CEO Mary Barra talks to reporters after testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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