Edition:
United States
Pictures | Tue Apr 1, 2014 | 9:35pm EDT

GM on the stand

<p>Grieving mother Rosie Cortinas holds a picture of her deceased son Amador Cortinas as she and fellow families of victims of the GM recall failure hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Grieving mother Rosie Cortinas holds a picture of her deceased son Amador Cortinas as she and fellow families of victims of the GM recall failure hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst more

Grieving mother Rosie Cortinas holds a picture of her deceased son Amador Cortinas as she and fellow families of victims of the GM recall failure hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
1 / 18
<p>Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
2 / 18
<p>Senator Edward Markey holds a General Motors ignition assembly as he joins family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Senator Edward Markey holds a General Motors ignition assembly as he joins family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Senator Edward Markey holds a General Motors ignition assembly as he joins family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
3 / 18
<p>Crash survivor Samantha Denti and grieving mothers Kim Langley and Laura Christian join fellow family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Crash survivor Samantha Denti and grieving mothers Kim Langley and Laura Christian join fellow family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst more

Crash survivor Samantha Denti and grieving mothers Kim Langley and Laura Christian join fellow family members of victims of the GM recall failure for a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
4 / 18
<p>Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Family members of victims of the GM recall failure arrive to hold a news conference on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
5 / 18
<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors CEO Mary Barra arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
6 / 18
<p>General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra is sworn in prior to testifying before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra is sworn in prior to testifying before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra is sworn in prior to testifying before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
7 / 18
<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra sits for testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra sits for testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

General Motors CEO Mary Barra sits for testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
8 / 18
<p>Rep. Diana DeGette displays a key ring with a General Motors ignition key and a GM ignition switch mechanism at the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

Rep. Diana DeGette displays a key ring with a General Motors ignition key and a GM ignition switch mechanism at the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Rep. Diana DeGette displays a key ring with a General Motors ignition key and a GM ignition switch mechanism at the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
9 / 18
<p>GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
10 / 18
<p>Rep. Bruce Braley holds up what he said was a 20-year-old General Motors giveaway screwdriver with the slogan "Safety Comes First at GM," as he questions GM Chief Executive Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

Rep. Bruce Braley holds up what he said was a 20-year-old General Motors giveaway screwdriver with the slogan "Safety Comes First at GM," as he questions GM Chief Executive Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's...more

Rep. Bruce Braley holds up what he said was a 20-year-old General Motors giveaway screwdriver with the slogan "Safety Comes First at GM," as he questions GM Chief Executive Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
11 / 18
<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
12 / 18
<p>Committee Chairman Tim Murphy and Ranking Member Rep. Diana DeGette  confer before General Motors CEO Mary Barra's testifmony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing in regard to defective ignition switches on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

Committee Chairman Tim Murphy and Ranking Member Rep. Diana DeGette confer before General Motors CEO Mary Barra's testifmony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing in regard to defective ignition switches on Capitol Hill in...more

Committee Chairman Tim Murphy and Ranking Member Rep. Diana DeGette confer before General Motors CEO Mary Barra's testifmony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing in regard to defective ignition switches on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
13 / 18
<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.   REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
14 / 18
<p>General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra testifies before a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on GM's recall of defective ignition switches, on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
15 / 18
<p>Jayne Rimer, whose daughter died from injuries in a GM automobile accident, wipes away tears during testimony by General Motors CEO Mary Barra at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

Jayne Rimer, whose daughter died from injuries in a GM automobile accident, wipes away tears during testimony by General Motors CEO Mary Barra at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. ...more

Jayne Rimer, whose daughter died from injuries in a GM automobile accident, wipes away tears during testimony by General Motors CEO Mary Barra at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
16 / 18
<p>GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra departs after testifying at a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra departs after testifying at a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra departs after testifying at a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Close
17 / 18
<p>General Motors CEO Mary Barra talks to reporters after testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>

General Motors CEO Mary Barra talks to reporters after testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

General Motors CEO Mary Barra talks to reporters after testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Close
18 / 18

Next Slideshows

Pictures of the month: March

Our top photos from the month of March.

Apr 01 2014

Deadline for Obamacare

Midnight marks the deadline for Americans to obtain health insurance.

Apr 01 2014

Fukushima homecoming

For the first time since the nuclear disaster three years ago, some residents are allowed to return home.

Apr 01 2014

Mudslide from above

Aerial photos of the mudslide in Washington state.

Apr 01 2014

MORE IN PICTURES

President Trump's first foreign trip

President Trump's first foreign trip

Donald Trump, on his first overseas trip as president, is on a nine-day journey through the Middle East and Europe.

Billboard Music Awards

Billboard Music Awards

Highlights from the Billboard Music Awards.

Best of Cannes

Best of Cannes

Highlights from the 70th Cannes Film Festival on the French Riviera.

Endgame in Mosul

Endgame in Mosul

Seven months into the campaign to recapture Mosul, Islamic State militants are besieged in its northwestern corner.

Curtain closes on Ringling Brothers circus

Curtain closes on Ringling Brothers circus

The clowns, animal acts and acrobats of the storied Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus take their final bow.

North Korea's rockets

North Korea's rockets

Inside North Korea's secretive weapons program.

Trump makes historic visit to Western Wall

Trump makes historic visit to Western Wall

President Trump becomes the first sitting U.S. president to pray at Jerusalem's Western Wall.

Billboard red carpet

Billboard red carpet

Style from the Billboard Music Awards red carpet.

Pippa Middleton marries

Pippa Middleton marries

Pippa Middleton, younger sister of Kate, Britain's Duchess of Cambridge, was married in a small English country church surrounded by royals and celebrities but those hoping for a dash of Hollywood were left in the cold.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast